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Ron Chiplin Allied Bakeries Cardiff. Project

 
 
ronald.chiplin
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      06-08-2004






Allied Bakeries







Institute of leadership & Management

Level 2 certificate in Team Leading

2004













Dough Waste









Ron Chiplin

26/05/2004











CONTENTS



1. Front page

2. contents

3. introduction

4. problem

5. using information

7. making it happen

8. resources

9. leading the team























iNTRODUCTION





My name is Ron Chiplin and I'm employed at Allied Bakeries Cardiff as a
Plant Control Relief (PCR). I have been with the Company for thirteen
years. During this time I have worked in various departments. The past
three years I have held the position of PCR within the Bread Production
Department.



I have decided to do my project on waste dough. After speaking to my
Departmental Manager Alan Chick he suggested that any improvement on waste
dough would show an immediate effect on site and Company profitability and
also this is an issue which all production staff members can relate to
because of its visibility and the problem it causes.































THE PROBLEM





Dough Waste at present is high priority within Allied Bakeries. On average
we produce sixty tonnes of waste per week. This loss affects the Company in
many ways, e.g. loss of sales via lost yield, loss of ingredients used to
produce the waste dough, disposal cost to each site, and cost of direct
labour in order to produce the waste.



CAUSES



Some of the causes of dough waste are due to mechanical problems, some of
which are listed below, but inexperience of manpower is also a contributing
factor.



When a mix of dough ejects from the mixer it passes over a chute to the
hoist bowl and then automatically the bowl lifts up to drop in the hopper of
the divider. If the dough hasn't cleared the chute it leaves a trail of
dough which falls under the hoist bowl and this then accumulates and becomes
waste.



Another problem which gives cause for concern is worn parts of the dividers.
Dough is forced into pockets with a ram and then cut with a blade; if these
dividers are worn the dough will be forced between them and will become
waste.



EFFECTS



The effects are quite clear, if you talk to any member of the bread
production team they refer to waste dough in bowls, they do not tend to
visualise it as weight or convert it into loaves lost. For instance a mini
car weighs around a tonne, so you could say some weeks we throw away the
equivalent to five mini cars of dough waste.









USING INFORMATION







In order to truly understand the problem I asked Alan Chick Manufacturing
Manager if he had any past data on waste dough levels at Cardiff. He showed
me a graph that he sent weekly, displaying this year's current performance.
The most obvious conclusion that could be seen was that there were high
weekly fluctuations on waste dough levels. This indicates poor underlying
controls. There were some peaks that were associated with big bang
breakdowns but the level was still too high.



In order to gather the ideas of my team we held two team meetings where we
discussed the level of wastage and ways in which it could be minimised.



The waste dough has to be weighed in order for us to convert into loaves
lost which can then be converted into cash value, e.g. five tonnes of waste
dough equates to 6,250 800gm loaves which equals in cash to £5,750. When it
has been converted into cash value we can then see the immediate benefits.
Equating the wastage to "minis" made it much easier to comprehend the size
of the waste and this made an impression on the team members.



The meetings generated the following options:



1. Atomised spray guns to be fitted at mixers on each plant
to allow dough chutes to be easily lubricated. The atomised spray would
emit divider oil.

The benefits of this are that it would reduce wastage going under the hoist
bowl, because the divider oil would assist the dough going into the hoist
bowl and not underneath.

It would have a minimal cost in terms of materials as divider oil is
available from a nearby source.

The disadvantage of this is that on a manual operation, using the spray may
be overlooked by an operative. Also the cost of each spray may be
prohibitive.



2. Introduce a more vigorous preventative maintenance
schedule. The advantages are that the machinery will be less likely to fail
as any potential problem would be addressed prior to a fault occurring.

The major drawback would be the allocation of an engineer to work Saturday
morning when the preventative maintenance takes place.



3. Introduce a regular service plan for all dividers in bread
production, so that they can be monitored for any worn parts, thus reduce
dough discharge.

After much discussion it was agreed that it was feasible to implement all of
the above options as they were all valid and relatively simple to do.



















