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KDOSS_PERL 12-23-2006 09:19 PM

BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
Greetings to PERL Programmers:

I've been an Unix System Administrator writing crude shell scripts for
the past 15 years. I never got into writing sophisticated scripting
with multiple looks for my jobs. I would like to use Perl scripts and
was wondering if there are any recommendations for a guy with my kind
of back ground. Any input from your guys would be most appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Regards,
-Kennedy


John Bokma 12-23-2006 09:57 PM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
"KDOSS_PERL" <kdoss@comcast.net> wrote:

> Greetings to PERL Programmers:
>
> I've been an Unix System Administrator writing crude shell scripts for
> the past 15 years.


Must have been a case insensitive Unix system then...

--
John Experienced Perl programmer: http://castleamber.com/

Perl help, tutorials, and examples: http://johnbokma.com/perl/

Ric 12-23-2006 10:55 PM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
KDOSS_PERL schrieb:
> Greetings to PERL Programmers:
>
> I've been an Unix System Administrator writing crude shell scripts for
> the past 15 years. I never got into writing sophisticated scripting
> with multiple looks for my jobs. I would like to use Perl scripts and
> was wondering if there are any recommendations for a guy with my kind
> of back ground. Any input from your guys would be most appreciated.


You probably want to use some beginners book, Perl in 21 days or
Learning Perl O'Reilly

Perl is fairly easy and usually you don't program sophisticated large
scale applications with perl, so it should be fairly easy for you to get
into it.


>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Regards,
> -Kennedy
>


grocery_stocker 12-23-2006 11:14 PM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 

Ric wrote:
> KDOSS_PERL schrieb:
> > Greetings to PERL Programmers:
> >
> > I've been an Unix System Administrator writing crude shell scripts for
> > the past 15 years. I never got into writing sophisticated scripting
> > with multiple looks for my jobs. I would like to use Perl scripts and
> > was wondering if there are any recommendations for a guy with my kind
> > of back ground. Any input from your guys would be most appreciated.

>
> You probably want to use some beginners book, Perl in 21 days or
> Learning Perl O'Reilly
>
> Perl is fairly easy and usually you don't program sophisticated large
> scale applications with perl, so it should be fairly easy for you to get
> into it.
>
>


Yes, basic Perl s fairly easy. However, the funky Perl is about as
enjoyable as wearing pantyhose to work when it's like 90 degrees
outside. Seriously, let's try to break this down....

1)Objects in Perl. This can sort of blow monkey's butt if you've never
really done OOP or dealt with pointers in C.

2)regular expressions. I liken this to a bad hangover.

3)Pipes in Perl. This only really starts to make sense if you've
written pipes on Linux, BSD, or any other kind of half baked,
delinquent descent of the UNIX Operating system.

4)Back to Objects in Perl. Somewhere in the 10,000 pages of internal
Perl documents, there is a section on how Perl has no kind of privacy
thingy. It goes on to say that one way to enforce privacy in Objects is
to use closures. I'm sure closures make sense if you are computer
science major.

5)Fork() and pseudo tty's. Just the thought alone inspires fear and
awe.

And of course, I've dealt with this all for writing small/dirty scripts
on my OS. For anything else, there is either C, Java (ughhh...), or
FORTRAN (leet).

Chad


Randal L. Schwartz 12-24-2006 01:23 AM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
>>>>> "grocery" == grocery stocker <cdalten@gmail.com> writes:

grocery> Yes, basic Perl s fairly easy. However, the funky Perl is about as
grocery> enjoyable as wearing pantyhose to work when it's like 90 degrees
grocery> outside. Seriously, let's try to break this down....

A guy named "Chad" knows about this. Hmm. :)

grocery> 1)Objects in Perl. This can sort of blow monkey's butt if you've
grocery> never really done OOP or dealt with pointers in C.

Yeah, Objects *require* references, and the average docs on references and
objects suggest that you know objects and pointers from other languages.

grocery> 2)regular expressions. I liken this to a bad hangover.

The important thing to keep in mind is that they're an entirely separate part
of the language, unlike anything else in Perl, but luckily like lots of other
tools.

grocery> 3)Pipes in Perl. This only really starts to make sense if you've
grocery> written pipes on Linux, BSD, or any other kind of half baked,
grocery> delinquent descent of the UNIX Operating system.

Perl has no native "pipes". Not sure what you're saying here.

grocery> 4)Back to Objects in Perl. Somewhere in the 10,000 pages of internal
grocery> Perl documents, there is a section on how Perl has no kind of privacy
grocery> thingy. It goes on to say that one way to enforce privacy in Objects
grocery> is to use closures. I'm sure closures make sense if you are computer
grocery> science major.

Or use one of the many "Inside Out Objects" modules on the CPAN, where most of
the magic is hidden for you.

grocery> 5)Fork() and pseudo tty's. Just the thought alone inspires fear and
grocery> awe.

Fork is standard Unix Fork. Pseudo TTYs ditto. Perl doesn't have anything
weird to contribute here.

print "Just another Perl hacker,"; # the original (# 0 ?)

--
Randal L. Schwartz - Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc. - +1 503 777 0095
<merlyn@stonehenge.com> <URL:http://www.stonehenge.com/merlyn/>
Perl/Unix/security consulting, Technical writing, Comedy, etc. etc.
See PerlTraining.Stonehenge.com for onsite and open-enrollment Perl training!

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Tad McClellan 12-24-2006 01:34 AM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
KDOSS_PERL <kdoss@comcast.net> wrote:

> Subject: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX



The one that suggests that you do not SHOUT AT PEOPLE.


> I would like to use Perl scripts and
> was wondering if there are any recommendations for a guy with my kind
> of back ground.



