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Some REALLY basic questions about versions

 
 
Michael Hesse
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      07-24-2005
Hi,

New to Java. What is the difference between an SDK and a JDK? I see that
there is SDK 1.4 and JDK 5.0. Should I use one over the other?

What is the difference between Java Studio Creator and Net Beans? Any
recommendations?

Thanks,

Michael


 
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Alan Krueger
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      07-24-2005
Michael Hesse wrote:
> New to Java. What is the difference between an SDK and a JDK? I see that
> there is SDK 1.4 and JDK 5.0. Should I use one over the other?


The JDK (Java Development Kit) contains development tools, including the
bytecode compiler. The JRE (Java Runtime Environment) contains just the
runtime. JDK became the Java 2 SDK in v1.2, but has (apparently) again
become JDK.
 
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Monique Y. Mudama
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      07-24-2005
On 2005-07-24, Michael Hesse penned:
> Hi,
>
> New to Java. What is the difference between an SDK and a JDK? I
> see that there is SDK 1.4 and JDK 5.0. Should I use one over the
> other?


SDK vs. JDK is just a naming convention; no difference. 5.0 is I
believe really 1.5. 1.5 adds some interesting new language features, but
it really depends on what you can expect your users to have installed.
You won't be at any real disadvantage if you use 1.4 right now, and
your users will be more likely to have 1.4 than 1.5.

> What is the difference between Java Studio Creator and Net Beans?
> Any recommendations?


No idea.

--
monique

Ask smart questions, get good answers:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
 
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Thomas Weidenfeller
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      07-25-2005
Michael Hesse wrote:
> New to Java.


Beginner's questions are best handled in comp.lang.java.help

> What is the difference between an SDK and a JDK? I see that
> there is SDK 1.4 and JDK 5.0.


Sun employs a bunch of bored people who have nothing better to do than
to rename and renumber products. These people have a fixation on
renaming and renumbering Java - after doing the same with other Sun
products like the Solaris OS and the C/C++ compiler for years.

E.g. once the Java SDK (Software Development Kit) was called JDK (Java
Development Kit). Than some of this bored guys at Sun renamed the JDK to
something like "Java 2 SDK". Later, still bored, they once again renamed
it back to JDK (with Java 1.5/5.0).

The same happens with the numbering. Suddenly Java 1.2 was called "Java
2". But of course Java 1.3 was called "Java 2 SE 1.3" (or something
along the line). With Java 1.5 they did it again. Java 1.5 is suddenly
called Java 5.0.

Enough? Well, still not for the bored guys at Sun. How would one now
expect the next major version of Java to be called? "Java 6.0", right?
Wrong! That one will be "Java 6". Sun will drop the minor number. Of
course, this will open up a new can of worms, because how are they now
going to identify maintenance releases? I would expect atrocities like
"Java 6 SE Build 1.6.3_b24" in the future.


> Should I use one over the other?


I would suggest you start with Java 1.5, alias Java 5.0. Unless you have
a good reason to start with the older 1.4 JDK/SDK. Such a good reason
might e.g. be that your textbook (you do have a textbook, don't you?)
doesn't cover the new Java 1.5 features (e.g. generics).

If you follow a 1.4 textbook but you use Java 1.5. you will get a bunch
of warnings from the compiler because one is supposed to do some things
differently in 1.5.

> What is the difference between Java Studio Creator and Net Beans?


NetBeans is Sun's free IDE, which is a classic IDE (supports the usual
things on expects from an IDE).

Java Studio Creator is a commercial Sun product, which is centered
around visual "programming". One is supposed to drag and drop stuff to
somehow assemble an applications. Some years ago one would have called
that a RAID tool.

JSC is unsuitable if you want to learn the programming language.

> Any
> recommendations?


Use non of these. Consider using the command line tools that come with
the JDK/SDK, so you get an idea of how things really work.

If you are more interested in object-oriented programming than Java,
consider the BlueJ IDE http://www.bluej.org That IDE is particularly
made for students.

/Thomas

--
The comp.lang.java.gui FAQ:
ftp://ftp.cs.uu.nl/pub/NEWS.ANSWERS/...g/java/gui/faq
http://www.uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv....java.gui.faq/
 
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Michael Hesse
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-25-2005
Thanks for the very thorough answer. I am pretty sure I am less confused.


