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Any way to force faster modem connection speeds?

 
 
Carol Haynes
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      02-24-2004
I just purchased a new modem to replace my old one which just died.

Until a couple of days ago I was getting speeds of 45.6, 48 and sometimes
52Kb/s but with the new modem I can't get speeds faster than 33.6Kb/s.

Anyone any idea how to get the new modem to negotiate a faster speed on
connection? Presumably the correct INIT string could force a specific
connection type and minimum speed but I don't know what the string should be
!

There is a PDF manual on the driver CD ROM but no utilities for tweaking the
modem. The manual is simply all the AT commands supported by the modem (all
138 pages of them) which I can't make any sense of.

My ISP only supports V90 for modems and the new modem is a Dynamode M56EXT-T
external V92 HAYES compatible serial modem (Intel chipset).

I am running Win XP Pro SP1.

Any help would be much appreciated.

--
Carol Haynes
Reply address is set to vaporize - don't expect a reply!



 
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°Mike°
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      02-24-2004
Read the manual on how to disable V92 in the init strings.

Try:
AT&F&C1&D2M0+MS=V34,0

The +MS=V34,0 is what you are looking for with regards
to disabling V92..


On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 23:41:45 -0000, in
<c1gnfm$1iqmip$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de>
Carol Haynes scrawled:

>I just purchased a new modem to replace my old one which just died.
>
>Until a couple of days ago I was getting speeds of 45.6, 48 and sometimes
>52Kb/s but with the new modem I can't get speeds faster than 33.6Kb/s.
>
>Anyone any idea how to get the new modem to negotiate a faster speed on
>connection? Presumably the correct INIT string could force a specific
>connection type and minimum speed but I don't know what the string should be
>!
>
>There is a PDF manual on the driver CD ROM but no utilities for tweaking the
>modem. The manual is simply all the AT commands supported by the modem (all
>138 pages of them) which I can't make any sense of.
>
>My ISP only supports V90 for modems and the new modem is a Dynamode M56EXT-T
>external V92 HAYES compatible serial modem (Intel chipset).
>
>I am running Win XP Pro SP1.
>
>Any help would be much appreciated.


--
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http://uk.geocities.com/personel44/maintenance.html
 
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Carol Haynes
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      02-25-2004
Thanks for trying Mike.

I entered the string as typed and then my modem stopped working! I looked in
the log and it said error so I tried:

AT+MS=V34,0

and

+MS=V34,0

both of which yielded errors.

Looking up V34 in the manual it turns out it needs 4 parameters in the
format:

+MS=carrier, automode,min rate, max rate

so I tried:

+MS=V34,1,14400,0

and got a slower connect rate!

I then swapped the 14400 for all the higher possible values: 16800, 19200,
21600, 24000, 26400, 28800, 31200, 33600 and connections were established
with all but the highest value which just caused redialling.

Trouble is all the values made connections at speeds lower than the default
value of 33.6 I was getting before.

This is seriously strange ????

Any other ideas?

Cheers

--
Carol Haynes
Reply address is set to vaporize - don't expect a reply!



"°Mike°" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Read the manual on how to disable V92 in the init strings.
>
> Try:
> AT&F&C1&D2M0+MS=V34,0
>
> The +MS=V34,0 is what you are looking for with regards
> to disabling V92..
>
>
> On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 23:41:45 -0000, in
> <c1gnfm$1iqmip$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de>
> Carol Haynes scrawled:
>
> >I just purchased a new modem to replace my old one which just died.
> >
> >Until a couple of days ago I was getting speeds of 45.6, 48 and sometimes
> >52Kb/s but with the new modem I can't get speeds faster than 33.6Kb/s.
> >
> >Anyone any idea how to get the new modem to negotiate a faster speed on
> >connection? Presumably the correct INIT string could force a specific
> >connection type and minimum speed but I don't know what the string should

be
> >!
> >
> >There is a PDF manual on the driver CD ROM but no utilities for tweaking

the
> >modem. The manual is simply all the AT commands supported by the modem

(all
> >138 pages of them) which I can't make any sense of.
> >
> >My ISP only supports V90 for modems and the new modem is a Dynamode

M56EXT-T
> >external V92 HAYES compatible serial modem (Intel chipset).
> >
> >I am running Win XP Pro SP1.
> >
> >Any help would be much appreciated.

>
> --
> Basic computer maintenance
> http://uk.geocities.com/personel44/maintenance.html



 
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eric the seal
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-25-2004
It could be:

a)Your new modem may not be as good as the old. i.e. more noisy, less
sensitive.
b) If the old modem died in say a lighning strike, there may also be new
exchange equipment.
c) The lead from the modem to wall socket. Have you tried swopping it or
shortening it? And not wrapping it around your cordless phone..
d) Did you look at the port speed on the pc and is it higher than 33k?
e) Tried borrowing another modem to see if it is better?

AT commands can be useful but, in this context, I have mostly used them to
turn DOWN a connection speed because the negotiation had been overly
optimistic about what speed could be supported.