Any of the tutorials mentioned in the Perl FAQ.

perldoc -q book

...

Tutorials
Beginning Perl
by James Lee
ISBN 1‐59059‐391‐X [2nd edition August 2004]
http://apress.com/book/bookDisplay.html?bID=344

Elements of Programming with Perl
by Andrew L. Johnson
ISBN 1‐884777‐80‐5 [1st edition October 1999]
http://www.manning.com/Johnson/

Learning Perl
by Randal L. Schwartz, Tom Phoenix, and brian d foy
ISBN 0‐596‐10105‐8 [4th edition July 2005]
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/learnperl4/

Learning Perl Objects, References, and Modules
by Randal L. Schwartz, with Tom Phoenix (foreword by Damian Conway)
ISBN 0‐596‐00478‐8 [1st edition June 2003]
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/lrnperlorm/


--
Tad McClellan SGML consulting
tadmc@augustmail.com Perl programming
Fort Worth, Texas

Tad McClellan 12-24-2006 01:38 AM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
Ric <antispam@randometry.com> wrote:
> KDOSS_PERL schrieb:
>> Greetings to PERL Programmers:
>>
>> I've been an Unix System Administrator writing crude shell scripts for
>> the past 15 years. I never got into writing sophisticated scripting
>> with multiple looks for my jobs. I would like to use Perl scripts and
>> was wondering if there are any recommendations for a guy with my kind
>> of back ground. Any input from your guys would be most appreciated.

>
> You probably want to use some beginners book, Perl in 21 days or
> Learning Perl O'Reilly



One of those books is horrid, one of them is good...


> Perl is fairly easy and usually you don't program sophisticated large

^^^
> scale applications with perl,



Of course he doesn't, because he doesn't even know _any_ Perl yet!

If your "you" was the general "you", then that's a lot of hooey.

I've written several Perl projects that were sophisticated large
scale applications (5-10k lines of code each).


--
Tad McClellan SGML consulting
tadmc@augustmail.com Perl programming
Fort Worth, Texas

grocery_stocker 12-24-2006 05:43 AM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 

Randal L. Schwartz wrote:
> >>>>> "grocery" == grocery stocker <cdalten@gmail.com> writes:

>
> grocery> Yes, basic Perl s fairly easy. However, the funky Perl is about as
> grocery> enjoyable as wearing pantyhose to work when it's like 90 degrees
> grocery> outside. Seriously, let's try to break this down....
>
> A guy named "Chad" knows about this. Hmm. :)
>


Calm down.

> grocery> 1)Objects in Perl. This can sort of blow monkey's butt if you've
> grocery> never really done OOP or dealt with pointers in C.
>
> Yeah, Objects *require* references, and the average docs on references and
> objects suggest that you know objects and pointers from other languages.
>
> grocery> 2)regular expressions. I liken this to a bad hangover.
>
> The important thing to keep in mind is that they're an entirely separate part
> of the language, unlike anything else in Perl, but luckily like lots of other
> tools.
>
> grocery> 3)Pipes in Perl. This only really starts to make sense if you've
> grocery> written pipes on Linux, BSD, or any other kind of half baked,
> grocery> delinquent descent of the UNIX Operating system.
>
> Perl has no native "pipes". Not sure what you're saying here.
>


I was thinking something like the following. Please note the script had
been slightly modified to protect th person from who I duped the core
code from.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @months = ("sep", "oct", "nov");
my $value = scalar (@months);
my $count = 0;

my $test = "oct";
my $bbs = "/usr/local/bin/bbs $test";

open my $out, '|-', $bbs
or die "cannot open pipe to bbsread: $!";


print $out "find gay | wc -l \n";

close $out
or die "cannot close pipe to bbsread: $!";


Let's pretend the bbs program runs on a Windows machine. Wouldn't
Windows mimic the Unix pipe() functions in the above script? If that is
the case, then wouldn't the behavior of the pipe() functions be similar
the behavior of the Unix pipe() functions?

> grocery> 4)Back to Objects in Perl. Somewhere in the 10,000 pages of internal
> grocery> Perl documents, there is a section on how Perl has no kind of privacy
> grocery> thingy. It goes on to say that one way to enforce privacy in Objects
> grocery> is to use closures. I'm sure closures make sense if you are computer
> grocery> science major.
>
> Or use one of the many "Inside Out Objects" modules on the CPAN, where most of
> the magic is hidden for you.
>
> grocery> 5)Fork() and pseudo tty's. Just the thought alone inspires fear and
> grocery> awe.
>
> Fork is standard Unix Fork. Pseudo TTYs ditto. Perl doesn't have anything
> weird to contribute here.
>


Chad


grocery_stocker 12-24-2006 05:50 AM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
> I was thinking something like the following. Please note the script had
> been slightly modified to protect th person from who I duped the core
> code from.


Going slightly off topic. I really need to learn to proof read before I
post.


Peter Scott 12-24-2006 12:09 PM

Re: BEST PERL BOOK FOR SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION UNIX
 
On Sat, 23 Dec 2006 13:19:44 -0800, KDOSS_PERL wrote:
> I've been an Unix System Administrator writing crude shell scripts for
> the past 15 years. I never got into writing sophisticated scripting
> with multiple looks for my jobs. I would like to use Perl scripts and
> was wondering if there are any recommendations for a guy with my kind
> of back ground. Any input from your guys would be most appreciated.


There is a new book that I reviewed in the latest _Perl Review_ that is
explicitly targeted at your niche. I suggest you look at it:
http://www.amazon.com/Minimal-Perl-U.../dp/1932394508

--
Peter Scott
http://www.perlmedic.com/
http://www.perldebugged.com/



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