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Broadband + Router - Recommendations

 
 
Evil T
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      01-12-2004
Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...

1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)

Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines together.
Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.

Which router etc would you recommend?

Thank you for any help!


--
Evil T


 
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Steve Freides
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      01-12-2004
"Evil T" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:btutkf$k0e$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
>
> 1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
> 1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
>
> Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines together.
> Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
>
> Which router etc would you recommend?


Almost any router that supports your type of broadband should work for you
as a replacment for what you now have. If not, you can plug in the new
router on your side of the existing cable/dsl modem. Once the router can
talk to your internet service provider, all you need to do is set it up as a
DHCP server (many come pre-configured this way, anyway) and you should be
good to go from both machine. Such routers can easily be bought with up to
8 ports on them so that you can connect each computer via Cat V cable
directly to the router - and they're usually less than $100, often less than
$50 these days.

What does your ISP tell you about using multiple machines? Some ISP's don't
allow this and takes steps to make it difficult to implement.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


> Thank you for any help!
>
>
> --
> Evil T
>
>



 
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Rick Merrill
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-12-2004
Evil T wrote:

> Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
>
> 1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
> 1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
>
> Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines together.
> Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
>
> Which router etc would you recommend?


LinkSys is my preference. As long as you only use the machines
for your own family, the ISP will not have any complaint, even
if you tell them about it - just do not ask them to debug your
LAN! - RM

 
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Evil T
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Posts: n/a
 
      01-12-2004
Steve Freides wrote:
> "Evil T" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:btutkf$k0e$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
>>
>> 1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
>> 1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
>>
>> Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines
>> together. Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
>>
>> Which router etc would you recommend?

>
> Almost any router that supports your type of broadband should work
> for you as a replacment for what you now have. If not, you can plug
> in the new router on your side of the existing cable/dsl modem. Once
> the router can talk to your internet service provider, all you need
> to do is set it up as a DHCP server (many come pre-configured this
> way, anyway) and you should be good to go from both machine. Such
> routers can easily be bought with up to 8 ports on them so that you
> can connect each computer via Cat V cable directly to the router -
> and they're usually less than $100, often less than $50 these days.
>
> What does your ISP tell you about using multiple machines? Some
> ISP's don't allow this and takes steps to make it difficult to
> implement.
>


Thanks!

The ISP will only allow one machine on.

It's only machines in the house, 2 maybe 3 machines at most.

The connections from the ADSL are my main problem I think. There's the USB
connection to the PC and a normal telephone cable to the 'internet'. No
Ethernet ports on the modem.

Would an all-in-one product be the bets bet? i.e. modem, router combo?


 
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Tergiversative
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-13-2004
Evil T wrote:
> Steve Freides wrote:
>
>>"Evil T" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>news:btutkf$k0e$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>>>Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
>>>
>>>1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
>>>1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
>>>
>>>Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines
>>>together. Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
>>>
>>>Which router etc would you recommend?

>>
>>Almost any router that supports your type of broadband should work
>>for you as a replacment for what you now have. If not, you can plug
>>in the new router on your side of the existing cable/dsl modem. Once
>>the router can talk to your internet service provider, all you need
>>to do is set it up as a DHCP server (many come pre-configured this
>>way, anyway) and you should be good to go from both machine. Such
>>routers can easily be bought with up to 8 ports on them so that you
>>can connect each computer via Cat V cable directly to the router -
>>and they're usually less than $100, often less than $50 these days.
>>
>>What does your ISP tell you about using multiple machines? Some
>>ISP's don't allow this and takes steps to make it difficult to
>>implement.
>>

> Thanks!
>
> The ISP will only allow one machine on.
>
> It's only machines in the house, 2 maybe 3 machines at most.
>
> The connections from the ADSL are my main problem I think. There's the USB
> connection to the PC and a normal telephone cable to the 'internet'. No
> Ethernet ports on the modem.
>
> Would an all-in-one product be the bets bet? i.e. modem, router combo?


The ISP may only allow one machine, but they really do NOT know if you
have two hooked to a router. In order to know that, they'd have to be
able to probe your LAN behind the router, and that would be a "security
exploit". The router is used to present one single address to the outside
world, *including* the ISP. And I don't believe there is an ISP around
that bans use of routers ... since they provide security even if you use
only one system.

You can get a nice, cheap, home-quality router by Belkin, D-Link, Linksys,
others. I would avoid the router-modem combos. Watch for sales, and
you'll see them for $20-40 at major office supply & computer stores.

