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A Variety Of Questions, If I May

 
 
Pete Holland Jr.
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      01-18-2004
Hey, everybody!

Some general questions about computers, if anyone can help.

1) I was looking over some books at the store today about
programming. Being a total newb, I started looking at "C++
For Dummies", and it came with a "GNU compiler". What does
GNU stand for, and does this compiler mean it will take what
I make and turn it into code that will run on a computer
without this compiler installed?

1a) Is this an actual C++ programming utility, or just a
"sampler" and I need to buy an actual full-version to get
things done? It seems a bit far fetched that VStudio costs
so much but here's a book and programming utility for $25.

2) Will a C++ program, once compiled, run in DOS mode or
only in a Windows environment?

3) Likewise, can I write a program like a game that will
also run on a Linux machine?

4) A question about Linux--one book came with Red Hat
Fedora. One guy told me he had heard that, to run Linux,
you sort of renew your subscription to it. Every year, you
log in and kick in cash, you get updated software, and off
you go. Is this true?

5) Supposing I opt to go with Linux and Windows both so I
can work and play my games. I heard that by partitioning my
hard drive, I can basically make, say, an 80G into two 40's,
and the partitions will be treated as seperate drives. Is
there a way to repartition without losing my data on the
drive, or do I need to make a backup and install that?

6) Of the programming tutorials I saw, I saw BASIC, Java,
C++, and Visual BASIC. I've already dismissed BASIC, what
about the other three? Can they all be used for general
programming?

Thanks for your help.

Dobre utka,
Pete Holland Jr.

 
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Ghostmaster
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      01-18-2004
Pete Holland Jr. wrote:
: Hey, everybody!
:
: Some general questions about computers, if anyone can help.

<snip>
:
: Thanks for your help.
:
: Dobre utka,
: Pete Holland Jr.


Google is your friend!
http://searchwin2000.techtarget.com/...211824,00.html

So is this website! http://whatis.techtarget.com/

--
Get those creative juices flowing here is your chance to create a 30
second commercial movie file for your favorite Operating System. Be
Creative: http://learningpc4beginners.com/foru...forum.php?f=26


 
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B.Al.Zeebub
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      01-18-2004
On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 01:41:48 -0600, Pete Holland Jr. pecked at a keyboard
in panic:
I won't reply to all the questions becuase I don't do programming.
however...
>1) I was looking over some books at the store today about programming.
>Being a total newb, I started looking at "C++ For Dummies", and it came
>with a "GNU compiler". What does GNU stand for, and does this compiler
>mean it will take what I make and turn it into code that will run on a
>computer without this compiler installed?


http://www.gnu.org/

> 3) Likewise, can I write a program like a game that will
> also run on a Linux machine?


Yes.

> 4) A question about Linux--one book came with Red Hat
> Fedora. One guy told me he had heard that, to run Linux,
> you sort of renew your subscription to it. Every year, you
> log in and kick in cash, you get updated software, and off
> you go. Is this true?


Not quite. Linux distributions can be downloaded free of charge. You can
buy boxed CDs of Linux distributions from the vendors that come with
thousands of software packages. Software and security updates are
available from the Linux distributors' website. You can also 'subscribe'
to a distribution and get extra goodies.

http://www.linuxiso.org/
http://www.distrowatch.com/

> 5) Supposing I opt to go with Linux and Windows both so I
> can work and play my games. I heard that by partitioning my
> hard drive, I can basically make, say, an 80G into two 40's,
> and the partitions will be treated as seperate drives. Is
> there a way to repartition without losing my data on the
> drive, or do I need to make a backup and install that?


Er, er you make backups regularly anyway, don't you??? hmmmm...
Dual booting is easy to set up with Mandrake Linux or Suse Linux. Just
make sure you do that backup first with something like a drive imaging
program first. You can also take Linux for a test drive to see if you like
it without having to install anything.

http://tinyurl.com/247te
http://www.knoppix.org/
http://www.mandrakesoft.com/products/mandrakemove/
Suse live evaluation CD ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/
--
B.Al.Zeebub
Registered Linux User #339345
Defenestrate Windows!

 
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Hywel Jenkins
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      01-18-2004
In article <iMqOb.374$(E-Mail Removed)>, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> Hey, everybody!
>
> Some general questions about computers, if anyone can help.
>
> 1) I was looking over some books at the store today about
> programming. Being a total newb, I started looking at "C++
> For Dummies", and it came with a "GNU compiler". What does
> GNU stand for, and does this compiler mean it will take what
> I make and turn it into code that will run on a computer
> without this compiler installed?


GNU is a recursive acronym: "Gnu's Not Unix". Yes, the compiled program
will run on a computer that doesn't have GNU C++ installed.


> 1a) Is this an actual C++ programming utility, or just a
> "sampler" and I need to buy an actual full-version to get
> things done?


It's probrably the full thing. You can get it from http://www.gnu.org/
if it isn't.


