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why program to interface is better design?

 
 
Thomas G. Marshall
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      10-03-2005
Monique Y. Mudama coughed up:
> On 2005-10-03, Thomas G. Marshall penned:
>>
>> Succeeds /when/? Word perfect /did/ dominate at one point. So did
>> "visicalc". In fact, so did "quicken". Things are fluid. This
>> sub-argument has to end because it has nothing to do with why
>> time-to-market can be so important in the first place, which was a
>> fundamental component to my argument.

>
> I miss the glory days of WordPerfect. Mmmmm reveal codes.


Oh Christ. That app was a mess. Reminded me of that silly "Gold" key on
VT-52's on WPS-8 word processing software on PDP-8's. Dating myself
terribly. But everything was a bizarre key combinations. Gold-this,
Gold-that. Perhaps only emacs was worse....


--
Enough is enough. It is /not/ a requirement that someone must google
relentlessly for an answer before posting in usenet. Newsgroups are
for discussions. Discussions do /not/ necessitate prior research. If
you are bothered by someone asking a question without taking time to
look something up, simply do not respond.


 
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Monique Y. Mudama
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      10-03-2005
On 2005-10-03, Thomas G. Marshall penned:
> Monique Y. Mudama coughed up:
>> On 2005-10-03, Thomas G. Marshall penned:
>>>
>>> Succeeds /when/? Word perfect /did/ dominate at one point. So
>>> did "visicalc". In fact, so did "quicken". Things are fluid.
>>> This sub-argument has to end because it has nothing to do with why
>>> time-to-market can be so important in the first place, which was a
>>> fundamental component to my argument.

>>
>> I miss the glory days of WordPerfect. Mmmmm reveal codes.

>
> Oh Christ. That app was a mess. Reminded me of that silly "Gold"
> key on VT-52's on WPS-8 word processing software on PDP-8's. Dating
> myself terribly. But everything was a bizarre key combinations.
> Gold-this, Gold-that. Perhaps only emacs was worse....
>


No idea what you're talking about. But WP was extremely powerful.
That's worth a bit of extra memorization.

Granted, I'm a vim person, not an emacs person ... I'd rather use home
row keys than control ...

--
monique

Ask smart questions, get good answers:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
 
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Monique Y. Mudama
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      10-03-2005
["Followup-To:" header set to comp.lang.java.programmer.] On
2005-10-03, Thomas G. Marshall penned:
>
> Interestingly, I am the one who is known for "going to the mat" in
> arguments over seeming minutiae. I internally demand perfection,
> but that's if it is affordable. Other than that, it's all business
> calculus. Stop the ridiculous romance, make your money, be the
> world's best designer but when someone's paying you for it.
>


When I see a design, maintenance, etc. concern, I do my level best to
bring it to the attention of my lead and make sure they understand the
problem. Once they understand it, it is their job to decide whether
it's a problem worth pursuing.

If I were in more of a leadership role, of course, I would be the one
making such decisions.

--
monique

Ask smart questions, get good answers:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
 
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Thomas G. Marshall
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      10-03-2005
Monique Y. Mudama coughed up:
> On 2005-10-03, Thomas G. Marshall penned:
>> Monique Y. Mudama coughed up:


....[rip]...

>>> I miss the glory days of WordPerfect. Mmmmm reveal codes.

>>
>> Oh Christ. That app was a mess. Reminded me of that silly "Gold"
>> key on VT-52's on WPS-8 word processing software on PDP-8's. Dating
>> myself terribly. But everything was a bizarre key combinations.
>> Gold-this, Gold-that. Perhaps only emacs was worse....

>
> No idea what you're talking about. But WP was extremely powerful.
> That's worth a bit of extra memorization.
>
> Granted, I'm a vim person, not an emacs person ... I'd rather use home
> row keys than control ...


Gotcha. When I ran a unix development department, vi was all I *could* use,
since I couldn't easily get anything else to run on the myriad of
pre-released hardware I had to port to. Used (use) VI for years. Use it
now, for when I cygwin-BASH {shudder} into a directory for bare-knuckles
editing/javac/java cycling.


--
Puzzle: You are given a deck of cards all face down
except for 10 cards mixed in which are face up.
If you are in a pitch black room, how do you divide
the deck into two piles (may be uneven) that each
contain the same number of face-up cards?
Answer (rot13): Sebz naljurer va gur qrpx, qrny bhg
gra pneqf naq syvc gurz bire.


 
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Tor Iver Wilhelmsen
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      10-03-2005
"Monique Y. Mudama" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> I miss the glory days of WordPerfect. Mmmmm reveal codes.


*Reveal* them? They should be in the document all the time. Wordstar
and TROFF for the win.
 
