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Magnetised TV

 
 
Bill Schowengerdt
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      08-15-2003
On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 19:58:37 +0100, While I was using pressure to stop
the bleeding, "Kenny" <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
..
>Have you any speakers or anything which generates a magnetic field near the
>TV, if so move them. An old trick which may work is pick up the TV and turn
>in circles in the same spot as many times as you can, watch you don't get
>dizzy and drop it! This effectively uses the earth's magnetic field to
>degauss the CRT. Another thing to try is a large magnet, maybe from an old
>speaker. Hold it close to the screen and make circles with it slowly
>drawing it away from the screen. TV engineers use a degaussing wand for
>this problem. The degauss function in a TV should start when it is powered
>on, unlike a monitor which is usually done manually, this part of the TV
>could be faulty.


If you read the OP you will discover that he said the colored areas
change with changes in location of the TV. This means it is not
magnetized. It is being influenced by some outside field.

He can degauss it all he wants, but it will not fix the problem.

To fix the problem he needs to discover the source of the outside
magnetization.

Or, although unlikely, it could be loose focusing magnets or coil on the
crt neck. However, that would not really fit his movement scenario.

 
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Mushroom
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      08-16-2003
Thanks for your advice so far.
I'm trying the manual degauss thing with an old speaker I found.
It's actually very hard to say if it does change rotating the T.V. but I
think it does.
I'm not sure, but sometimes it seems as though the degauss coil does almost
clear the screen, but then the problem gradually but quite quickly returns,
if that makes any sense.
Would this suggest that the coil can't entirely get rid of it?
Good ideas so far, keep them coming!!!


 
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paul s
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      08-16-2003
On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:02:50 +0100, Mushroom wrote:

> Thanks for your advice so far.
> I'm trying the manual degauss thing with an old speaker I found.


Well that ain't gonna help, In fact it probably made the problem worse by
distorting the shadow-mask.

> It's actually very hard to say if it does change rotating the T.V. but I
> think it does.
> I'm not sure, but sometimes it seems as though the degauss coil does almost
> clear the screen, but then the problem gradually but quite quickly returns,
> if that makes any sense.
> Would this suggest that the coil can't entirely get rid of it?
> Good ideas so far, keep them coming!!!


If the shadow-mask was distorted with a strong non-alternating magnetic
field, then a new tube (CRT) would be needed. Usually this exceeds the
cost of a completely new TV.

Correct degaussing is always done with a degauss coil either within the
TV itself or in the repair shop with an AC driven external degaussing
coil/device, usually this is much more powerful than the TV's own deguass
coil.

--
Paul S
----------------------------------------------------------------------
- What is a "free" gift? Aren't all gifts free? -
----------------------------------------------------------------------

 
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paul s
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      08-16-2003
On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 23:20:45 -0500, Bill Schowengerdt wrote:

> On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 19:58:37 +0100, While I was using pressure to stop
> the bleeding, "Kenny" <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
> .
>>Have you any speakers or anything which generates a magnetic field near the
>>TV, if so move them. An old trick which may work is pick up the TV and turn
>>in circles in the same spot as many times as you can, watch you don't get
>>dizzy and drop it! This effectively uses the earth's magnetic field to
>>degauss the CRT. Another thing to try is a large magnet, maybe from an old
>>speaker. Hold it close to the screen and make circles with it slowly
>>drawing it away from the screen. TV engineers use a degaussing wand for
>>this problem. The degauss function in a TV should start when it is powered
>>on, unlike a monitor which is usually done manually, this part of the TV
>>could be faulty.

>
> If you read the OP you will discover that he said the colored areas
> change with changes in location of the TV. This means it is not
> magnetized. It is being influenced by some outside field.
>
> He can degauss it all he wants, but it will not fix the problem.
>
> To fix the problem he needs to discover the source of the outside
> magnetization.
>
> Or, although unlikely, it could be loose focusing magnets or coil on the
> crt neck.


It's a common fault on older Sonys, with the purity magnets falling of
the yoke.

> However, that would not really fit his movement scenario.


The earth's magnetic field can have some effect on TVs and monitors. I saw
the effect myself when I rotated my own monitor 90degrees to the vertical,
to use it in portrait mode for a while. The purity went completely
hay-wire, but was cured by pressing the degauss button a couple of times.
And there was difinately no man-made magnetic fields or large metal
objects near it.

--
Paul S
----------------------------------------------------------------------
- Heisenberg _may_ have slept here -
----------------------------------------------------------------------

 
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Bill Schowengerdt
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-17-2003
On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:24:07 GMT, While I was using pressure to stop the
bleeding, paul s <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
..
>On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:02:50 +0100, Mushroom wrote:
>
>> Thanks for your advice so far.
>> I'm trying the manual degauss thing with an old speaker I found.

>
>Well that ain't gonna help, In fact it probably made the problem worse by
>distorting the shadow-mask.
>
>> It's actually very hard to say if it does change rotating the T.V. but I
>> think it does.
>> I'm not sure, but sometimes it seems as though the degauss coil does almost
>> clear the screen, but then the problem gradually but quite quickly returns,
>> if that makes any sense.
>> Would this suggest that the coil can't entirely get rid of it?
>> Good ideas so far, keep them coming!!!

