Velocity Reviews

Velocity Reviews (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/index.php)
-   C Programming (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/f42-c-programming.html)
-   -   Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t956403-favourite-pattern-for-processing-zero-once-multiple.html)

Shao Miller 01-10-2013 10:53 PM

Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
Suppose you have a function 'bar' that returns a value that means one of:
- Do 'foo' zero times
- Do 'foo' one time
- Do 'foo' more than one time

What's your favourite way of handling such a value? For example:

while ((more = bar()) != cv_zero_times) {
/* Do it at least once */
foo();

/* Do it more than once? */
if (more != cv_more_times)
break;
}

- Shao Miller
--
"Thank you for the kind words; those are the kind of words I like to hear.

Cheerily," -- Richard Harter

BartC 01-10-2013 11:26 PM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 


"Shao Miller" <sha0.miller@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:kcngpa$2jl$1@dont-email.me...
> Suppose you have a function 'bar' that returns a value that means one of:
> - Do 'foo' zero times
> - Do 'foo' one time
> - Do 'foo' more than one time
>
> What's your favourite way of handling such a value?


Obvious return values would be (0, 1, 2), or (0, N) (or just N) if the
actual number of times is being specified.

--
bartc


Shao Miller 01-10-2013 11:49 PM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
On 1/10/2013 18:26, BartC wrote:
>
>
> "Shao Miller" <sha0.miller@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:kcngpa$2jl$1@dont-email.me...
>> Suppose you have a function 'bar' that returns a value that means one of:
>> - Do 'foo' zero times
>> - Do 'foo' one time
>> - Do 'foo' more than one time
>>
>> What's your favourite way of handling such a value? For example:
>>
>> while ((more = bar()) != cv_zero_times) {
>> /* Do it at least once */
>> foo();
>>
>> /* Do it more than once? */
>> if (more != cv_more_times)
>> break;
>> }

>
> Obvious return values would be (0, 1, 2), or (0, N) (or just N) if the
> actual number of times is being specified.
>


Agreed.

And what might be the pattern, in C, that you might use in order to
handle the value and to call 'foo' the right number of times? As
another example:

while (1) {
switch (bar()) {
case cv_zero_times:
/* Exit switch */
break;

case cv_more_times:
foo();
/* Continue loop */
continue;

default:
/* One time */
foo();
}
/* Exit loop */
break;
}

- Shao Miller
--
"Thank you for the kind words; those are the kind of words I like to hear.

Cheerily," -- Richard Harter

BartC 01-11-2013 12:23 AM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
"Shao Miller" <sha0.miller@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:kcnk1e$kmq$1@dont-email.me...
> On 1/10/2013 18:26, BartC wrote:


>> Obvious return values would be (0, 1, 2), or (0, N) (or just N) if the
>> actual number of times is being specified.
>>

>
> Agreed.
>
> And what might be the pattern, in C, that you might use in order to handle
> the value and to call 'foo' the right number of times? As another
> example:


> while (1) {
> switch (bar()) {


OK, you want to know what is actually done with such a value.

I like using switch when decoding multiple values of the same expression. So
your second example is better, IMO, when your bar() function returns one of
three possibilities.

--
Bartc


Ben Bacarisse 01-11-2013 03:20 AM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
Shao Miller <sha0.miller@gmail.com> writes:

> Suppose you have a function 'bar' that returns a value that means one of:
> - Do 'foo' zero times
> - Do 'foo' one time
> - Do 'foo' more than one time
>
> What's your favourite way of handling such a value? For example:
>
> while ((more = bar()) != cv_zero_times) {
> /* Do it at least once */
> foo();
>
> /* Do it more than once? */
> if (more != cv_more_times)
> break;
> }


I'd re-think the whole thing. It's confusing to me since a return of
"more than one time" does not seem to me any such thing (unless you've
got your loop wrong). It seems to mean "do it once and call bar again"
which is messy because it implies an awkward linkage between bar and
foo.

Does this crop up for real? I'd try to find a cleaner way to write the
whole bar() + foo() interaction.

--
Ben.

Shao Miller 01-11-2013 05:38 AM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
On 1/10/2013 22:20, Ben Bacarisse wrote:
> Shao Miller <sha0.miller@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> Suppose you have a function 'bar' that returns a value that means one of:
>> - Do 'foo' zero times
>> - Do 'foo' one time
>> - Do 'foo' more than one time
>>
>> What's your favourite way of handling such a value? For example:
>>
>> while ((more = bar()) != cv_zero_times) {
>> /* Do it at least once */
>> foo();
>>
>> /* Do it more than once? */
>> if (more != cv_more_times)
>> break;
>> }

>
> I'd re-think the whole thing. It's confusing to me since a return of
> "more than one time" does not seem to me any such thing (unless you've
> got your loop wrong). It seems to mean "do it once and call bar again"
> which is messy because it implies an awkward linkage between bar and
> foo.
>
> Does this crop up for real? I'd try to find a cleaner way to write the
> whole bar() + foo() interaction.
>


Thanks, BartC, for your response (I sent you an e-mail, but "no such user").