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Zorro
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      10-03-2005
> When I see a design, maintenance, etc. concern, I do my level best to
> bring it to the attention of my lead and make sure they understand the
> problem. Once they understand it, it is their job to decide whether
> it's a problem worth pursuing.


> If I were in more of a leadership role, of course, I would be the one
> making such decisions.


What you are saying in correct. In fact, just about any meaningful
statement is correct in some context. Of course your statement is not
just a meaningful one, it is a proper procedure and under normal
circumstances, that is how one should proceed.

I do not know if this will benefit anyone, but with the hope that it
may result in positive and constructive reactions, I will give a little
more detail of the incident. The point is that, an engineer who knows
what he is doing, should not just do what he is told to.

I was maintaining a C++ library of over 120,000 lines, with a huge
number of classes. The CEO really wanted to replace our competitor's
library with ours for a customer. This is a reasonable suggestion. The
people who talked to him were my boss and the contractor. They told
him, no problem, in fact it is easy.

So, they come to me and tell me how to do it. The contractor wants me
to create a header file containing C macro defines. These defines will
replace every class, method etc of the competitor's library with ours,
in the customer's code.

They seemed to understand my academic explanation about the absurdity
of their suggestion. But my boss insisted that I do it anyway. Then, I
asked them, why do you think the customer would accept this for
probably millions of lines of their code, even if it works. The answer
was, that comes later.

Now, according to your statement, I should have done it anyway. I
explained it, they understood, and the conditions of your statement are
met. There was one problem. My boss could not go back to the CEO and
tell him that he had no clue what he was talking about, and the
contractor was already working on going to customer site to help them
with conversion.

I do not know how this will help. I certainly would not go to the CEO
and speak against my boss. Perhaps it will help the bosses reading this
to learn to talk to their engineer before making promises to their
superiors.

Regards,
Z.

 
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Monique Y. Mudama
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      10-03-2005
On 2005-10-03, Zorro penned:
>
> Now, according to your statement, I should have done it anyway. I
> explained it, they understood, and the conditions of your statement
> are met. There was one problem. My boss could not go back to the CEO
> and tell him that he had no clue what he was talking about, and the
> contractor was already working on going to customer site to help
> them with conversion.
>
> I do not know how this will help. I certainly would not go to the
> CEO and speak against my boss. Perhaps it will help the bosses
> reading this to learn to talk to their engineer before making
> promises to their superiors.
>


It sounds like the real problem you had was a boss with no integrity.
Of course he could go back to the CEO and admit he was wrong. And in
a good company, being wrong occasionally doesn't get you fired.

I can't see quitting over a technical disagreement, but I can
definitely see quitting because your boss has no spine.

--
monique

Ask smart questions, get good answers:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
 
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Roedy Green
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      10-04-2005
On Mon, 03 Oct 2005 16:27:41 GMT, "Thomas G. Marshall"
<(E-Mail Removed). com> wrote or quoted
:

>Interestingly, I am the one who is known for "going to the mat" in arguments
>over seeming minutiae.


I still sometimes wake up in as sweat thinking about a job I had circa
1993 in toxic company. Life is so short. You would not believe how
fast you get old.

I would suggest to anyone in such a situation, GET OUT. You are
needlessly torturing yourself.

There was a period in my life I had so little money I went without
food and heat I lived on pancakes.. In retrospect, that was much
easier to bear.

--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
http://mindprod.com Again taking new Java programming contracts.
 
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David Kerber
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      10-04-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...

....

> It's almost a truism that the first product, not the best product, is
> the one that succeeds in the market.


And a false one at that. I can't recall a single case where that has
happened, though there must be some. IME, it's usually the 2nd or 3rd
one to market who makes it big, because they learn from the mistakes of
#1, and #1 has let the potential audience know that there's something
out there which might be worth buying. Look at IBM with the PC, Henry
Ford with automobiles, Apple, etc.

--
Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
newsgroups if possible).
 
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Monique Y. Mudama
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      10-04-2005
On 2005-10-04, David Kerber penned:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> (E-Mail Removed) says...
>
> ...
>
>> It's almost a truism that the first product, not the best product,
>> is the one that succeeds in the market.

>
> And a false one at that. I can't recall a single case where that
> has happened, though there must be some. IME, it's usually the 2nd
> or 3rd one to market who makes it big, because they learn from the
> mistakes of #1, and #1 has let the potential audience know that
> there's something out there which might be worth buying. Look at
> IBM with the PC, Henry Ford with automobiles, Apple, etc.


Well, there's a very recent example for my company where a customer
chose another vendor for a product. Our people pointed out that the
competitor's product didn't work as advertised and didn't do what it
promised to do. Their response? "Yes, but theirs is available now."
Ours was still in development.

Certainly lack of a product results in lost business opportunities.

--
monique

Ask smart questions, get good answers:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
 
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