Velocity Reviews

Velocity Reviews (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/index.php)
-   Digital Photography (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/f37-digital-photography.html)
-   -   Best lens for wildlife photography? (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t960500-best-lens-for-wildlife-photography.html)

05-09-2013 01:22 AM

Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
DSLR - possibly Nikon D600 - planning a trip to Falkland Island to see
wildlife and also the scenery.

Maybe 70-200 with a magnifying ring on hand as well, or something else?

As usual, polite thanks in advance for the replies.

Martin Brown 05-09-2013 07:05 AM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On 09/05/2013 04:47, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-05-08 19:48:28 -0700, "Frank S" <fsheffi1@san.rr.com> said:
>
>>
>> "Savageduck" <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote in message
>> news:2013050819012829267-savageduck1@REMOVESPAMmecom...
>>> On 2013-05-08 18:22:30 -0700, <flatulantdingo@deadspam.com> said:
>>>
>>>> DSLR - possibly Nikon D600 - planning a trip to Falkland Island to see
>>>> wildlife and also the scenery.
>>>>
>>>> Maybe 70-200 with a magnifying ring on hand as well, or something else?
>>>>
>>>> As usual, polite thanks in advance for the replies.
>>>
>>> If you can afford the D600 fine. However you will get more reach with
>>> an APS-C DSLR.
>>> The Nikkor 70-200mm AFII is a great lens with a great $$$$ price,
>>> again if you can afford it, fine. However the 70-200mm is not a do it
>>> all lens.
>>>
>>> Consider that you will probably need a walk-around lens with a wider
>>> range for those scenic shots, for FF consider the Nikkor AF-S 16-35mm
>>> f/4G VR, or the new 24-120mm f/4G VR. There is also the surprisingly
>>> good value and performer, the Nikkor AF-S VR f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED.
>>>
>>> Just remember with the D600 + 70-200mm you are looking at around
>>> $4500. For that you can get a D7100 + an 18-105mm kit lens + Nikkor
>>> AF-S VR f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED + an AF-S DX 10-24mm all for around $3100
>>> and an extra $1400 to spend on the trip, perhaps a spare battery and
>>> extra SDHC cards and a decent bag.
>>>
>>>

>>
>> A 70-200 with a 2x extender will be nice for snapshots;

>
> Actually the 1.7X will give you better results.
>
>> if you want seriously good product, 400mm will be the minimum for
>> real wild wild-life. If you have time before your safari, think about
>> renting the body and lenses you'll consider. It'll be better to look
>> at some trial images and be disappointed or elated than to have a
>> pocketful of best-I-could-do to lament over.

>
> I agree a 400mm or 500mm would be great, and I would only rent those
> lenses, I would also consider renting an extra FF body for some events.
> However, we don't know of the OP's travel arrangements to The Falklands,
> whether it will be via plane or a cruise of some type. We don't know if
> this is going to be a trip specifically for a photo shoot or a vacation
> with photography as incidental to the trip. So consider the extra weight
> and bulk of a 400mm or 500mm lens to add to general and landscape
> shooting requirements.


At the risk of being contentious and accepting here that you will have
to live with softer focus and donut shaped out of focus highlights a
mirror lens is not a bad compromise for wild life photography where size
and weight are important factors. I do have traditional long lenses too
but sometimes their large physical size gets in the way.
>
> From the point of view of a vacationer who has not done this type of
> photography before and from what he has said, has not even bought the
> DSRR yet (I assume he has yet to buy the D600 + 70-200mm and he is
> asking advice), I would thing he might be better off buying less
> expensive kit at this point on his DSLR wildlife photography learning
> curve. Then he could consider the transition to FF from APS-C.


Possibly the most important advice is take a camera and lenses with you
that you already know inside out and a spare body. Reading the manual in
driving rain whilst some rare bird makes its getaway is not good. Same
with weddings...

>> At the end, if you think your efforts will result in saleable stuff,
>> spare no expense; if it's for your own enjoyment, relax and enjoy the
>> experience, and take a little extra time and equipment to memorialize
>> your enjoyment.

>
> I believe he could do quite well with a lesser DSLR Say a D300S or a
> D7100 on his trip rather than the D600.
> Here is a D300S shot using an 80-400mm VR @ 200mm.
> <
> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...0_HDR-Ac2w.jpg


The kit used is generally secondary to knowing where to go and framing
the scene - assuming a certain minimum standard of gear. A really good
tripod is essential when using long lenses and a means to fire the
shutter without physically touching the camera (something I think modern
cameras lacking traditional cable releases are not so good at).

My old Pentax istD would sometimes forget to autofocus when triggered by
its remote control - a rather irritating fault.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown

Ghost-Rider 05-09-2013 09:16 AM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
Le 09/05/2013 03:22, flatulantdingo@deadspam.com a écrit :
> DSLR - possibly Nikon D600 - planning a trip to Falkland Island to see
> wildlife and also the scenery.
>
> Maybe 70-200 with a magnifying ring on hand as well, or something else?
>
> As usual, polite thanks in advance for the replies.
>


Hello, I'm new here.
If weight, bulk and the bore and risks of having to change lens is
important, you might consider an APSC with a super-zoom.
I used to do everything with a D90 with the 18-200. I have shifted to
the D7000 with the 18-300 and it is perfect for travelling, scenery or
wild life, including close-ups with one or two MCON35 Olympus close-ups
lenses screwed on it.
The quality is there and allows reframing, I never change lens, have no
problem with dust, I always have the right lens on the body and a
limited weight hanging on my shoulder.
Examples available if you like.