The only thing you have to keep in mind is that if you have a problem that
requires you to call the ISP's tech support, you should first unhook one
machine from the router & plug directly into the modem (in place of the
router) as otherwise they will often try to blame any problem on the router.

-- DE

 
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Steve Freides
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-14-2004
"Tergiversative" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Evil T wrote:
> > Steve Freides wrote:
> >
> >>"Evil T" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>news:btutkf$k0e$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>
> >>>Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
> >>>
> >>>1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
> >>>1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
> >>>
> >>>Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines
> >>>together. Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
> >>>
> >>>Which router etc would you recommend?
> >>
> >>Almost any router that supports your type of broadband should work
> >>for you as a replacment for what you now have. If not, you can plug
> >>in the new router on your side of the existing cable/dsl modem. Once
> >>the router can talk to your internet service provider, all you need
> >>to do is set it up as a DHCP server (many come pre-configured this
> >>way, anyway) and you should be good to go from both machine. Such
> >>routers can easily be bought with up to 8 ports on them so that you
> >>can connect each computer via Cat V cable directly to the router -
> >>and they're usually less than $100, often less than $50 these days.
> >>
> >>What does your ISP tell you about using multiple machines? Some
> >>ISP's don't allow this and takes steps to make it difficult to
> >>implement.
> >>

> > Thanks!
> >
> > The ISP will only allow one machine on.
> >
> > It's only machines in the house, 2 maybe 3 machines at most.
> >
> > The connections from the ADSL are my main problem I think. There's the

USB
> > connection to the PC and a normal telephone cable to the 'internet'. No
> > Ethernet ports on the modem.
> >
> > Would an all-in-one product be the bets bet? i.e. modem, router combo?

>
> The ISP may only allow one machine, but they really do NOT know if you
> have two hooked to a router. In order to know that, they'd have to be
> able to probe your LAN behind the router, and that would be a "security
> exploit". The router is used to present one single address to the outside
> world, *including* the ISP. And I don't believe there is an ISP around
> that bans use of routers ... since they provide security even if you use
> only one system.
>
> You can get a nice, cheap, home-quality router by Belkin, D-Link, Linksys,
> others. I would avoid the router-modem combos. Watch for sales, and
> you'll see them for $20-40 at major office supply & computer stores.
>
> The only thing you have to keep in mind is that if you have a problem that
> requires you to call the ISP's tech support, you should first unhook one
> machine from the router & plug directly into the modem (in place of the
> router) as otherwise they will often try to blame any problem on the

router.

Some ISP's take down your NIC MAC address - you can use that machine and
that machine only.

At least they used to.

-S-
http://www.kbnj.com


 
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Krft
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-14-2004
Steve Freides wrote:
> "Tergiversative" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
> message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> Evil T wrote:
>>> Steve Freides wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Evil T" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:btutkf$k0e$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>
>>>>> Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
>>>>>
>>>>> 1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
>>>>> 1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
>>>>>
>>>>> Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines
>>>>> together. Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
>>>>>
>>>>> Which router etc would you recommend?
>>>>
>>>> Almost any router that supports your type of broadband should
>>>> work for you as a replacment for what you now have. If not, you
>>>> can plug in the new router on your side of the existing
>>>> cable/dsl modem. Once the router can talk to your internet
>>>> service provider, all you need to do is set it up as a DHCP
>>>> server (many come pre-configured this way, anyway) and you
>>>> should be good to go from both machine. Such routers can easily
>>>> be bought with up to 8 ports on them so that you can connect
>>>> each computer via Cat V cable directly to the router - and
>>>> they're usually less than $100, often less than $50 these days.
>>>>
>>>> What does your ISP tell you about using multiple machines? Some
>>>> ISP's don't allow this and takes steps to make it difficult to
>>>> implement.
>>>>
>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>> The ISP will only allow one machine on.
>>>
>>> It's only machines in the house, 2 maybe 3 machines at most.
>>>
>>> The connections from the ADSL are my main problem I think.
>>> There's the USB connection to the PC and a normal telephone cable
>>> to the 'internet'. No Ethernet ports on the modem.
>>>
>>> Would an all-in-one product be the bets bet? i.e. modem, router
>>> combo?