MAKING IT HAPPEN



The intended outcome of this project is to reduce the amount of dough waste
by identifying areas of the process that can be improved.



The target date for completion of all three improvements is three months
from commencement, which is scheduled for 1st July 2004.



The implementation plan is as follows:



1. Detailed discussion with spray installer to finalise
costs. If these are considered to be high then the decision will be passed
to Line Management to resolve.

2. Draw up a regular service plan for all dividers in the
bread production areas.

3. To organise and agree a maintenance team for the weekly
preventative maintenance.

4. To agree success criteria in order to measure its benefits
of the new activities.



In order to ensure that the team is fully aware of what is required we will
hold weekly team briefs during which we can discuss progress.






















RESOURCES



Throughout the project I have been aware of the importance of controlling
resources. The three main areas are:



TIME - Planning time. Urgent, implementation, schedule.



EQUIPMENT -



LABOUR/MANPOWER -





COST/BENEFIT


Total cost of the proposal - £2,000.

Estimated saving on dough wastage - 25% = £1,400 p/week

Pay back in two weeks.

























LEADING THE TEAM



One of the main responsibilities of a team leader is to look at what the
team would require and possible members. There was an obvious need for
people who deal with waste dough daily for their experience and plant
knowledge. Engineering input was also needed for mechanical expertise and I
felt that an outside view on the issues could perhaps highlight areas that
may not be obvious to people who are close to the issue.



ISSUES

q Reduce possible manual handling accidents and claims

q Poor underlying control

q Lack of understanding by staff of potential gains to them and
company

q Reduced waste of ingredients

q Reduce direct labour costs

q Reduce waste dough disposal cost

q Lost sales via yield and customer satisfaction

q Cost of making engineering adjustments to plant



GAINS



q Improved working conditions for staff

q Reduced frustration of staff and possible lost time

q Better staff awareness

q Using their knowledge and involvement

q Increased yield

q Reduced labour cost

q Reduced waste dough disposal cost

q Accountability of staff





FIRST TEAM MEETING
The first team meeting involved the chosen team members from the mentioned
sections and also I will involve the Site Losses Co-ordinator and Technical
Co-ordinator. I will use the current graphs that Alan Chick (Bread
Production Manager) has to demonstrate to the team the current size of the
problem. I felt it important to have a brain storming session where all
views were taken into consideration and allowed the main areas of priority
to become evident. I then had an understanding of each member's commitment
to resolving the problems.

The meeting in itself was not a way of allowing the whole of the staff to
know what is happening. We need to publish this so that we can get 'buy in'
from the rest of the staff at the end of each shift. A white board was
installed at production end that will display how many kilograms of waste
dough were produced on any shift and how much waste dough was cleared.
Waste dough figures will also be declared by Alan Chick, this will be used
to measure performance and recognise successes at weekly briefing and the
graph displayed to show any gains or losses. We will also present to each
shift at these briefings a presentation detailing improvements made and
further initiatives.



CHANGING THE MIND SET FROM DOUGH TO CASH



By using the form which identifies areas of high dough waste and converting
this into a cash figure we can start to instil into the staff a need for
better control by themselves. It is always easy to blame engineering for
failings. It will also allow us to use the cash sum as a loss to identify
pay back for any engineering work undertaken.



















Allied Bakeries







Institute of leadership & Management

Level 2 certificate in Team Leading

2004













Dough Waste









Ron Chiplin

26/05/2004











CONTENTS



1. Front page

2. contents

3. introduction

4. problem

5. using information

7. making it happen

8. resources

9. leading the team























iNTRODUCTION





My name is Ron Chiplin and I'm employed at Allied Bakeries Cardiff as a
Plant Control Relief (PCR). I have been with the Company for thirteen
years. During this time I have worked in various departments. The past
three years I have held the position of PCR within the Bread Production
Department.



I have decided to do my project on waste dough. After speaking to my
Departmental Manager Alan Chick he suggested that any improvement on waste
dough would show an immediate effect on site and Company profitability and
also this is an issue which all production staff members can relate to
because of its visibility and the problem it causes.































