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Xah Lee 09-27-2006 03:03 AM

Computer Language Popularity Trend
 

Computer Language Popularity Trend

This page gives a visual report of computer languages's popularity, as
indicated by their traffic level in newsgroups. This is not a
comprehensive or fair survey, but does give some indications of
popularity trends.

http://xahlee.org/lang_traf/index.html

Xah
xah@xahlee.org
http://xahlee.org/


Danno 09-27-2006 05:56 AM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 

Xah Lee wrote:
> Computer Language Popularity Trend
>
> This page gives a visual report of computer languages's popularity, as
> indicated by their traffic level in newsgroups. This is not a
> comprehensive or fair survey, but does give some indications of
> popularity trends.
>
> http://xahlee.org/lang_traf/index.html
>
> Xah
> xah@xahlee.org
> ∑ http://xahlee.org/


Wow, java is a low level industrial language? ;)


Mirco Wahab 09-27-2006 07:29 AM

Battlefield Weapon Popularity Trend (was: Computer Language PopularityTrend)
 
Thus spoke Xah Lee (on 2006-09-27 05:03):

> This page gives a visual report of computer languages's
> popularity, as indicated by their traffic level in newsgroups.
> ...
> http://xahlee.org/lang_traf/index.html


When the Samurai of medieval Japan were confronted
with new 'battlefield language', e.g. early Shotguns,
they resisted because one could push any peasant
behind a gun -- thus nullifying the result of
the Samurai Art of Warfare that required a life
full of learning - in the end wiping out a
complete culture.

Same trend here - the reason is: 'cost' ;-)


Regards & scnr

Mirco

f'up: clpm, clp



mark.hoemmen@gmail.com 09-27-2006 09:37 AM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 

Xah Lee wrote:
> Computer Language Popularity Trend
>
> This page gives a visual report of computer languages's popularity, as
> indicated by their traffic level in newsgroups. This is not a
> comprehensive or fair survey, but does give some indications of
> popularity trends.
>
> http://xahlee.org/lang_traf/index.html


Careful there with the sweeping generalizations and quick judgments
about languages :)

Furthermore, it's nice to conclude that Lisp is getting more popular,
but we also have to take into account global trends (maybe more people
are using usenet in general? maybe the total number of programmers in
the world is increasing?).

Still, it's nice to see trends plotted out like that, thanks for the
work :)

mfh


Jon Ribbens 09-27-2006 09:43 AM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 
In article <1159349867.827187.270390@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups .com>, mark.hoemmen@gmail.com wrote:
>> http://xahlee.org/lang_traf/index.html

>
> Careful there with the sweeping generalizations and quick judgments
> about languages :)


I just read "PHP as a language is rather dry and business-like",
and fell off my chair.

James Stroud 09-27-2006 10:54 AM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 
mark.hoemmen@gmail.com wrote:
> Xah Lee wrote:
>> Computer Language Popularity Trend
>>
>> This page gives a visual report of computer languages's popularity, as
>> indicated by their traffic level in newsgroups. This is not a
>> comprehensive or fair survey, but does give some indications of
>> popularity trends.
>>
>> http://xahlee.org/lang_traf/index.html

>
> Careful there with the sweeping generalizations and quick judgments
> about languages :)
>
> Furthermore, it's nice to conclude that Lisp is getting more popular,
> but we also have to take into account global trends (maybe more people
> are using usenet in general? maybe the total number of programmers in
> the world is increasing?).
>
> Still, it's nice to see trends plotted out like that, thanks for the
> work :)
>
> mfh
>


Finally, a contribution of substance from lambda. Who woulda thunk it?

cartercc@gmail.com 09-27-2006 12:15 PM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 
I, too, attempt to track the popularity of computer languages, but I
like to look at the job boards. My theory is that the number of
employers looking for particular skills indicates the relative
popularity of the language. This is a somewhat crude measure,
particularly with Microsoft technologies (VB, VB6, VB.NET, VS, etc). I
think it's much more reliable with open source languages, such as Java,
Perl, PHP, and so on.

'Popularity' is a slippery concept as well. C isn't real popular in
terms of jobs, but it is in terms of compensation. In system
administration (which I also follow), Windows has large numbers of
jobs, but a low level of compensation. OSes like AIX on the other hand
have lower numbers of available jobs, but those tend to be more highly
compensated. One could argue that compensation is a function of
popularity, with the more unpoular technologies having carrying a
bigger price to attract more people -- an example of supply and demand
-- but then one would have to argue that garbade collectors should be
more highly compensated that physicians.

You can also get a rough measure ot the popularity of web scripting
languages from an analysis of the URLs. The last time I did this was in
2003, and as I recall, these were the results:
PHP 30% and increasing
Perl 28% and falling
ASP 25% and falling fast
ColdFusion 6% and steady
Java and JSP 5% and increasing
others, Python, Ruby, ...

Again, this is a very rough measure. Java, for instance, is used by big
companies (like auto manufacturers, aerospace industries, defense
contractors, big retailers, etc.) One site/one vote isn't
representative necessarily, plus the bigger companies employ more
people than the smaller companies that tend to use FOSS.

Finally, in my area, we have a lot of banking and insurance jobs. These
companies internally are exclusively Microsoft shops. It's virtually
impossible to work there unless you know Visual Studio and SQL Server.
Misrosoft people tend not to prowl the newsgroups, and I would suspect
that any measurement based on numbers of newsgroup postings would be
skewed for this reason.

CC


Sherm Pendley 09-27-2006 04:01 PM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 
"mark.hoemmen@gmail.com" <mark.hoemmen@gmail.com> writes:

> Xah Lee wrote:
>> Computer Language Popularity Trend
>>

>
> Careful there with the sweeping generalizations and quick judgments


Such things are all Xah does. Look at the distribution list for this
message - of what possible use is cross-posting something like this to
five different language groups, unless you're trying to start a cross-
group argument?

In short - Please don't feed the trolls.

sherm--

--
Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net

Joe Marshall 09-27-2006 04:26 PM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 

Xah Lee wrote:
> Computer Language Popularity Trend
>
> This page gives a visual report of computer languages's popularity, as
> indicated by their traffic level in newsgroups. This is not a
> comprehensive or fair survey, but does give some indications of
> popularity trends.


Suggestions:
Provide a log-scale plot. You can clearly see that there are
exponential trends in the data, these will turn into lines in
log-scale. You can also see that the plots get more widely distributed
as the number of posts increase. This too will be minimized in
log-scale.

Make the horizontal scale for the `scripting' languages the same as
the others. I know there isn't data out on the left of the graph, but
it surprised me to see points out there until I noticed the scale
change.

For the Google trends, try looking for `java programming' or `written
in python' to avoid picking up the island and the popular comedy troupe.


sjdevnull@yahoo.com 09-27-2006 04:51 PM

Re: Computer Language Popularity Trend
 
cartercc@gmail.com wrote:
> You can also get a rough measure ot the popularity of web scripting
> languages from an analysis of the URLs. The last time I did this was in
> 2003, and as I recall, these were the results:
> PHP 30% and increasing
> Perl 28% and falling
> ASP 25% and falling fast
> ColdFusion 6% and steady
> Java and JSP 5% and increasing
> others, Python, Ruby, ...


At the site I'm working on, you'd see a URL like
http://www.whatever.com/login or http://www.whatever.com/boards?id=131
-- how would you count them? Such (extensionless) URLs are far more
common in the Python, Ruby, and Java world in my experience than the
PHP, Perl, and ASP world, so my first instinct looking at your numbers
is to believe they're just biased toward languages that more often put
the extension in the URL.



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