Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Support > Replacing fan in power supply?

Reply
Thread Tools

Replacing fan in power supply?

 
 
Daniel
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-10-2004
I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of concern,
or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be moving?).

I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a volt
meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK (do
have equipment for that).

I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking for
someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
$XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
computer...or anything else like that).

--

Daniel http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)

--

There are 10 types of people in this world...
....those that understand binary & those that don't.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Sano
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
On Mon, 10 May 2004 18:41:06 -0500, Daniel wrote:

replacing my power supply fan (plan
> to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
> been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
> twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
> moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
> about elecrical tape?


Uh, yeah, I'd solder them. And put heatshrink on 'em.

But at the very least use some wirenuts.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
SgtMinor
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
Daniel wrote:
>
> I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
> to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
> been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
> twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
> moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
> about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
> insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
> General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of concern,
> or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be moving?).
>
> I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
> term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
> exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a volt
> meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK (do
> have equipment for that).
>
> I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking for
> someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
> $XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
> power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
> computer...or anything else like that).
>
> --
>
> Daniel (E-Mail Removed)


You could solder the wires together but then you'd need some heat
activated shrink tube or the tape solution. Cheap tape is crap - it
loses adhesion and comes apart, especially in warm environments. Use
'wire nuts' instead, twist connectors for electrical wiring. They're a
bit more bulky but you can use some tie wrap to secure them out of the
way of the airflow.

But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?
 
Reply With Quote
 
slumpy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
....and seconds before the explosion, SgtMinor emerged from the bunker
carrying the last chicken tikka masala humanity would ever see, crying:

> But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
> sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
> item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


Got to be the best option - probably not much more than the cost of a fan,
and a two-minute job. No way I'd start messing around with internal wiring
and soldering unless there was no other option.
--
slumpy
no more
no less
just me
(cheap at twice the price...)


 
Reply With Quote
 
SgtMinor
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004


slumpy wrote:
>
> ...and seconds before the explosion, SgtMinor emerged from the bunker
> carrying the last chicken tikka masala humanity would ever see, crying:
>
> > But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
> > sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
> > item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?

>
> Got to be the best option - probably not much more than the cost of a fan,
> and a two-minute job. No way I'd start messing around with internal wiring
> and soldering unless there was no other option.


A friend of mine spent two days' hard labor, clearing brush on a ranch,
in return for a 500 cc motorbike that 'hadn't run for awhile.' He
'restored' the bike for about $750 plus another twenty hours of his
labor, got it up and running and was able to sell it for $500.

--
"That sort of math is troubling to me."
 
Reply With Quote
 
Ron Martell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
"Daniel" <daniel_h_wATyahooDOTcom> wrote:

>I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
>to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
>been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
>twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
>moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but what
>about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
>insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
>General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of concern,
>or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be moving?).
>
>I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
>term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
>exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a volt
>meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK (do
>have equipment for that).
>
>I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking for
>someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
>$XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
>power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
>computer...or anything else like that).
>


Most, but not all, power supply fans connect to a 2 pin connector on
the printed circuit board inside the power supply. And most
replacement fans come with a similar connector in place.

Another option - many of the replacement power supply fans that I buy
come with a connector extension that plugs into an unused 4-pin drive
power connector. What I often do, to avoid wire splicing etc, is
just to route the new fan's power leads to the outside of the power
supply (using the same hole as the other power leads) and then using
the extension to plug it into an unused connector.

Good luck


Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

"The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
 
Reply With Quote
 
Blinky the Shark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
slumpy wrote:

> ...and seconds before the explosion, SgtMinor emerged from the bunker
> carrying the last chicken tikka masala humanity would ever see, crying:


>> But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
>> sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
>> item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


> Got to be the best option - probably not much more than the cost of a fan,
> and a two-minute job. No way I'd start messing around with internal wiring
> and soldering unless there was no other option.


I probably wouldn't screw with it either. *But* the last small fan I
bought was about $5 and the last PS was $119.[1] One can certainly get
cheaper PSs than that -- but he's not going to find one for five or ten
bucks he'd actually want to use in a system.

[1]Retail (Fry's, for any Western USans reading this), not online-order,
but S&H often makes up the difference, anyway.

--
Blinky Linux Registered User 4892F
AOL Diary http://snipurl.com/aoldiary
Nigerian Scam From Space http://snipurl.com/iss419
New Windows - Don't Wait For Longhorn! http://snipurl.com/newwin
 
Reply With Quote
 
Daniel
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
> You could solder the wires together but then you'd need some heat
> activated shrink tube or the tape solution. Cheap tape is crap - it
> loses adhesion and comes apart, especially in warm environments. Use
> 'wire nuts' instead, twist connectors for electrical wiring. They're a
> bit more bulky but you can use some tie wrap to secure them out of the
> way of the airflow.
>

Could do that...think I've got a few wire nuts around. (have to look through
some stuff though).

