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-   -   Polarizing filter. (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t954612-polarizing-filter.html)

Peter Jason 11-19-2012 12:28 AM

Polarizing filter.
 
I want to shoot thru the plate-glass window of a
coffee shop.

At certain times of the day the reflections from
the plate glass obscure everything.

I bought a polarizing filter for the camera and
adjusted the rotation to give minimum reflection,
which helps but there is still too much.

Does anyone know if there's some better way to get
rid of reflections, and if two filters might help,
or even a optical grate?

Peter

David Taylor 11-19-2012 07:15 AM

Re: Polarizing filter.
 
On 19/11/2012 00:28, Peter Jason wrote:
> I want to shoot thru the plate-glass window of a
> coffee shop.
>
> At certain times of the day the reflections from
> the plate glass obscure everything.
>
> I bought a polarizing filter for the camera and
> adjusted the rotation to give minimum reflection,
> which helps but there is still too much.
>
> Does anyone know if there's some better way to get
> rid of reflections, and if two filters might help,
> or even a optical grate?
>
> Peter


Peter, you do know that the best results are obtained when photographing
at an oblique angle to the window, I suppose?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewste...e#Applications
--
Cheers,
David
Web: http://www.satsignal.eu

Peter Jason 11-19-2012 09:41 PM

Re: Polarizing filter.
 
On Mon, 19 Nov 2012 07:15:35 +0000, David Taylor
<david-taylor@blueyonder.co.uk.invalid> wrote:

>On 19/11/2012 00:28, Peter Jason wrote:
>> I want to shoot thru the plate-glass window of a
>> coffee shop.
>>
>> At certain times of the day the reflections from
>> the plate glass obscure everything.
>>
>> I bought a polarizing filter for the camera and
>> adjusted the rotation to give minimum reflection,
>> which helps but there is still too much.
>>
>> Does anyone know if there's some better way to get
>> rid of reflections, and if two filters might help,
>> or even a optical grate?
>>
>> Peter

>
>Peter, you do know that the best results are obtained when photographing
>at an oblique angle to the window, I suppose?
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewste...e#Applications


Thanks, I'll read up on it. Sadly my hide is in
a fixed position and I can't vary the angle.

Wolfgang Weisselberg 12-07-2012 11:03 AM

Re: Polarizing filter.
 
Peter Jason <pj@jostle.com> wrote:
> I want to shoot thru the plate-glass window of a
> coffee shop.


> At certain times of the day the reflections from
> the plate glass obscure everything.


> I bought a polarizing filter for the camera and
> adjusted the rotation to give minimum reflection,
> which helps but there is still too much.


> Does anyone know if there's some better way to get
> rid of reflections, and if two filters might help,
> or even a optical grate?


2 filters would mean you put the other one on the flash.

Using a big enough flash with short enough burn time you reduce
the influence of natural light (and hence it's reflections).
Reflections of the flash are controlled by the fact that it
emits polarized light and how that polarisation reacts to
reflection (filtering the unwanted part again in front of
your lens).

You might want to place that light source incide the coffee
shop, then you can probably forego all that filtering (and
the light loss it means) as then there's no need to filter
out the reflections from the flash.

-Wolfgang

Peter Jason 12-19-2012 08:42 PM

Re: Polarizing filter.
 
On Fri, 7 Dec 2012 12:03:17 +0100, Wolfgang
Weisselberg <ozcvgtt02@sneakemail.com> wrote:

>Peter Jason <pj@jostle.com> wrote:
>> I want to shoot thru the plate-glass window of a
>> coffee shop.

>
>> At certain times of the day the reflections from
>> the plate glass obscure everything.

>
>> I bought a polarizing filter for the camera and
>> adjusted the rotation to give minimum reflection,
>> which helps but there is still too much.

>
>> Does anyone know if there's some better way to get
>> rid of reflections, and if two filters might help,
>> or even a optical grate?

>
>2 filters would mean you put the other one on the flash.
>
>Using a big enough flash with short enough burn time you reduce
>the influence of natural light (and hence it's reflections).
>Reflections of the flash are controlled by the fact that it
>emits polarized light and how that polarisation reacts to
>reflection (filtering the unwanted part again in front of
>your lens).
>
>You might want to place that light source incide the coffee
>shop, then you can probably forego all that filtering (and
>the light loss it means) as then there's no need to filter
>out the reflections from the flash.
>
>-Wolfgang


Thanks, but I realize now that the angle of view
(that cannot be changed in this case) is not right
for a polarizing filter.

DanP 12-20-2012 10:19 AM

Re: Polarizing filter.
 
On Monday, November 19, 2012 9:42:33 PM UTC, Peter Jason wrote:
> On Mon, 19 Nov 2012 07:15:35 +0000, David Taylor
>
> <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.uk.invalid> wrote:
> >
> >Peter, you do know that the best results are obtained when photographing
> >at an oblique angle to the window, I suppose?
> >
> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewste...e#Applications

>
> Thanks, I'll read up on it. Sadly my hide is in
> a fixed position and I can't vary the angle.


If you cannot get close to the glass (makes it easy to block the light) make a list with your fat friends and ask the to stand in the way of the annoying light.

If you don't have fat mates ask someone to bring a dark umbrella. Or a surfboard if you live down under.


DanP

Kwincay Ercolinowitz 12-20-2012 10:49 AM

Re: Polarizing filter.
 
On 20-Dec-12 05:19, DanP wrote:
> On Monday, November 19, 2012 9:42:33 PM UTC, Peter Jason wrote:
>> On Mon, 19 Nov 2012 07:15:35 +0000, David Taylor
>>
>> <david-taylor@blueyonder.co.uk.invalid> wrote:
>>>
>>> Peter, you do know that the best results are obtained when photographing
>>> at an oblique angle to the window, I suppose?
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brewste...e#Applications

>>
>> Thanks, I'll read up on it. Sadly my hide is in
>> a fixed position and I can't vary the angle.

>
> If you cannot get close to the glass (makes it easy to block the light)
> make a list with your fat friends and ask the to stand in the way of

the annoying light.
>
> If you don't have fat mates ask someone to bring a dark umbrella. Or a surfboard if you live down under.


What we do is have negroes stand by the subject to absorb all the
visible light. We specifically tell the negroes not to smile to ensure
that no light reflects off of any of their surfaces.

About 10 negroes in a picture will also act as a neutral density filter
and the negroes are cheaper than the filter itself, especially for our
parsimonious jewish friends.


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