>
>If the shadow-mask was distorted with a strong non-alternating magnetic
>field, then a new tube (CRT) would be needed. Usually this exceeds the
>cost of a completely new TV.
>
>Correct degaussing is always done with a degauss coil either within the
>TV itself or in the repair shop with an AC driven external degaussing
>coil/device, usually this is much more powerful than the TV's own deguass
>coil.


True

I have no idea how much a shop would change for that, however, if you are
into such things, they are very easy to make your own. I made one for my
shop 30 years ago without even looking it up in a book.

No doubt instructions can be found on the internet

 
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Scribner
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-18-2003
On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 22:16:29 -0500, Bill Schowengerdt
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:24:07 GMT, While I was using pressure to stop the
>bleeding, paul s <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
>.
>>On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:02:50 +0100, Mushroom wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks for your advice so far.
>>> I'm trying the manual degauss thing with an old speaker I found.

>>
>>Well that ain't gonna help, In fact it probably made the problem worse by
>>distorting the shadow-mask.
>>
>>> It's actually very hard to say if it does change rotating the T.V. but I
>>> think it does.
>>> I'm not sure, but sometimes it seems as though the degauss coil does almost
>>> clear the screen, but then the problem gradually but quite quickly returns,
>>> if that makes any sense.
>>> Would this suggest that the coil can't entirely get rid of it?
>>> Good ideas so far, keep them coming!!!

>>
>>If the shadow-mask was distorted with a strong non-alternating magnetic
>>field, then a new tube (CRT) would be needed. Usually this exceeds the
>>cost of a completely new TV.
>>
>>Correct degaussing is always done with a degauss coil either within the
>>TV itself or in the repair shop with an AC driven external degaussing
>>coil/device, usually this is much more powerful than the TV's own deguass
>>coil.

>
>True
>
>I have no idea how much a shop would change for that, however, if you are
>into such things, they are very easy to make your own. I made one for my
>shop 30 years ago without even looking it up in a book.
>
> No doubt instructions can be found on the internet



I bought one at Radio Shack a long time ago.
 
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Sir Horatio William Bernhart Wagglesworth III, Esq.
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-21-2003

"Bill Schowengerdt" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:24:07 GMT, While I was using pressure to stop the
> bleeding, paul s <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
> .
> >On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:02:50 +0100, Mushroom wrote:
> >
> >> Thanks for your advice so far.
> >> I'm trying the manual degauss thing with an old speaker I found.

> >
> >Well that ain't gonna help, In fact it probably made the problem worse by
> >distorting the shadow-mask.
> >
> >> It's actually very hard to say if it does change rotating the T.V. but

I
> >> think it does.
> >> I'm not sure, but sometimes it seems as though the degauss coil does

almost
> >> clear the screen, but then the problem gradually but quite quickly

returns,
> >> if that makes any sense.
> >> Would this suggest that the coil can't entirely get rid of it?
> >> Good ideas so far, keep them coming!!!

> >
> >If the shadow-mask was distorted with a strong non-alternating magnetic
> >field, then a new tube (CRT) would be needed. Usually this exceeds the
> >cost of a completely new TV.
> >
> >Correct degaussing is always done with a degauss coil either within the
> >TV itself or in the repair shop with an AC driven external degaussing
> >coil/device, usually this is much more powerful than the TV's own deguass
> >coil.

>
> True
>
> I have no idea how much a shop would change for that, ...


<snip>

That's because you have your head up your ass. You must enjoy the view;
it's there so often.


 
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Ian Bethell
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-21-2003
Find an old local back/side street TV repair shop that has a load of old
second hand TV's for sale in the window.... they will most likely have a
Degausser.... a hand-held thing the size of an LP that plugs into the
mains.... it's just a quick job so probably wouldn't even charge you a penny
if you managed to get your TV to them.... or if they're even more generous,
may let you borrow the device over night.



"Sir Horatio William Bernhart Wagglesworth III, Esq."
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:GPY0b.408$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Bill Schowengerdt" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:24:07 GMT, While I was using pressure to stop the
> > bleeding, paul s <(E-Mail Removed)> posted:
> > .
> > >On Sat, 16 Aug 2003 10:02:50 +0100, Mushroom wrote:
> > >
> > >> Thanks for your advice so far.
> > >> I'm trying the manual degauss thing with an old speaker I found.
> > >
> > >Well that ain't gonna help, In fact it probably made the problem worse

by
> > >distorting the shadow-mask.
> > >
> > >> It's actually very hard to say if it does change rotating the T.V.

but
> I
> > >> think it does.
> > >> I'm not sure, but sometimes it seems as though the degauss coil does

> almost
> > >> clear the screen, but then the problem gradually but quite quickly

> returns,
> > >> if that makes any sense.
> > >> Would this suggest that the coil can't entirely get rid of it?
> > >> Good ideas so far, keep them coming!!!
> > >
> > >If the shadow-mask was distorted with a strong non-alternating magnetic
> > >field, then a new tube (CRT) would be needed. Usually this exceeds the
> > >cost of a completely new TV.
> > >
> > >Correct degaussing is always done with a degauss coil either within the
> > >TV itself or in the repair shop with an AC driven external degaussing
> > >coil/device, usually this is much more powerful than the TV's own

deguass
> > >coil.

> >
> > True
> >
> > I have no idea how much a shop would change for that, ...

>
> <snip>
>
> That's because you have your head up your ass. You must enjoy the view;
> it's there so often.
>
>



 
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