Thanks, Ben, for your response. Yes, the linkage is awkward!

Yes, 'foo' was just an example of a "do-something." The actual problem
that got me thinking about this is a bit boring, but I wondered if
anyone might have a pattern to suggest.

Consider 'bar' as translating a sequence of characters, one at a time.
The caller uses it for translation, but it's the caller's responsibility
to do something useful with the translated characters.

Sometimes 'bar' will emit no translated characters, but simply track
some state. ("Deal with zero translated characters.")

Sometimes 'bar' will emit a single translated character that's a simple
mapping from the input character. ("Deal with one translated character.")

Sometimes 'bar' will have multiple characters to emit, and the caller
needs to call it multiple times to get all of the characters. ("Here's
one translated character, but call me again because I have more.")

Could be useful for escape sequences: "123${special}ABC" where the '$'
through until the 'l' wouldn't emit anything, but then the subsequent
'}' would cause some special sequence to be emitted, where 'bar' would
know what to emit, but would have to be queried repeatedly until it
finished emitting the special sequence.

One way to deal with this would be to pass a call-back and context to
'bar' so that it could do the emitting itself, but that requires the
programmer to create such a call-back function.

Another way is to use EOF-style, and the case of a single character
output means that 'bar' is always called a second time simply to return
end-of-sequence, which thus suffers a bit of a performance drawback for
that case.

So I thought it was a bit of an interesting challenge and I wonder what
strategies folks might've or might come up with, as a general pattern.

Thanks for your time.

--
- Shao Miller
--
"Thank you for the kind words; those are the kind of words I like to hear.

Cheerily," -- Richard Harter

Bart van Ingen Schenau 01-11-2013 12:10 PM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 00:38:33 -0500, Shao Miller wrote:

> One way to deal with this would be to pass a call-back and context to
> 'bar' so that it could do the emitting itself, but that requires the
> programmer to create such a call-back function.


This might be a good option, but it depends on how well it fits in the
overall application design.

>
> Another way is to use EOF-style, and the case of a single character
> output means that 'bar' is always called a second time simply to return
> end-of-sequence, which thus suffers a bit of a performance drawback for
> that case.


This would be my first choice, before discriminating between 1 and
multiple values to return.
I would make that discrimination only if actual profiling measurements
have shown that the additional call really is a performance bottleneck.

>
> So I thought it was a bit of an interesting challenge and I wonder what
> strategies folks might've or might come up with, as a general pattern.
>
> Thanks for your time.
>
> --
> - Shao Miller


Bart v Ingen Schenau

BartC 01-11-2013 12:15 PM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
"Shao Miller" <sha0.miller@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:kco8gq$mao$1@dont-email.me...
> On 1/10/2013 22:20, Ben Bacarisse wrote:


>> Does this crop up for real? I'd try to find a cleaner way to write the
>> whole bar() + foo() interaction.


That's the key I think (see below).

> Thanks, BartC, for your response (I sent you an e-mail, but "no such
> user").


It was a valid email at one time (Try using bcas instead of bc)

> Sometimes 'bar' will have multiple characters to emit, and the caller
> needs to call it multiple times to get all of the characters. ("Here's
> one translated character, but call me again because I have more.")
>
> Could be useful for escape sequences: "123${special}ABC" where the '$'
> through until the 'l' wouldn't emit anything, but then the subsequent '}'
> would cause some special sequence to be emitted, where 'bar' would know
> what to emit, but would have to be queried repeatedly until it finished
> emitting the special sequence.


At first glance this seems perfectly straightforward: bar is just called
repeatedly until the 'EOF' marker you mention is returned. In this case,
bar() returns the next character in the sequence, rather than some code. If
the "123" in your example was consumed with no output, then bar wouldn't
return until there was something to return, in this case the first character
of whatever replaces "${special}".

But it gets more complicated when you have to consider where this input
string comes from. There might be some global state containing the input
stream, the current position in that stream, and the current position in any
translation string. Or that state might be contained inside bar().

Or perhaps the caller might supply bar() with the next input character (and
bar() needs some look-ahead to operate properly). Or a pointer to a struct
containing the state (so that bar() can be called from different places, all
with their own strings to translate).

> So I thought it was a bit of an interesting challenge and I wonder what
> strategies folks might've or might come up with, as a general pattern.


It's not clear what the roles of bar() and foo() are. Maybe one of those
returns the next translated character, but some more information is needed.
The whole thing seems a bit like a tokeniser, or at least has some of the
same problems to be solved.