>>
>> The ISP may only allow one machine, but they really do NOT know if
>> you have two hooked to a router. In order to know that, they'd
>> have to be able to probe your LAN behind the router, and that
>> would be a "security exploit". The router is used to present one
>> single address to the outside world, *including* the ISP. And I
>> don't believe there is an ISP around that bans use of routers ...
>> since they provide security even if you use only one system.
>>
>> You can get a nice, cheap, home-quality router by Belkin, D-Link,
>> Linksys, others. I would avoid the router-modem combos. Watch
>> for sales, and you'll see them for $20-40 at major office supply &
>> computer stores.
>>
>> The only thing you have to keep in mind is that if you have a
>> problem that requires you to call the ISP's tech support, you
>> should first unhook one machine from the router & plug directly
>> into the modem (in place of the router) as otherwise they will
>> often try to blame any problem on the router.

>
> Some ISP's take down your NIC MAC address - you can use that
> machine and that machine only.
>
> At least they used to.
>
> -S-
> http://www.kbnj.com


Then you purchase one of the many routers which allow you to clone the MAC
adress. There is always a way round if you can be bothered to look...


 
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Tergiversative
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-15-2004
"Kr��������������� ���������������� �����������" wrote:
> Steve Freides wrote:
>
>>"Tergiversative" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>Evil T wrote:
>>>>Steve Freides wrote:
>>>>>"Evil T" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>>>news:btutkf$k0e$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Any recommendations etc would be a great help, details below...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>1 Desktop machine - Win2k (All patches)
>>>>>>1 Laptop = WinXP (All Patches)
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Finally got broadband and would like to connect the two machines
>>>>>>together. Don't want to use wireless, CAT5 cableing preferred.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Which router etc would you recommend?
>>>>>
>>>>>Almost any router that supports your type of broadband should
>>>>>work for you as a replacment for what you now have. If not, you
>>>>>can plug in the new router on your side of the existing
>>>>>cable/dsl modem. Once the router can talk to your internet
>>>>>service provider, all you need to do is set it up as a DHCP
>>>>>server (many come pre-configured this way, anyway) and you
>>>>>should be good to go from both machine. Such routers can easily
>>>>>be bought with up to 8 ports on them so that you can connect
>>>>>each computer via Cat V cable directly to the router - and
>>>>>they're usually less than $100, often less than $50 these days.
>>>>>
>>>>>What does your ISP tell you about using multiple machines? Some
>>>>>ISP's don't allow this and takes steps to make it difficult to
>>>>>implement.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Thanks!
>>>>
>>>>The ISP will only allow one machine on.
>>>>
>>>>It's only machines in the house, 2 maybe 3 machines at most.
>>>>
>>>>The connections from the ADSL are my main problem I think.
>>>>There's the USB connection to the PC and a normal telephone cable
>>>>to the 'internet'. No Ethernet ports on the modem.
>>>>
>>>>Would an all-in-one product be the bets bet? i.e. modem, router
>>>>combo?
>>>
>>>The ISP may only allow one machine, but they really do NOT know if
>>>you have two hooked to a router. In order to know that, they'd
>>>have to be able to probe your LAN behind the router, and that
>>>would be a "security exploit". The router is used to present one
>>>single address to the outside world, *including* the ISP. And I
>>>don't believe there is an ISP around that bans use of routers ...
>>>since they provide security even if you use only one system.
>>>
>>>You can get a nice, cheap, home-quality router by Belkin, D-Link,
>>>Linksys, others. I would avoid the router-modem combos. Watch
>>>for sales, and you'll see them for $20-40 at major office supply &
>>>computer stores.
>>>
>>>The only thing you have to keep in mind is that if you have a
>>>problem that requires you to call the ISP's tech support, you
>>>should first unhook one machine from the router & plug directly
>>>into the modem (in place of the router) as otherwise they will
>>>often try to blame any problem on the router.

>>
>>Some ISP's take down your NIC MAC address - you can use that
>>machine and that machine only.
>>
>>At least they used to.
>>
>>-S-
>>http://www.kbnj.com

>
> Then you purchase one of the many routers which allow you to clone the MAC
> adress. There is always a way round if you can be bothered to look...


IAC, what they do now is take down the MODEM's info ... because even a
single-machine setup is better off without that direct exposure of the
external IP. And they sometimes do need the modem info not just to
activate the connection (and only that one connection) but also for use
when they want to know if they can "see" your modem, if you are having
connection issues.

-- DE

 
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