Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > Java > Coldfusion vs. Java

Reply
Thread Tools

Coldfusion vs. Java

 
 
chris
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-16-2006
Hello,

I don't mean to start any flames or such. I work at a company where I'm the
only Java programmer and the rest are developing in CF. This is for inhouse
intranet applications. Some of the management is trying to switch
development over to Java. I was hired on and part of my job is to help
transition them over. While I have nothing against CF, it appears that
there is a huge resistance. I'm using Struts, JSP and Servlets. Here is
what I'm faced with:

"Coldfusion is compiled into Java anyways..."

"Since it's so easy to develop applications in Coldfusion, why would we
want to use something much more difficult to do the same thing."

"You can't pass a recordset and display it. You have to create a bean."
(Speaking of Struts)

Well, anyone have any comments on these statements? I am the lone ranger
here! I know about objected oriented programming and the performance of
Java vs. CF, but those have failed to be convincing arguments.

Thanks,

Chris
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Chris Smith
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-16-2006
chris <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I don't mean to start any flames or such. I work at a company where I'm the
> only Java programmer and the rest are developing in CF. This is for inhouse
> intranet applications. Some of the management is trying to switch
> development over to Java. I was hired on and part of my job is to help
> transition them over. While I have nothing against CF, it appears that
> there is a huge resistance. I'm using Struts, JSP and Servlets. Here is
> what I'm faced with:


What kind of application are you developing? Is it possible that the
resisting programmers are right? If the application is a lot of front
end and very little business logic, then you might justifiably have a
hard time convincing anyone to switch. If they are not right, though,
then you'll be able to find things that are very awkward or difficult in
the existing CF application, and suggest alternatives.

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way To Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Jon Martin Solaas
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-16-2006
chris wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I don't mean to start any flames or such. I work at a company where I'm the
> only Java programmer and the rest are developing in CF. This is for inhouse
> intranet applications. Some of the management is trying to switch
> development over to Java. I was hired on and part of my job is to help
> transition them over. While I have nothing against CF, it appears that
> there is a huge resistance. I'm using Struts, JSP and Servlets. Here is
> what I'm faced with:
>
> "Coldfusion is compiled into Java anyways..."
>
> "Since it's so easy to develop applications in Coldfusion, why would we
> want to use something much more difficult to do the same thing."
>
> "You can't pass a recordset and display it. You have to create a bean."
> (Speaking of Struts)
>
> Well, anyone have any comments on these statements? I am the lone ranger
> here! I know about objected oriented programming and the performance of
> Java vs. CF, but those have failed to be convincing arguments.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Chris


Try to figure out which problems you think will be resolved by
converting from CF to plain j2ee. What would the cost of training all
the cf-developers in j2ee amount to?
 
Reply With Quote
 
none
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2006
chris wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I don't mean to start any flames or such. I work at a company where I'm the
> only Java programmer and the rest are developing in CF. This is for inhouse
> intranet applications. Some of the management is trying to switch
> development over to Java. I was hired on and part of my job is to help
> transition them over. While I have nothing against CF, it appears that
> there is a huge resistance. I'm using Struts, JSP and Servlets. Here is
> what I'm faced with:
>
> "Coldfusion is compiled into Java anyways..."
>
> "Since it's so easy to develop applications in Coldfusion, why would we
> want to use something much more difficult to do the same thing."
>
> "You can't pass a recordset and display it. You have to create a bean."
> (Speaking of Struts)
>
> Well, anyone have any comments on these statements? I am the lone ranger
> here! I know about objected oriented programming and the performance of
> Java vs. CF, but those have failed to be convincing arguments.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Chris

I had similar issues while working for a previous company. One of the
main benefits of CF is it enables developers with little or no coding
and design experience to create web applications quickly (Although the
state of such applications is another matter). There is quite a steep
learning curve for cf developers to move to j2ee if they have no java
experience.
There will be more work involved in creating a j2ee application, with
more files to maintain and more time required for design and
development. However, the benefits include (in my opinion) added
flexibility, increased performance and a more scalable application.

Why not try a compromise? perhaps running the front end of the app in CF
and the business and data access tier in j2ee? It you have the
enterprise CF server it fully supports a version of j2ee as it uses jrun.


Tim
 
Reply With Quote
 
ducnbyu@aol.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2006
Try a What's In It For Them approach. I don't mean necessarily what's
good for the company. "Some managers" have already decided that, right
or wrong, that's management's job so the CF programmers need to present
their case to management not you. It is not your job to change
management's mind so CF programmers are just griping. It is in your
best interest to be sympathetic and understanding though.

Back to What's In It for Them. Right or wrong, they will be getting
Java training and Java job experience at the expense of the company.
The company is willing to invest in their growth. That should be
assuring to them. Otherwise, it sure won't hurt their resumes should
somebody need one.

Why do "some managers" want to make the change? They must have a
business reason. They hate spending money unless there is some
perceived return even if long term? And I'm almost certain that was
presented already. What reasons do the CF programmers give for not
buying the package as a whole? Sure they see downsides like perceived
reduction in productivity, what did management present as advantages
that the CF programmers don't think is worth it?

 
Reply With Quote
 
Monique Y. Mudama
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-17-2006
On 2006-04-16, chris penned:

> Well, anyone have any comments on these statements? I am the lone
> ranger here! I know about objected oriented programming and the
> performance of Java vs. CF, but those have failed to be convincing
> arguments.


If ColdFusion looks anything like it did the last time I used it, 5+
years ago, the "demented HTML" syntax would be enough to drive me over
the edge.

So ugly.

*shudders*

*hides in a soft warm blankie and waits for the evil monster to go
away*

--
monique

Ask smart questions, get good answers:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
porting ColdFusion "structure" style to java Marc E Java 0 04-24-2006 12:44 AM
JAVA/ COLDFUSION/ MX7/ CONTRACT OMNI GROUP Javascript 0 02-12-2006 09:39 PM
JAVA/ COLDFUSION/ CONTRACT/ IN OMNI GROUP Java 0 02-12-2006 09:37 PM
ColdFusion vs. Perl ccc31807 Perl 0 06-03-2004 09:59 PM
Re: Total newbie: ASP.NET or Coldfusion ? Kevin Spencer ASP .Net 0 06-25-2003 06:11 PM



Advertisments