05-09-2013 09:38 AM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On Wed, 8 May 2013 20:47:22 -0700 Savageduck wrote:-

>Here is a D300S shot using an 80-400mm VR @ 200mm.
><
>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...0_HDR-Ac2w.jpg


Very nice!


05-09-2013 09:39 AM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On Wed, 8 May 2013 20:50:29 -0700 Savageduck wrote:-

>> Here is a D300S shot using an 80-400mm VR @ 200mm.
>> <
>> https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...0_HDR-Ac2w.jpg

>
>That
>>

>was not the shot I intended to link to, here you go:
><
>https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/.../DNC_7613w.jpg
>>


LOL!

Still nice but I liked the first one better!

PeterN 05-09-2013 04:51 PM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On 5/8/2013 9:22 PM, flatulantdingo@deadspam.com wrote:
> DSLR - possibly Nikon D600 - planning a trip to Falkland Island to see
> wildlife and also the scenery.
>
> Maybe 70-200 with a magnifying ring on hand as well, or something else?
>
> As usual, polite thanks in advance for the replies.
>


If your budget permits, I would consider a D800, which, will give you a
much better cropped image, than any smaller sensor camera, plus you will
have the advantage of being able to use a wide angle lens.
The test shot below was shot with my D800, using the 70-200 lens with a
1.7 extender. I was about 150 yards away. The image on the left is full
frame, the one of the right is a crop of that FF image.
<https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/_DSC6570.jpg>

If you want on all purpose lens, then think about the 28-300. While it
is not as sharp as the 70-200, it weighs a lot less and gives a wider
angle of view.
Here is an image I shot from about 50 yds with the 28-300mm, also cropped.
<https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/shtopem%20from%20floppin.jpg>


--
PeterN

me 05-09-2013 06:15 PM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On Thu, 9 May 2013 11:22:30 +1000, <flatulantdingo@deadspam.com>
wrote:

>DSLR - possibly Nikon D600 - planning a trip to Falkland Island to see
>wildlife and also the scenery.
>
>Maybe 70-200 with a magnifying ring on hand as well, or something else?
>
>As usual, polite thanks in advance for the replies.



It would help to have the problem bounded a bit more. Size?, weight?
$$? Other lenses you intend to have as well. How do you intend to
handle the wide end, or you don't care below 70mm?
I have the 18-200mm VRII, 1st gen 70-200mm f/2.8 VR (with 1.x and 2x)
and 1st gen 200-400mm f/4 VR (with 1.4x and 2x).
on a D70, D200 and D300 all handheld and I carry all around quite a
bit.

Wally 05-09-2013 08:19 PM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On Thu, 9 May 2013 11:22:30 +1000, <flatulantdingo@deadspam.com>
wrote:

>DSLR - possibly Nikon D600 - planning a trip to Falkland Island to see
>wildlife and also the scenery.
>
>Maybe 70-200 with a magnifying ring on hand as well, or something else?
>
>As usual, polite thanks in advance for the replies.


Serious wildlife photography is a demanding art. If high quality
nature photography is your goal, the most important thing is to get
some solid experience first before setting out on this trip.

I use a Canon 7D and 100-400mm lens. The lens is very compact and
easily goes into a briefcase together with the camera body, laptop,
extra couple of lenses and backup body. This is a big advantage for
travel. The 400mm gives the equivalent of a 600mm lens on a full frame
35mm camera. The lens is versatile and very sharp at the long end (but
samples vary, so test it if you buy it).

In the Nikon line, use a DX body and the 200-400mm lens. The 200-400mm
is much bigger (and much more expensive) than the Canon 100-400, and
with its bulk and weight you will need to consider how to safely get
the lens to its destination. I would NOT put it into checked luggage.

You won't need a tripod for either of these rigs, and I would avoid a
tripod anyway so you have mobility (unless you are shooting static
subjects like a bird on a nest).

For top results, you will need a full frame camera, but then you will
also need a proportionally longer lens -- and a tripod, because you
won't be able to hand-hold this. Getting such fancy gear to the
Falkands and back will be a challenge.

Most likely you were not thinking of such pro gear, and might be well
satisfied with something simpler, such as a 70-200mm lens optionally
with an extender, or maybe the new Canon 70-300mm (the one with the
white body), or the old version Canon 70-300mm, which is cheap and
pretty sharp, and even better when stopped down.

Or you could go down another level and use a point-and-shoot with a
20x zoom lens.

Wally

05-09-2013 08:36 PM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On Thu, 09 May 2013 12:51:12 -0400 PeterN wrote:-

>Here is an image I shot from about 50 yds with the 28-300mm, also
>cropped.
><https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/shtopem%20from%20floppin.jpg>


LOL! Some real wildlife!

PeterN 05-11-2013 01:28 AM

Re: Best lens for wildlife photography?
 
On 5/9/2013 4:36 PM, flatulantdingo@deadspam.com wrote:
> On Thu, 09 May 2013 12:51:12 -0400 PeterN wrote:-
>
>> Here is an image I shot from about 50 yds with the 28-300mm, also
>> cropped.
>> <https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/97242118/shtopem%20from%20floppin.jpg>

>
> LOL! Some real wildlife!
>


Actual she and her boyfriend were very nice people. We quite a nice
conversation.

--
PeterN


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:14 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®. Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.