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-   -   Re: Sony tells DSLR shooters they're idiots (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t955236-re-sony-tells-dslr-shooters-theyre-idiots.html)

Chris Malcolm 12-07-2012 11:05 AM

Re: Sony tells DSLR shooters they're idiots
 
In rec.photo.digital.slr-systems David Dyer-Bennet <dd-b@dd-b.net> wrote:
> BobF@somewhere.com writes:


>> On Tue, 4 Dec 2012 23:45:42 +0100, Alfred Molon <alfred_molon@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>>In article <ylfkfw3lh35d.fsf@dd-b.net>, David Dyer-Bennet says...
>>>> Yeah, right. Ask anybody these days. Nikon is making the best DSLRs in
>>>> the market.
>>>
>>>If they are the best, why is there is 3/4 stop exposure mistake?

>>
>> Exposure mistakes are in the eye of the beholder... the camera thinks
>> it did fine, but it doesn't have an incident light meter, which is the
>> only way to get perfection.


> Incident metering is by no means perfect. In fact, it's less accurate
> than reflected metering done carefully; it's a quick-and-dirty kludge
> that's useful in some situations, especially with low-contrast lighting,
> plus it's useful in the studio when reading the effects of individual
> lights as you set things up. I do still have my separate light meter
> (including flash meter), but I see no reason to use it these days.


I still use mine sometimes. I use when I'm using a completely manual
lens with no auto features, I use it when setting up flashguns, and I
use it to decide which lens to use in awkward lighting circumstances
when my camera is still bagged, because it saves carrying out
experiments with the wrong lens.

It has two attachments for incident metering. It has a dome for doing
total incident light metering, and a flat disc for for doing incident
metering with respect to a specific direction of light. That
difference is sometimes important. Incident metering isn't necessarily
perfect, because the meter can't know what your purpose is. The
simplest example is a low contrast scene which you might wish to
expose to the right (of the histogram) as high key, or to the left as
a night scene.

Nor can a histogram-derived auto exposure always be perfect for the
same reason. For example, sometimes you want to expose to the left or
the right of the second histogram peak, not the first.

--
Chris Malcolm


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