Carol Haynes wrote:
:: Thanks for trying Mike.
::
:: I entered the string as typed and then my modem stopped working! I
:: looked in the log and it said error so I tried:
::
:: AT+MS=V34,0
::
:: and
::
:: +MS=V34,0
::
:: both of which yielded errors.
::
:: Looking up V34 in the manual it turns out it needs 4 parameters in
:: the format:
::
:: +MS=carrier, automode,min rate, max rate
::
:: so I tried:
::
:: +MS=V34,1,14400,0
::
:: and got a slower connect rate!
::
:: I then swapped the 14400 for all the higher possible values: 16800,
:: 19200, 21600, 24000, 26400, 28800, 31200, 33600 and connections were
:: established with all but the highest value which just caused
:: redialling.
::
:: Trouble is all the values made connections at speeds lower than the
:: default value of 33.6 I was getting before.
::
:: This is seriously strange ????
::
:: Any other ideas?
::
:: Cheers
::
:: --
:: Carol Haynes
:: Reply address is set to vaporize - don't expect a reply!
::
::
::
:: "°Mike°" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
:: news:(E-Mail Removed)...
::: Read the manual on how to disable V92 in the init strings.
:::
::: Try:
::: AT&F&C1&D2M0+MS=V34,0
:::
::: The +MS=V34,0 is what you are looking for with regards
::: to disabling V92..
:::
:::
::: On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 23:41:45 -0000, in
::: <c1gnfm$1iqmip$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de>
::: Carol Haynes scrawled:
:::
:::: I just purchased a new modem to replace my old one which just died.
::::
:::: Until a couple of days ago I was getting speeds of 45.6, 48 and
:::: sometimes 52Kb/s but with the new modem I can't get speeds faster
:::: than 33.6Kb/s.
::::
:::: Anyone any idea how to get the new modem to negotiate a faster
:::: speed on connection? Presumably the correct INIT string could
:::: force a specific connection type and minimum speed but I don't
:::: know what the string should be !
::::
:::: There is a PDF manual on the driver CD ROM but no utilities for
:::: tweaking the modem. The manual is simply all the AT commands
:::: supported by the modem (all 138 pages of them) which I can't make
:::: any sense of.
::::
:::: My ISP only supports V90 for modems and the new modem is a
:::: Dynamode M56EXT-T external V92 HAYES compatible serial modem
:::: (Intel chipset).
::::
:::: I am running Win XP Pro SP1.
::::
:::: Any help would be much appreciated.
:::

--
Brain set to evaporate - may not make sense!


 
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Carol Haynes
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      02-25-2004
> a)Your new modem may not be as good as the old. i.e. more noisy, less
> sensitive.


True ... but ...

> b) If the old modem died in say a lighning strike, there may also be new
> exchange equipment.


No - a chip died in it I think, it just took longer and longer to 'warm
up' - it got to the point where I had to switch the modem on an hour before
the PC !

> c) The lead from the modem to wall socket. Have you tried swopping it or
> shortening it? And not wrapping it around your cordless phone..


Hmmm - I just swapped the cable with the one from the old modem and
connected it directly to the wall socket. Now getting 44kbs so it looks like
that could be it. I had the modem connected through a surge protection
block - maybe it is time to replace it as I have had it a few years and I
know they get "tired" over time!

Still not exactly zippy though is it?

> d) Did you look at the port speed on the pc and is it higher than 33k?


Yes - it is at 115,200

> e) Tried borrowing another modem to see if it is better?


No but I have a second modem that has never given good connection speeds
which seems pretty consistent with its old performance.

> AT commands can be useful but, in this context, I have mostly used them to
> turn DOWN a connection speed because the negotiation had been overly
> optimistic about what speed could be supported.


That's what I thought - but I figured like Mike it could be something to do
with trying to negotiate V92 and failing.

Cheers

Carol


 
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°Mike°
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-25-2004
On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 13:39:52 -0000, in
<c1i8j2$1icnco$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de>
Carol Haynes scrawled:

<snip>

>Still not exactly zippy though is it?


44kbs is fine for dial-up. I never get over 48kbs.

<snip>

--
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http://uk.geocities.com/personel44/maintenance.html
 
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w_tom
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-26-2004
Adjacent protector is not doing anything for you. Telco
already installs a phone line protector on phone lines. A
protector so inexpensive and so effective (because it is
earthed at the premise interface) that telco installs it for
free.

Your plug-in protector may not be same low capacitance
type. Like some badly designed phones, protector would
decrease modem connect speeds (be it a minor decrease).

Does the protector get 'tired"? Yes if it suffers enough
transients. However protectors typically see transients so
large maybe once every eight years. Furthermore, that free
telco provided, 'whole house' protector is different
(superior) technology - does not 'tire' (degrade).

BTW, how does lightning damage modems? Incoming on AC
electric. Outgoing to earth ground via phone line. Lightning
seeks earth ground. If not earthed at building's service
entrance, then lightning seeks earth ground, destructively,
via household appliances. Modems are easiest damaged because
modems provide a direct connection to earth ground - phone
line. Modem protection means a 'whole house' protector is
required on your AC mains - the source of most destructive
transients.