THE PROBLEM





Dough Waste at present is high priority within Allied Bakeries. On average
we produce sixty tonnes of waste per week. This loss affects the Company in
many ways, e.g. loss of sales via lost yield, loss of ingredients used to
produce the waste dough, disposal cost to each site, and cost of direct
labour in order to produce the waste.



CAUSES



Some of the causes of dough waste are due to mechanical problems, some of
which are listed below, but inexperience of manpower is also a contributing
factor.



When a mix of dough ejects from the mixer it passes over a chute to the
hoist bowl and then automatically the bowl lifts up to drop in the hopper of
the divider. If the dough hasn't cleared the chute it leaves a trail of
dough which falls under the hoist bowl and this then accumulates and becomes
waste.



Another problem which gives cause for concern is worn parts of the dividers.
Dough is forced into pockets with a ram and then cut with a blade; if these
dividers are worn the dough will be forced between them and will become
waste.



EFFECTS



The effects are quite clear, if you talk to any member of the bread
production team they refer to waste dough in bowls, they do not tend to
visualise it as weight or convert it into loaves lost. For instance a mini
car weighs around a tonne, so you could say some weeks we throw away the
equivalent to five mini cars of dough waste.









USING INFORMATION







In order to truly understand the problem I asked Alan Chick Manufacturing
Manager if he had any past data on waste dough levels at Cardiff. He showed
me a graph that he sent weekly, displaying this year's current performance.
The most obvious conclusion that could be seen was that there were high
weekly fluctuations on waste dough levels. This indicates poor underlying
controls. There were some peaks that were associated with big bang
breakdowns but the level was still too high.



In order to gather the ideas of my team we held two team meetings where we
discussed the level of wastage and ways in which it could be minimised.



The waste dough has to be weighed in order for us to convert into loaves
lost which can then be converted into cash value, e.g. five tonnes of waste
dough equates to 6,250 800gm loaves which equals in cash to £5,750. When it
has been converted into cash value we can then see the immediate benefits.
Equating the wastage to "minis" made it much easier to comprehend the size
of the waste and this made an impression on the team members.



The meetings generated the following options:



1. Atomised spray guns to be fitted at mixers on each plant
to allow dough chutes to be easily lubricated. The atomised spray would
emit divider oil.

The benefits of this are that it would reduce wastage going under the hoist
bowl, because the divider oil would assist the dough going into the hoist
bowl and not underneath.

It would have a minimal cost in terms of materials as divider oil is
available from a nearby source.

The disadvantage of this is that on a manual operation, using the spray may
be overlooked by an operative. Also the cost of each spray may be
prohibitive.



2. Introduce a more vigorous preventative maintenance
schedule. The advantages are that the machinery will be less likely to fail
as any potential problem would be addressed prior to a fault occurring.

The major drawback would be the allocation of an engineer to work Saturday
morning when the preventative maintenance takes place.



3. Introduce a regular service plan for all dividers in bread
production, so that they can be monitored for any worn parts, thus reduce
dough discharge.

After much discussion it was agreed that it was feasible to implement all of
the above options as they were all valid and relatively simple to do.




















MAKING IT HAPPEN



The intended outcome of this project is to reduce the amount of dough waste
by identifying areas of the process that can be improved.



The target date for completion of all three improvements is three months
from commencement, which is scheduled for 1st July 2004.



The implementation plan is as follows:



1. Detailed discussion with spray installer to finalise
costs. If these are considered to be high then the decision will be passed
to Line Management to resolve.

2. Draw up a regular service plan for all dividers in the
bread production areas.

3. To organise and agree a maintenance team for the weekly
preventative maintenance.

4. To agree success criteria in order to measure its benefits
of the new activities.



In order to ensure that the team is fully aware of what is required we will
hold weekly team briefs during which we can discuss progress.






















RESOURCES



Throughout the project I have been aware of the importance of controlling
resources. The three main areas are:



TIME - Planning time. Urgent, implementation, schedule.