> But why not just buy a new power supply? If the fan is cooked are you
> sure that the rest is OK? And if the fan were a standard replacement
> item, wouldn't it be easier to plug in?


I did ask about that one already, about a week ago (5-5-04 1:51PM Central
Time)....I was told by this group "why not just replace the fan?", so I ask
about replacing the fan, and am told "why not just replace the power
supply?".

What is a good recommended brand of power supply to get? I've looked at
NewEgg's
(http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...ubmit=property
&mfrcode=0&propertycode=&propertycodevalue=3801 ) list. Need 300W for AMD,
needs to lay down in case with fan in back.


 
Reply With Quote
 
Linda
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
If he needs luck, he's in trouble.

"Ron Martell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Daniel" <daniel_h_wATyahooDOTcom> wrote:
>
> >I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power

supply fan (plan
> >to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out

of the case has
> >been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires

together or is
> >twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since

they wont be
> >moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good

enough?...but what
> >about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be

a good
> >insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a

local "Dollar
> >General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that

allot of concern,
> >or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that

wont be moving?).
> >
> >I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole

thing up for long
> >term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the

wires, leave some
> >exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply &

can simply use a volt
> >meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if

needed) is OK (do
> >have equipment for that).
> >
> >I've done this sort of thing before, but am

checking/refreshing/looking for
> >someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W &

also hooked up to
> >$XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently

let the too high
> >power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the

ground wires in my
> >computer...or anything else like that).
> >

>
> Most, but not all, power supply fans connect to a 2 pin

connector on
> the printed circuit board inside the power supply. And

most
> replacement fans come with a similar connector in place.
>
> Another option - many of the replacement power supply fans

that I buy
> come with a connector extension that plugs into an unused

4-pin drive
> power connector. What I often do, to avoid wire splicing

etc, is
> just to route the new fan's power leads to the outside of

the power
> supply (using the same hole as the other power leads) and

then using
> the extension to plug it into an unused connector.
>
> Good luck
>
>
> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
> --
> Microsoft MVP
> On-Line Help Computer Service
> http://onlinehelp.bc.ca
>
> "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't

eat much."


 
Reply With Quote
 
Buffalo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-11-2004
The fans are 'low voltage' and their leads don't require much insulation,
unless they will rub against something.
Even so, small wire nuts will work just fine and they can be had easily and
cheaply.

"Daniel" <daniel_h_wATyahooDOTcom> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> I'm taking some people's suggestions & replacing my power supply fan (plan
> to be able to do this tomorrow or Wednesday, sitting out of the case has
> been good enough so far). Do I HAVE to solder the wires together or is
> twisting them & electrical taping them good enough (since they wont be
> moving then shouldn't just twisting them together be good enough?...but

what
> about elecrical tape?...Is that strong/thick enough to be a good
> insulator?...I've got some green electrical tape from a local "Dollar
> General Store" here...quality may not be best but is that allot of

concern,
> or is it required to at least be safe & OK for wires that wont be

moving?).
>
> I'd like to test the new fan before hooking the whole thing up for long
> term. What is the best way to do this? I can cut the wires, leave some
> exposed as I'm connecting it to the old power supply & can simply use a

volt
> meter to make sure the voltage (or even can check amps if needed) is OK

(do
> have equipment for that).
>
> I've done this sort of thing before, but am checking/refreshing/looking

for
> someone with personal experience, due to this IS 300W & also hooked up to
> $XXXX worth of other electronics (dont want to accidently let the too high
> power burn through the tape & shoot 300W through the ground wires in my
> computer...or anything else like that).
>
> --
>
> Daniel (E-Mail Removed)
>
> --
>
> There are 10 types of people in this world...
> ...those that understand binary & those that don't.
>
>



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thermaltake ISGC Fan 12 120MM Fan Ian Front Page News 0 06-22-2009 01:28 PM
no boot - cpu fan starts then stops - mboard led on - no power supply fan danpearson@doubt.com Computer Support 3 12-30-2006 05:46 PM
replacing graphics card cooling fan.....how? thingy NZ Computing 11 10-24-2005 12:38 AM
Replacing a heatsink & fan for an Athlon 1700+ processor Bob Computer Support 5 07-28-2004 10:00 PM



Advertisments