--
Bartc



Shao Miller 01-11-2013 06:37 PM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
On 1/11/2013 07:10, Bart van Ingen Schenau wrote:
> On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 00:38:33 -0500, Shao Miller wrote:
>
>> One way to deal with this would be to pass a call-back and context to
>> 'bar' so that it could do the emitting itself, but that requires the
>> programmer to create such a call-back function.

>
> This might be a good option, but it depends on how well it fits in the
> overall application design.
>
>>
>> Another way is to use EOF-style, and the case of a single character
>> output means that 'bar' is always called a second time simply to return
>> end-of-sequence, which thus suffers a bit of a performance drawback for
>> that case.

>
> This would be my first choice, before discriminating between 1 and
> multiple values to return.
> I would make that discrimination only if actual profiling measurements
> have shown that the additional call really is a performance bottleneck.
>


Yeah the call-back strategy has added complexity, but my natural
inclination would be towards this same strategy as you've stated you
prefer, with the same rationale. :) Thanks for the feed-back!

>>
>> So I thought it was a bit of an interesting challenge and I wonder what
>> strategies folks might've or might come up with, as a general pattern.


--
- Shao Miller
--
"Thank you for the kind words; those are the kind of words I like to hear.

Cheerily," -- Richard Harter

Shao Miller 01-11-2013 06:56 PM

Re: Favourite Pattern for Processing Zero, Once, Multiple
 
On 1/11/2013 07:15, BartC wrote:
> "Shao Miller" <sha0.miller@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:kco8gq$mao$1@dont-email.me...
>> On 1/10/2013 22:20, Ben Bacarisse wrote:

>
>>> Does this crop up for real? I'd try to find a cleaner way to write the
>>> whole bar() + foo() interaction.

>
> That's the key I think (see below).
>
>> Sometimes 'bar' will have multiple characters to emit, and the caller
>> needs to call it multiple times to get all of the characters. ("Here's
>> one translated character, but call me again because I have more.")
>>
>> Could be useful for escape sequences: "123${special}ABC" where the '$'
>> through until the 'l' wouldn't emit anything, but then the subsequent '}'
>> would cause some special sequence to be emitted, where 'bar' would know
>> what to emit, but would have to be queried repeatedly until it finished
>> emitting the special sequence.

>
> At first glance this seems perfectly straightforward: bar is just called
> repeatedly until the 'EOF' marker you mention is returned. In this case,
> bar() returns the next character in the sequence, rather than some code. If
> the "123" in your example was consumed with no output, then bar wouldn't
> return until there was something to return, in this case the first
> character
> of whatever replaces "${special}".
>
> But it gets more complicated when you have to consider where this input
> string comes from. There might be some global state containing the input
> stream, the current position in that stream, and the current position in
> any
> translation string. Or that state might be contained inside bar().
>
> Or perhaps the caller might supply bar() with the next input character (and
> bar() needs some look-ahead to operate properly). Or a pointer to a struct
> containing the state (so that bar() can be called from different places,
> all
> with their own strings to translate).
>
>> So I thought it was a bit of an interesting challenge and I wonder what
>> strategies folks might've or might come up with, as a general pattern.

>
> It's not clear what the roles of bar() and foo() are. Maybe one of those
> returns the next translated character, but some more information is
> needed. The whole thing seems a bit like a tokeniser, or at least has
> some of the same problems to be solved.
>


Yeah I was trying to abstract away the details and ask about a general
pattern (since that's what I'm interested in), but maybe the code
example was not illustrative enough. :)

For the subsequent translation scenario I tried to describe, the caller
is responsible for getting a single input character 'ic'. However they
do it should be opaque to the translating function, 'bar'. The caller
calls 'bar' to translate 'ic' to '*oc'.

extern return_type bar(state_type state, char ic, char * oc);

'bar' might not emit any output character '*oc' if it's not yet ready.
In that case, the caller shouldn't work with '*oc'; shouldn't send it
wherever output is going.

'bar' might emit '*oc' and have nothing more to emit until processing
the next 'ic' or beyond.

'bar' might emit '*oc' and inform the caller that there are more output
characters pending, so the caller should call 'bar' again until they've
been consumed. In this case, 'ic' is ignored for subsequent calls to
'bar' as 'bar' already knows what sequence it wishes to emit based on
the 'ic' that triggered it.

'foo' was really just a place-holder for "something the caller does with
the results of 'bar'". This might be to put the output characters in a
buffer or to send them to a stream.

I'm interested in general C patterns for this kind of scenario without
getting too distracted by this particular example of "translating
characters". Having said that, maybe working with this example scenario
is a better idea.

--
- Shao Miller
--
"Thank you for the kind words; those are the kind of words I like to hear.

Cheerily," -- Richard Harter


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:22 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®. Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.