And yes, I am working with a 1.4 book and using the command lines tools for
now.

Michael



"Thomas Weidenfeller" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dc28dl$pe6$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Michael Hesse wrote:
>> New to Java.

>
> Beginner's questions are best handled in comp.lang.java.help
>
>> What is the difference between an SDK and a JDK? I see that there is SDK
>> 1.4 and JDK 5.0.

>
> Sun employs a bunch of bored people who have nothing better to do than to
> rename and renumber products. These people have a fixation on renaming and
> renumbering Java - after doing the same with other Sun products like the
> Solaris OS and the C/C++ compiler for years.
>
> E.g. once the Java SDK (Software Development Kit) was called JDK (Java
> Development Kit). Than some of this bored guys at Sun renamed the JDK to
> something like "Java 2 SDK". Later, still bored, they once again renamed
> it back to JDK (with Java 1.5/5.0).
>
> The same happens with the numbering. Suddenly Java 1.2 was called "Java
> 2". But of course Java 1.3 was called "Java 2 SE 1.3" (or something along
> the line). With Java 1.5 they did it again. Java 1.5 is suddenly called
> Java 5.0.
>
> Enough? Well, still not for the bored guys at Sun. How would one now
> expect the next major version of Java to be called? "Java 6.0", right?
> Wrong! That one will be "Java 6". Sun will drop the minor number. Of
> course, this will open up a new can of worms, because how are they now
> going to identify maintenance releases? I would expect atrocities like
> "Java 6 SE Build 1.6.3_b24" in the future.
>
>
>> Should I use one over the other?

>
> I would suggest you start with Java 1.5, alias Java 5.0. Unless you have a
> good reason to start with the older 1.4 JDK/SDK. Such a good reason might
> e.g. be that your textbook (you do have a textbook, don't you?) doesn't
> cover the new Java 1.5 features (e.g. generics).
>
> If you follow a 1.4 textbook but you use Java 1.5. you will get a bunch of
> warnings from the compiler because one is supposed to do some things
> differently in 1.5.
>
>> What is the difference between Java Studio Creator and Net Beans?

>
> NetBeans is Sun's free IDE, which is a classic IDE (supports the usual
> things on expects from an IDE).
>
> Java Studio Creator is a commercial Sun product, which is centered around
> visual "programming". One is supposed to drag and drop stuff to somehow
> assemble an applications. Some years ago one would have called that a RAID
> tool.
>
> JSC is unsuitable if you want to learn the programming language.
>
>> Any recommendations?

>
> Use non of these. Consider using the command line tools that come with the
> JDK/SDK, so you get an idea of how things really work.
>
> If you are more interested in object-oriented programming than Java,
> consider the BlueJ IDE http://www.bluej.org That IDE is particularly made
> for students.
>
> /Thomas
>
> --
> The comp.lang.java.gui FAQ:
> ftp://ftp.cs.uu.nl/pub/NEWS.ANSWERS/...g/java/gui/faq
> http://www.uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv....java.gui.faq/



 
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Chris Smith
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      07-26-2005
Thomas Weidenfeller <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> If you follow a 1.4 textbook but you use Java 1.5. you will get a bunch
> of warnings from the compiler because one is supposed to do some things
> differently in 1.5.


It's worth noting that if you do anything non-trivial, you are in fact
bound to get warnings anyway from 1.5 code. Java 1.5 has unfortunately
made it practically impossible to write most realistic applications
without getting compiler warnings. For those of us who are used to
treating warnings with great respect, this is nothing but infuriating.
I've had to disable the type safety warnings from Eclipse to avoid this
horrid situation.

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way To Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
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Thomas Weidenfeller
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2005
Chris Smith wrote:
> It's worth noting that if you do anything non-trivial, you are in fact
> bound to get warnings anyway from 1.5 code. Java 1.5 has unfortunately
> made it practically impossible to write most realistic applications
> without getting compiler warnings.


Tells a lot about the real-world experience of the JCP committee which
did the 1.5 spec., doesn't it?

/Thomas

--
The comp.lang.java.gui FAQ:
ftp://ftp.cs.uu.nl/pub/NEWS.ANSWERS/...g/java/gui/faq
http://www.uni-giessen.de/faq/archiv....java.gui.faq/
 
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