EQUIPMENT -



LABOUR/MANPOWER -





COST/BENEFIT


Total cost of the proposal - £2,000.

Estimated saving on dough wastage - 25% = £1,400 p/week

Pay back in two weeks.

























LEADING THE TEAM



One of the main responsibilities of a team leader is to look at what the
team would require and possible members. There was an obvious need for
people who deal with waste dough daily for their experience and plant
knowledge. Engineering input was also needed for mechanical expertise and I
felt that an outside view on the issues could perhaps highlight areas that
may not be obvious to people who are close to the issue.



ISSUES

q Reduce possible manual handling accidents and claims

q Poor underlying control

q Lack of understanding by staff of potential gains to them and
company

q Reduced waste of ingredients

q Reduce direct labour costs

q Reduce waste dough disposal cost

q Lost sales via yield and customer satisfaction

q Cost of making engineering adjustments to plant



GAINS



q Improved working conditions for staff

q Reduced frustration of staff and possible lost time

q Better staff awareness

q Using their knowledge and involvement

q Increased yield

q Reduced labour cost

q Reduced waste dough disposal cost

q Accountability of staff





FIRST TEAM MEETING
The first team meeting involved the chosen team members from the mentioned
sections and also I will involve the Site Losses Co-ordinator and Technical
Co-ordinator. I will use the current graphs that Alan Chick (Bread
Production Manager) has to demonstrate to the team the current size of the
problem. I felt it important to have a brain storming session where all
views were taken into consideration and allowed the main areas of priority
to become evident. I then had an understanding of each member's commitment
to resolving the problems.

The meeting in itself was not a way of allowing the whole of the staff to
know what is happening. We need to publish this so that we can get 'buy in'
from the rest of the staff at the end of each shift. A white board was
installed at production end that will display how many kilograms of waste
dough were produced on any shift and how much waste dough was cleared.
Waste dough figures will also be declared by Alan Chick, this will be used
to measure performance and recognise successes at weekly briefing and the
graph displayed to show any gains or losses. We will also present to each
shift at these briefings a presentation detailing improvements made and
further initiatives.



CHANGING THE MIND SET FROM DOUGH TO CASH



By using the form which identifies areas of high dough waste and converting
this into a cash figure we can start to instil into the staff a need for
better control by themselves. It is always easy to blame engineering for
failings. It will also allow us to use the cash sum as a loss to identify
pay back for any engineering work undertaken.

























Allied Bakeries







Institute of leadership & Management

Level 2 certificate in Team Leading

2004













Dough Waste









Ron Chiplin

26/05/2004











CONTENTS



1. Front page

2. contents

3. introduction

4. problem

5. using information

7. making it happen

8. resources

9. leading the team























iNTRODUCTION





My name is Ron Chiplin and I'm employed at Allied Bakeries Cardiff as a
Plant Control Relief (PCR). I have been with the Company for thirteen
years. During this time I have worked in various departments. The past
three years I have held the position of PCR within the Bread Production
Department.



I have decided to do my project on waste dough. After speaking to my
Departmental Manager Alan Chick he suggested that any improvement on waste
dough would show an immediate effect on site and Company profitability and
also this is an issue which all production staff members can relate to
because of its visibility and the problem it causes.































THE PROBLEM





Dough Waste at present is high priority within Allied Bakeries. On average
we produce sixty tonnes of waste per week. This loss affects the Company in
many ways, e.g. loss of sales via lost yield, loss of ingredients used to
produce the waste dough, disposal cost to each site, and cost of direct
labour in order to produce the waste.



CAUSES



Some of the causes of dough waste are due to mechanical problems, some of
which are listed below, but inexperience of manpower is also a contributing
factor.



When a mix of dough ejects from the mixer it passes over a chute to the
hoist bowl and then automatically the bowl lifts up to drop in the hopper of
the divider. If the dough hasn't cleared the chute it leaves a trail of
dough which falls under the hoist bowl and this then accumulates and becomes
waste.



