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What day of the week is Jan 1st 1,000,000AD ?

 
 
Trevor Smith
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      11-04-2003
Insomniacs have some strange thoughts at 4am; at least I did, this
morning...

Ok, you *can* just extrapolate the Gregorian calendar - but that isn't
completely accurate and will probably be superseded by something more
accurate in the next million years! A little research shows that the USSR
actually had a more accurate calendar than the Gregorian (which would only
make a difference over 1000's of years) and of course astronomers keep
adding in 'leap seconds' now and then, to allow for variations in the speed
of rotation of the Earth (better known as a 'day'!) - but they'd mount up
over a million years, wouldn't they.

Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in perpetuity) is
adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the week IS Jan 1st
1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?

Trevor.

PS at least I didn't ask a *difficult* question like "what day of the week
was Jan 1st 1,000,000 BCE ?!!


 
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The Old Sourdough
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      11-04-2003
On Tue, 04 Nov 2003 22:02:24 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind boggled
at the following statement by Trevor Smith in message
news:bo97lg$njd$(E-Mail Removed)

snip
> Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
> winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in perpetuity) is
> adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the week IS Jan 1st
> 1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?
>
> Trevor.
>
> PS at least I didn't ask a *difficult* question like "what day of the week
> was Jan 1st 1,000,000 BCE ?!!
>
>

Somehow I doubt that the succesors to the human race, which in all
likelihood will probably be cockroaches, will really care what day of the
week January 1st is in 1,000,000 A.D.


--
The Old Sourdough
No of SETI units returned: 2280
Processing time: 4 years, 169 days, 7 hours.
(Total hours: 39103)
www.setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu
 
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Trevor Smith
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      11-04-2003

"The Old Sourdough" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Xns9429B3F2C7411Bcx25Yti54oP@216.196.97.132.. .
> On Tue, 04 Nov 2003 22:02:24 GMT in 24hoursupport.helpdesk, my mind

boggled
> at the following statement by Trevor Smith in message
> news:bo97lg$njd$(E-Mail Removed)
>
> snip
> > Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
> > winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in perpetuity)

is
> > adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the week IS Jan 1st
> > 1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?
> >
> > Trevor.
> >
> > PS at least I didn't ask a *difficult* question like "what day of the

week
> > was Jan 1st 1,000,000 BCE ?!!
> >
> >

> Somehow I doubt that the succesors to the human race, which in all
> likelihood will probably be cockroaches, will really care what day of the
> week January 1st is in 1,000,000 A.D.
>


Good answer - philosophical - along the lines of 'does a falling tree in
the middle of the wood make a sound, if there's no-one round to hear it'.
But perhaps a highly evolved descendant cockroach archaeologist might ask
the question?

Trevor


 
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trout
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      11-04-2003
Trevor Smith wrote:

<snip>

> Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
> winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in
> perpetuity) is adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the
> week IS Jan 1st 1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?
>
> Trevor.


"troutday". To be universally adopted in May, 2024 as the correct
designation for *every* day of the week; following my successful
campaign for Planetary Despot.
Prepare now for a viciously better Tomorrow.
--
"But it would be nice if you tried to act surprised at the official
announcement."


 
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Ralph Mann
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      11-04-2003
Trevor Smith said:

> Insomniacs have some strange thoughts at 4am; at least I did, this
> morning...
>
> Ok, you *can* just extrapolate the Gregorian calendar - but that isn't
> completely accurate and will probably be superseded by something more
> accurate in the next million years! A little research shows that the USSR
> actually had a more accurate calendar than the Gregorian (which would only
> make a difference over 1000's of years) and of course astronomers keep
> adding in 'leap seconds' now and then, to allow for variations in the speed
> of rotation of the Earth (better known as a 'day'!) - but they'd mount up
> over a million years, wouldn't they.
>
> Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
> winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in perpetuity) is
> adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the week IS Jan 1st
> 1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?
>
> Trevor.
>
> PS at least I didn't ask a *difficult* question like "what day of the week
> was Jan 1st 1,000,000 BCE ?!!


