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per-character font base adjustment

 
 
Safalra
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      08-17-2005
paramucho wrote:
> On 16 Aug 2005 10:51:54 -0700, "Safalra" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >I suspect however that now the original poster has an answer that's to
> >his satisfaction he won't care if he's been asking the wrong question
> >all along, and he'll never find out that there's a far better solution
> >to his problems. I hope to be proved wrong, of course, but Usenet has
> >made me cynical.

>
> [snip]
> To come to your point: my main activity is writing about music. I use
> block and in-line examples -- thousands of them. The *right* question
> that I should have asked is: how do I efficiently render music in
> HTML, but I don't think there's anything out there to help me in a
> practical sense. I compromise with some crude techniques and that's
> where I use the baseline manipulation. I do my writing in an RTF app
> where I use the baseline technique, so I'll put together a converter
> to produce the HTML (there's a common template for the documents).


The problem here is that HTML was designed to mark-up text, not music.
Using CSS to shift notes around results in an unintelligible mess on
non-CSS user-agents (or those with CSS bugs). The best way of
marking-up music is disputed, but one way I like is Lilypond. You start
off with some XML:

<music>
\notes \relative c' {
e16-.->a(b gis)a-.->c(d b)c-.->e(f dis)e-.->a(b a)
gis(b e)e,(gis b)b,(e gis)gis,(b e)e,(gis? b e)
}
</music>

And it turns it to a PNG image with a link to a MIDI version. Take a
look at this Wikipedia entry for more:

http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Music_markup#Lilypond

--
Safalra (Stephen Morley)
http://www.safalra.com/hypertext/

 
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Safalra
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      08-17-2005
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
> "Safalra" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > That's a good question. (I'm just pointing that out so that it's clear
> > this post isn't a personal attack, just an attack on pedantry.)

>
> An attack on assumed pedantry, to be exact.


I apologise for misinterpreting your comments. In retrospect I was
rather impolite. Wiio's laws in effect again...

> > and he'll never find out that there's a far better solution
> > to his problems.

>
> Quite possible. After all, we don't know what the problem really is.


It seems my cynicism was unjustified - the original poster has
responded with his true problem. And it seems he's commited to "the
philosophy of HTML". There is hope for us all yet...

--
Safalra (Stephen Morley)
http://www.safalra.com/hypertext/

 
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rf
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      08-17-2005
paramucho wrote:

[snippity snip snip]

> To come to your point:


Phew, at last

> my main activity is writing about music.


What sort of music?

Most guitar music published on the web uses tabs. Google for [guitar tabs].
After a short learning curve these are as easy to read as "real" music,
sometimes easier as they are really a sort of three dimensional picture of
the music: time, string, fret. One can actually see the chords, just like
in real music.

OTOH if you are publishing a violin concerto then all bets are off. You are
better off with a PDF.

I would be most interested in viewing one of your RTF files. URL?

Cheers
Richard.



 
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Jukka K. Korpela
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      08-17-2005
"Safalra" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> The problem here is that HTML was designed to mark-up text, not music.


Indeed, but some notations of music can be regarded as text. After all,
there are even Unicode characters for notes and other symbols used for
writing down music.

> Using CSS to shift notes around results in an unintelligible mess on
> non-CSS user-agents (or those with CSS bugs).


In most cases, yes, but using <sup> and <sub> markup may work in some
cases, though you would probably want to tune the vertical-alignment and
the font-size in CSS. The presentation could still make sense even without
CSS, though there are unavoidably situations where superscripting and
subscripting cannot work as such (character cell browsers, speech browsers,
Braille rendering, search engines). Clever browsers could still tell the
user about superscripting and subscripting.

Some approaches might use (gasp) tables, which might even have structural
meaning in musics notations.

Yet another possibility is Ruby markup, which wasn't really designed for
music but can be used to attach "interlinear annotations" to text (and has
some basic support on IE 6).

--
Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html


 
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