Another problem which gives cause for concern is worn parts of the dividers.
Dough is forced into pockets with a ram and then cut with a blade; if these
dividers are worn the dough will be forced between them and will become
waste.



EFFECTS



The effects are quite clear, if you talk to any member of the bread
production team they refer to waste dough in bowls, they do not tend to
visualise it as weight or convert it into loaves lost. For instance a mini
car weighs around a tonne, so you could say some weeks we throw away the
equivalent to five mini cars of dough waste.









USING INFORMATION







In order to truly understand the problem I asked Alan Chick Manufacturing
Manager if he had any past data on waste dough levels at Cardiff. He showed
me a graph that he sent weekly, displaying this year's current performance.
The most obvious conclusion that could be seen was that there were high
weekly fluctuations on waste dough levels. This indicates poor underlying
controls. There were some peaks that were associated with big bang
breakdowns but the level was still too high.



In order to gather the ideas of my team we held two team meetings where we
discussed the level of wastage and ways in which it could be minimised.



The waste dough has to be weighed in order for us to convert into loaves
lost which can then be converted into cash value, e.g. five tonnes of waste
dough equates to 6,250 800gm loaves which equals in cash to £5,750. When it
has been converted into cash value we can then see the immediate benefits.
Equating the wastage to "minis" made it much easier to comprehend the size
of the waste and this made an impression on the team members.



The meetings generated the following options:



1. Atomised spray guns to be fitted at mixers on each plant
to allow dough chutes to be easily lubricated. The atomised spray would
emit divider oil.

The benefits of this are that it would reduce wastage going under the hoist
bowl, because the divider oil would assist the dough going into the hoist
bowl and not underneath.

It would have a minimal cost in terms of materials as divider oil is
available from a nearby source.

The disadvantage of this is that on a manual operation, using the spray may
be overlooked by an operative. Also the cost of each spray may be
prohibitive.



2. Introduce a more vigorous preventative maintenance
schedule. The advantages are that the machinery will be less likely to fail
as any potential problem would be addressed prior to a fault occurring.

The major drawback would be the allocation of an engineer to work Saturday
morning when the preventative maintenance takes place.



3. Introduce a regular service plan for all dividers in bread
production, so that they can be monitored for any worn parts, thus reduce
dough discharge.

After much discussion it was agreed that it was feasible to implement all of
the above options as they were all valid and relatively simple to do.




















MAKING IT HAPPEN



The intended outcome of this project is to reduce the amount of dough waste
by identifying areas of the process that can be improved.



The target date for completion of all three improvements is three months
from commencement, which is scheduled for 1st July 2004.



The implementation plan is as follows:



1. Detailed discussion with spray installer to finalise
costs. If these are considered to be high then the decision will be passed
to Line Management to resolve.

2. Draw up a regular service plan for all dividers in the
bread production areas.

3. To organise and agree a maintenance team for the weekly
preventative maintenance.

4. To agree success criteria in order to measure its benefits
of the new activities.



In order to ensure that the team is fully aware of what is required we will
hold weekly team briefs during which we can discuss progress.






















RESOURCES



Throughout the project I have been aware of the importance of controlling
resources. The three main areas are:



TIME - Planning time. Urgent, implementation, schedule.



EQUIPMENT -



LABOUR/MANPOWER -





COST/BENEFIT


Total cost of the proposal - £2,000.

Estimated saving on dough wastage - 25% = £1,400 p/week

Pay back in two weeks.

























LEADING THE TEAM



One of the main responsibilities of a team leader is to look at what the
team would require and possible members. There was an obvious need for
people who deal with waste dough daily for their experience and plant
knowledge. Engineering input was also needed for mechanical expertise and I
felt that an outside view on the issues could perhaps highlight areas that
may not be obvious to people who are close to the issue.