> It seems a bit far fetched that VStudio costs
> so much but here's a book and programming utility for $25.


The GNU range of software is free. Read the GPL for more information
because the licensing of software you've written with it may not suit
you.


> 2) Will a C++ program, once compiled, run in DOS mode or
> only in a Windows environment?


That depends on how you compile it.


> 3) Likewise, can I write a program like a game that will
> also run on a Linux machine?


With C++? That depends. If you write your game for MS Windows, with
Windows functionality, it won't compile for Linux. OTOH, if it's just a
text-based CLI game, it may well run on both.


> 4) A question about Linux--one book came with Red Hat
> Fedora. One guy told me he had heard that, to run Linux,
> you sort of renew your subscription to it. Every year, you
> log in and kick in cash, you get updated software, and off
> you go. Is this true?


There's more info. at http://fedora.redhat.com/.
http://www.mandrake.com/ is a nice distribution.


> 5) Supposing I opt to go with Linux and Windows both so I
> can work and play my games. I heard that by partitioning my
> hard drive, I can basically make, say, an 80G into two 40's,
> and the partitions will be treated as seperate drives. Is
> there a way to repartition without losing my data on the
> drive, or do I need to make a backup and install that?


You can partition your drive and retain data so long as you have less
that 40GB of data, that is. Linux distributions may have a utility
called FIPS that will do this while the drive is live. I'd certainly
back-up important data, though, as most of the software that comes with
Linux has limited liability and warranty.


> 6) Of the programming tutorials I saw, I saw BASIC, Java,
> C++, and Visual BASIC. I've already dismissed BASIC, what
> about the other three? Can they all be used for general
> programming?


Start with Visual BASIC? You don't "sound" like an experienced
programmer, so it may be a good starting point. Of the others I'd go
for C++. It's faster than Java, and reasonably portable. OTOH, Java
will let you write games for mobile 'phones.

--
Hywel I do not eat quiche
http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/
http://hyweljenkins.co.uk/mfaq.php
 
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Cicero
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-18-2004

"Pete Holland Jr." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:iMqOb.374$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hey, everybody!
>
> Some general questions about computers, if anyone can help.
>

<snipped>

> 6) Of the programming tutorials I saw, I saw BASIC, Java,
> C++, and Visual BASIC. I've already dismissed BASIC,


<snipped>

> Thanks for your help.
>
> Dobre utka,
> Pete Holland Jr.
>

=============
Why have you dismissed Basic? There are many different varieties of Basic
and they are usually a good inexpensive introduction to programming
techniques. Two versions, Gwbasic and Qbasic are well worth looking at
especially Qbasic which has a compiler version (makes *.exe files).

Cic.


 
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why?
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-18-2004

On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 01:41:48 -0600, Pete Holland Jr. wrote:

>Hey, everybody!
>
>Some general questions about computers, if anyone can help.
>
>1) I was looking over some books at the store today about
>programming. Being a total newb, I started looking at "C++
>For Dummies", and it came with a "GNU compiler". What does

<snip>

>1a) Is this an actual C++ programming utility, or just a
>"sampler" and I need to buy an actual full-version to get
>things done? It seems a bit far fetched that VStudio costs
>so much but here's a book and programming utility for $25.


For Linux, it comes with C++ compiler, during install simply select the
appropriate development tools options.

If you need a C++ compiler for DOS/Command prompt try
http://www.delorie.com/djgpp/
(see help section for creating Windows based apps)

Also see the cygwin stuff
http://www.cygwin.com/
# Cygwin is a Linux-like environment for Windows. It consists of two
parts: A DLL (cygwin1.dll) which acts as a Linux emulation layer
providing substantial Linux API functionality.
# A collection of tools, which provide Linux look and feel.

<snip>

>4) A question about Linux--one book came with Red Hat
>Fedora. One guy told me he had heard that, to run Linux,
>you sort of renew your subscription to it. Every year, you
>log in and kick in cash, you get updated software, and off
>you go. Is this true?


Don't know about Fedora yet, haven't swapped fully over since RH Linux
support expired and the change to the 'Enterprise' line.

Basically until a few months ago, the update system had several options.

1. Download updates from one of the many public mirrors. Depending on
importance of update, time to mirror across sites, heavy access you
could not get the update for days.

2. Register your system on the RedHat Network, basic info including list
of packages you get email notification and a small survey to fill in
ocassionally to continue the free registration.

2a) As 1 but off the RH servers, again subject to public demand.
2b) Pay a fairly small yearly fee to gain access to priority downloads.

I think Fedora still has the basic free registration, simply to gather
system info so it knows which packages/updates you have/need.

The Fedora updates are available off many public FTP mirrors, so it's
simply a case of downloading them and burning to CD.

You can still go for the supported options via,
http://www.redhat.com/software/
or the not supported by RH
http://fedora.redhat.com/
see the update options.

<snip>

Me
 
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