Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Programming > Java > Future reuse of code

Reply
Thread Tools

Future reuse of code

 
 
James Cameron
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003
Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
major factor in selecting the development language. Any comments on
past experience, research articles, comments on the matter would be
much appreciated. I suspect something like C would be the best based
on comments I received from the VB news group.

Thanks for the help in advance

James Cameron
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Harald Hein
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003
"James Cameron" wrote:

> I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
> reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road.


Tell your customer a lie. No one can predict 5 years, let alone 15 into
the future in this business. If your client asks, he doesn't have much
clue and will be happy with any answer.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
A Bag Of Memes
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003

"James Cameron" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
> reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
> major factor in selecting the development language. Any comments on
> past experience, research articles, comments on the matter would be
> much appreciated. I suspect something like C would be the best based
> on comments I received from the VB news group.
>
> Thanks for the help in advance


Why would language choice affect code reuse? You can reuse code written in
any language as long as you care to.



 
Reply With Quote
 
Malcolm
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003

"James Cameron" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

> Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
> reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
> major factor in selecting the development language.
>

Your best bet is conservative C89.

Why not C++? Because the standard template library is only a few years old.
Things might have changed out of recognition in 15 years time. You will
stillbe able to compile the code, probably, but it will be difficult to
maintain.

C99 may never be implemented.

Java COBOL and Visual Basic I know little about. VB is unstable, COBOL is
virtually obsolete. Java might be an OK choice but is rather tied to the
net. A C file, OTOH, will almost certainly be linkable in ten years time.



 
Reply With Quote
 
John D.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (James Cameron) wrote in message news:<(E-Mail Removed). com>...
> Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
> reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
> major factor in selecting the development language. Any comments on
> past experience, research articles, comments on the matter would be
> much appreciated. I suspect something like C would be the best based
> on comments I received from the VB news group.


The best language to ensure future reuse of the code is english.
Whatever programming language you chose always remember to document
your code.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Donald Tees
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003
"Peter E.C. Dashwood" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "James Cameron" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> > Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
> > reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
> > major factor in selecting the development language. Any comments on
> > past experience, research articles, comments on the matter would be
> > much appreciated. I suspect something like C would be the best based
> > on comments I received from the VB news group.
> >

>
> The source language is irrelevant in terms of code re-use. (It is OBJECT
> code that will be re-used...)
>
> You should select a source language SUITABLE FOR THE JOB YOU WANT TO DO!!!
>
> Then make sure that an OO or modular approach is adopted, wrap your
> functions as components, and you can reuse them FOR EVER not just 15

years.
>
> Pete.
>


Aren't you talking about marriage or something? About the *only* code I
know that is still running after 15 years use is in Cobol. I could say the
same for 30 years.

Even in the last five years, the components I have used have evolved into
different packaging, required updates for each OS, etc. etc.

Donald


 
Reply With Quote
 
Paul Barnett
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003

"Malcolm" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bgktdu$n07$(E-Mail Removed)...

> ... COBOL is
> virtually obsolete...
>

Hey! Cut that out!

Check out this site: www.microfocus.com


 
Reply With Quote
 
LX-i
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003
James Cameron wrote:
^^^^^^^^^^^^^
You're a great filmmaker - why are you switching to programming?

> Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
> reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
> major factor in selecting the development language. Any comments on
> past experience, research articles, comments on the matter would be
> much appreciated. I suspect something like C would be the best based
> on comments I received from the VB news group.
>
> Thanks for the help in advance
>
> James Cameron


(I'm a regular poster in comp.lang.cobol)

You really need to have them define what they mean by "code reuse". In
general, if the design of the system is done using components, this
really doesn't have to be an issue. A component could be written in any
number of languages, as long as it adheres to a standard interface (such
as COM).

And, 5 to 15 years down the road, what are they going to be "reusing"?
Seems to me, if they're interested in reuse, they'd use whatever
language you use on this project. At that point, the only decision you
need to make is, what language best supports the business logic you're
trying to automate?

Once you make this decision, structure the system in such a way that it
resembles a collection of building blocks (whether it's broken out by
component, by a collection of common subroutines, copybooks/macros,
whatever). Then, using your rationale for your language choice, and the
modularity design you've chosen, formulate a point paper for your client
detailing why the language you've chosen is the best for their needs,
and how you're posturing them for future code reuse.

Personally, I work on a large aircraft maintenance program for a major
military branch . The system is written in COBOL, and we mostly use
copybooks (similar to macros in C) for our reuse. Each copybook has
comments that define the input parameters expected, and the output one
can expect from it. That way, if the process changes, we change the
copybook. The disadvantage to this technique is that it requires each
program that copies it to be recompiled (rebuilt).

I'm working on a few initiatives to convert this to common subroutines,
that can be modified and "switched out" without having to modify the
underlying programs. This is showing a lot of promise, and I know that
there are other regular posters here who have not only done this
successfully, but have also utilized C, VB, C++, even .NET classes and
components from within COBOL.

Of course, the bottom line - decide what language would be best, then
convince your client of your genius.


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~
~ / \ / ~ Live from Montgomery, AL! ~
~ / \/ o ~ ~
~ / /\ - | ~ AIM: LXi0007 ~
~ _____ / \ | ~ E-mail: (E-Mail Removed) ~
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ I do not read e-mail at the above address ~
~ Please post if you wish to be contacted privately ~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~

 
Reply With Quote
 
LX-i
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003
Malcolm wrote:

> Java COBOL and Visual Basic I know little about. VB is unstable, COBOL is
> virtually obsolete.


What? COBOL is obsolete? I guess OO and .NET are obsolete too...


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~
~ / \ / ~ Live from Montgomery, AL! ~
~ / \/ o ~ ~
~ / /\ - | ~ AIM: LXi0007 ~
~ _____ / \ | ~ E-mail: (E-Mail Removed) ~
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ I do not read e-mail at the above address ~
~ Please post if you wish to be contacted privately ~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~

 
Reply With Quote
 
Harley
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-04-2003

"Malcolm" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bgktdu$n07$(E-Mail Removed)...
|
| "James Cameron" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
|
| > Hi I'm developing a program and the client is worried about future
| > reuse of the code. Say 5, 10, 15 years down the road. This will be a
| > major factor in selecting the development language.
| >
| Java COBOL and Visual Basic I know little about. VB is unstable, COBOL is
| virtually obsolete.

COBOL ain't dead yet.
It has a history, and some code that surpasses the 15 year reusability
requirement.




 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To reuse or not to reuse jacob navia C Programming 19 12-18-2006 07:22 AM
code reuse and design reuse sailor.gu@gmail.com C Programming 16 02-12-2006 09:09 PM
Reuse paramter list and reuse connection tshad ASP .Net 5 05-17-2005 12:33 AM
To reuse or not to reuse.... Hylander Java 0 02-26-2004 12:00 AM
Future reuse of code James Cameron C++ 244 08-26-2003 07:39 PM



Advertisments