ISSUES

q Reduce possible manual handling accidents and claims

q Poor underlying control

q Lack of understanding by staff of potential gains to them and
company

q Reduced waste of ingredients

q Reduce direct labour costs

q Reduce waste dough disposal cost

q Lost sales via yield and customer satisfaction

q Cost of making engineering adjustments to plant



GAINS



q Improved working conditions for staff

q Reduced frustration of staff and possible lost time

q Better staff awareness

q Using their knowledge and involvement

q Increased yield

q Reduced labour cost

q Reduced waste dough disposal cost

q Accountability of staff





FIRST TEAM MEETING
The first team meeting involved the chosen team members from the mentioned
sections and also I will involve the Site Losses Co-ordinator and Technical
Co-ordinator. I will use the current graphs that Alan Chick (Bread
Production Manager) has to demonstrate to the team the current size of the
problem. I felt it important to have a brain storming session where all
views were taken into consideration and allowed the main areas of priority
to become evident. I then had an understanding of each member's commitment
to resolving the problems.

The meeting in itself was not a way of allowing the whole of the staff to
know what is happening. We need to publish this so that we can get 'buy in'
from the rest of the staff at the end of each shift. A white board was
installed at production end that will display how many kilograms of waste
dough were produced on any shift and how much waste dough was cleared.
Waste dough figures will also be declared by Alan Chick, this will be used
to measure performance and recognise successes at weekly briefing and the
graph displayed to show any gains or losses. We will also present to each
shift at these briefings a presentation detailing improvements made and
further initiatives.



CHANGING THE MIND SET FROM DOUGH TO CASH



By using the form which identifies areas of high dough waste and converting
this into a cash figure we can start to instil into the staff a need for
better control by themselves. It is always easy to blame engineering for
failings. It will also allow us to use the cash sum as a loss to identify
pay back for any engineering work undertaken.




























 
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Ionizer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-08-2004

"ronald.chiplin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dEqxc.15$np2.12@newsfe1-win...

> I have decided to do my project on waste dough.


Why don't you try doing a project on how to differentiate between sending
an email message and posting to an international newsgroup?

The waste dough may be all in your head.

--
Ian.


 
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ICee
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-08-2004
ronald.chiplin wrote:
> I have decided to do my project on waste dough.


<snip the drivel>

Good start, as you're obviously wasting dough on internet access.


 
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EricP
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-08-2004
On Tue, 8 Jun 2004 21:58:46 +0100, "ronald.chiplin"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Allied Bakeries


Oh dear, poor Ron )


 
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Dodgy Dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-08-2004

"ronald.chiplin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dEqxc.15$np2.12@newsfe1-win...
>

Dough-nut


 
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Toolman Tim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2004
EricP wrote:
> On Tue, 8 Jun 2004 21:58:46 +0100, "ronald.chiplin"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Allied Bakeries

>
> Oh dear, poor Ron )


At least he didn't post in in HTML <g>


 
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Avengerİ
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2004
On Tue, 8 Jun 2004 21:58:46 +0100, "ronald.chiplin"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>
>
>
>
>
>Allied Bakeries


<the dough kneaded>

Good one Ron, you know the saying, man cannot live on bread alone!!!!

--
Avengerİ
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
"Put the CAT out to reply"
*I DETEST Spam - A Spam Hater since 1951*
 
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Plato
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2004
Sell it to a dog food maker or pig farm.
 
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PVM
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-09-2004

"ronald.chiplin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dEqxc.15$np2.12@newsfe1-win...
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Allied Bakeries
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Institute of leadership & Management
>
> Level 2 certificate in Team Leading
>
> 2004
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Dough Waste
>

A simpler solution would be to close the bakery down, and buy the finished
product from a bakery that makes the product cheaper,
May I suggest

Rathbones at Newport.


PVM
I know this is not a subject that normally gets discussed in here, but after
all it is called 24hoursupport.helpdesk, and I do like to help when
possible.
I'm not saying where I work, But I do have some inside knowledge.


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.701 / Virus Database: 458 - Release Date: 07/06/2004


 
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Chris
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-10-2004
"ICee" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> ronald.chiplin wrote:
> > I have decided to do my project on waste dough.

>
> <snip the drivel>
>
> Good start, as you're obviously wasting dough on internet access.



Ha ha....!!!! My first genuine belly laugh in ages......


 
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