1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the total by 7

if the resulting number ends with the following fractions :-
..142857142 = Monday
..285714285 = Tuesday
..428571428 = Wednesday
..571428571 = Thursday
..714285714 = Friday
..857142857 = Saturday
..0 = Sunday



 
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Ralph Mann
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      11-04-2003
Ralph Mann said:

> Trevor Smith said:
>
>> Insomniacs have some strange thoughts at 4am; at least I did, this
>> morning...
>>
>> Ok, you *can* just extrapolate the Gregorian calendar - but that isn't
>> completely accurate and will probably be superseded by something more
>> accurate in the next million years! A little research shows that the USSR
>> actually had a more accurate calendar than the Gregorian (which would only
>> make a difference over 1000's of years) and of course astronomers keep
>> adding in 'leap seconds' now and then, to allow for variations in the speed
>> of rotation of the Earth (better known as a 'day'!) - but they'd mount up
>> over a million years, wouldn't they.
>>
>> Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
>> winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in perpetuity) is
>> adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the week IS Jan 1st
>> 1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?
>>
>> Trevor.
>>
>> PS at least I didn't ask a *difficult* question like "what day of the week
>> was Jan 1st 1,000,000 BCE ?!!

>
> 1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the total by 7


Sorry, that should be minus 366 days.

>
> if the resulting number ends with the following fractions :-
> .142857142 = Monday
> .285714285 = Tuesday
> .428571428 = Wednesday
> .571428571 = Thursday
> .714285714 = Friday
> .857142857 = Saturday
> .0 = Sunday




 
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Trevor Smith
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      11-04-2003
>
> 1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the total

by 7
>
> if the resulting number ends with the following fractions :-
> .142857142 = Monday
> .285714285 = Tuesday
> .428571428 = Wednesday
> .571428571 = Thursday
> .714285714 = Friday
> .857142857 = Saturday
> .0 = Sunday
>


Good grief - that's the Julian calendar! Where have you been for the last
400 years?

Trevor


 
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Ralph Mann
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      11-04-2003
Trevor Smith said:

>> 1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the total by
>> 7
>>
>> if the resulting number ends with the following fractions :-
>> .142857142 = Monday
>> .285714285 = Tuesday
>> .428571428 = Wednesday
>> .571428571 = Thursday
>> .714285714 = Friday
>> .857142857 = Saturday
>> .0 = Sunday
>>

>
> Good grief - that's the Julian calendar! Where have you been for the last
> 400 years?
>
> Trevor


I can only calculate using an existing calendar, as I don't know what will be
created in the future.
It took me a few seconds to work out the formula, so let's see you have a go now



 
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Trevor Smith
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      11-04-2003

"trout" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bo9aql$1b9v2j$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de...
> Trevor Smith wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
> > Assuming an 'accurate' calendar (which I define as one which keeps the
> > winter solstice for the Northern hemisphere in December in
> > perpetuity) is adopted within the next 1000 years, what day of the
> > week IS Jan 1st 1,000,000AD? Does the question even have a meaning?
> >
> > Trevor.

>
> "troutday". To be universally adopted in May, 2024 as the correct
> designation for *every* day of the week; following my successful
> campaign for Planetary Despot.
> Prepare now for a viciously better Tomorrow.
> --
> "But it would be nice if you tried to act surprised at the official
> announcement."
>

I'll try.

Trevor


 
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Ralph Mann
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Posts: n/a
 
      11-04-2003
Ralph Mann said:

> Trevor Smith said:
>
>>> 1,000,000 x 365 days, plus 250,000 days, minus 365 days, divide the total by
>>> 7
>>>
>>> if the resulting number ends with the following fractions :-
>>> .142857142 = Monday
>>> .285714285 = Tuesday
>>> .428571428 = Wednesday
>>> .571428571 = Thursday
>>> .714285714 = Friday
>>> .857142857 = Saturday
>>> .0 = Sunday
>>>

>>
>> Good grief - that's the Julian calendar! Where have you been for the last
>> 400 years?
>>
>> Trevor

>
> I can only calculate using an existing calendar, as I don't know what will be
> created in the future.
> It took me a few seconds to work out the formula, so let's see you have a go
> now


Besides, there will probably only ever be 7 days in a week, so regardless of how
calendars are recalulated to compensate, whether with a leap year every 2 years
or a leap century, or even a leap millennium, ther important calculation is the
"divide by 7".


 
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