What that ineffective plug-in protector would rather not
discuss (to make the sale)? A surge protector is only as
effective as its earth ground. That plug-in protectors has
all but no earth ground. No earth ground means no effective
protection. But the telco provided 'whole house' protector
makes the essential 'less than 10 foot' connection to earth.
Effective as its earth ground.

Carol Haynes wrote:
> Hmmm - I just swapped the cable with the one from the old modem and
> connected it directly to the wall socket. Now getting 44kbs so it
> looks like that could be it. I had the modem connected through a
> surge protection block - maybe it is time to replace it as I have
> had it a few years and I know they get "tired" over time!
>
> Still not exactly zippy though is it?
> ...

 
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Carol Haynes
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      02-27-2004
Some good points made - but I have a Belkin UPS system with built in surge
protection.

The main reason I use it is for tidy shutdown on power spikes/drops because
I live in aremote rural community and they are common. The other reason is
that if my equipment is damaged by power surges, transients etc. then they
are insured if they are connected via this device - if they aren't I can
kiss my insurance goodbye.

Carol


 
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w_tom
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      02-27-2004
The Belkin forgets to mention which type of transient it
protects from. They claim protection only from the type of
protection that does not typically exist. And the warranty
(its not insurance) has a long history of not being honored.
But then in any free market, the trend is common. Hyundai
claims a warranty far in excess of Toyota and Honda. Does
that provide Hyundai more reliable? Of course not. In surge
protection, then benchmark companies - serious protectors -
provide no warranty.

How it identify an effective protector - it discussion
earthing... extensively. Where does your Belkin discuss
earthing? Not grounding - a term used to deceive. Where do
they say the protector requires a less than 10 foot connection
to earth ground? Just something more they forget to mention.

The UPS is important for battery backup. Protection of data
especially if you computer is using FAT filesystem - not using
NTFS. Effective protection must be at the service entrance.
UPS connects computer directly to AC mains when not in battery
backup mode. Where is the protection? In the meantime, your
computer already contains any protection that can be effective
at the computer. Internal protection that assumes the
destructive transient will be earthed before entering the
building. If not earthed by a 'whole house' protector, then
the destructive transient will overwhelm internal computer
protection and probably find earth ground via your modem.

How many transistorized appliances require protection?
Dishwasher? GFCI receptacles in bathroom and kitchen? Clock
radio? You spent how much to protect one computer? $50 for a
protector that does not even claim protection from common mode
transients. 'Whole house' protector costs less than $1 per
protected appliance. AND 'whole house' protector does provide
that short connection to earth meaning it does provide common
mode transient protection.

Returning to that warranty:
Albert Spencil on 19 Jun 2003 in comp.home.automation
In "UPS for computer and TV"
> That UPS warranty is a crock ! They lay it out very clearly in
> the document that comes in the box. They will at their option
> repair or replace your equipment at the current value as given
> in Orion Blue Book. The value of a two year old home PC would
> not replace a motherboard.


And that warranty will do nothing for your lost data.

The newsgroups are chock full of stories about plug-in
protector warranties not honored. That warranty has
fine-print exemptions. Did you read the many page details, or
did they just forget to provide all those warranty details
with your UPS?

Your modem requires protection from AC electric transients.
The effective protector earths a transient before it can enter
the building. 'Whole house' protector connects less than 10
feet to same earth ground that your telco 'whole house'
protectors uses. I have never seen effective protectors sold
in Sear, Walmart, Kmart, Staples, CompUSA, or Office Max.
They sell plenty of protectors that - read the specs - don't
even claim protection from the type of surge that destroyed
transistors.

Why does your telco already install a 'whole house'
protector for free? In part, because it costs so little as is
so effective. You must do same for all other incoming
utilities. CATV, by code, must connect to your central earth
ground (no protector - they make a hardwire connection) before
entering the building. But AC electric typically has no
protector - unless you take initiative and install a 'whole
house' protector. A surge protector is only as effective as
its earth ground - no matter what you think that warranty
implies. BTW, this comes from an EE with a few decades of
experience - which is why I knew about the telco provided
protector.


Carol Haynes wrote:
> Some good points made - but I have a Belkin UPS system with built
> in surge protection.
>
> The main reason I use it is for tidy shutdown on power spikes/drops
> because I live in aremote rural community and they are common. The
> other reason is that if my equipment is damaged by power surges,
> transients etc. then they are insured if they are connected via
> this device - if they aren't I can kiss my insurance goodbye.
>
> Carol

 
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BuffNET Tech Support - MichaelJ
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      02-27-2004
w_tom wrote:

> BTW, how does lightning damage modems? Incoming on AC
> electric. Outgoing to earth ground via phone line. Lightning
> seeks earth ground. If not earthed at building's service
> entrance, then lightning seeks earth ground, destructively,
> via household appliances.


Now *that* is an elegantly simple image you just gave us for a very...
ahh... "tempremental" force of nature.

Thanks for the smile!

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