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-   -   [QUIZ] The Turing Machine (#162) (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t850222-quiz-the-turing-machine-162-a.html)

Matthew Moss 05-09-2008 03:48 PM

[QUIZ] The Turing Machine (#162)
 
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

The three rules of Ruby Quiz 2:

1. Please do not post any solutions or spoiler discussion for this
quiz until 48 hours have passed from the time on this message.

2. Support Ruby Quiz 2 by submitting ideas as often as you can! (A
permanent, new website is in the works for Ruby Quiz 2. Until then,
please visit the temporary website at

<http://matthew.moss.googlepages.com/home>.

3. Enjoy!

Suggestion: A [QUIZ] in the subject of emails about the problem
helps everyone on Ruby Talk follow the discussion. Please reply to
the original quiz message, if you can.

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

## The Turing Machine

_Quiz description by James Edward Gray II_

The Turing Machine is a simple computing architecture dating all the
way back to the 1930s. While extremely primitive compared to any
modern machine, there has been a lot of research showing that a Turing
Machine is capable of just about anything the fancier machines can do
(although much less efficiently, of course).

This week's task is to build a Turing Machine, so we can play around
with the architecture.

A Turing Machine has but three simple parts:

* A single state register.
* An infinite tape of memory cells that can hold one character
each, with a
read/write head that points to one of these cells at any given
time. The
tape is filled with an infinite run of blank characters in
either
direction.
* A finite set of program instructions. The program is just a big
table of
state transitions. The Turing Machine will look up an
instruction based
the current value of the state register and the current
character under
head of the tape. That instruction will provide a state for
the
register, a character to place in the current memory cell, and
an order to
move the head to the left or the right.

To keep our Turning Machine simple, let's say that our state register
can contain words matching the regular expression `/\w+/` and the tape
only contains characters that match the expression `/\w/`. We will
call our blank tape cell character the underscore.

Program lines will be of the form:

CurrentState _ NewState C R

The above translates to: if the current state is CurrentState and the
character under the tape head is our blank character, set the state to
NewState, replace the blank character with a C, and move the tape head
to the right one position. All five elements will be present in each
line and separated by one or more whitespace characters. Allow for
trailing comments (using #) on a line, comment only lines, and blank
lines in the program by ignoring all three.

The initial state of your Turing machine should be set to the
CurrentState mentioned on the first line of the program. Optionally,
the initial contents of the tape can be provided when the program is
load, but it will default to an all blank tape. The program runs
until it fails to find an instruction for the CurrentState and the
character currently under the tape head, at which point it prints the
current contents of the tape head from the first non-blank character
to the last non-blank character and exits.

Here's a sample run of a simple program through my Turing Machine so
you can see how this plays out:

$ cat palindrome.tm
# Report whether a string of 0 and 1 (ie. a binary
# number) is a palindrome.
look_first 0 go_end_0 _ R
look_first 1 go_end_1 _ R
look_first _ write_es Y R
go_end_0 0 go_end_0 0 R
go_end_0 1 go_end_0 1 R
go_end_0 _ check_end_0 _ L
go_end_1 0 go_end_1 0 R
go_end_1 1 go_end_1 1 R
go_end_1 _ check_end_1 _ L
check_end_0 0 ok_rewind _ L
check_end_0 1 fail_rewind _ L
check_end_0 _ ok_rewind _ L
check_end_1 0 fail_rewind _ L
check_end_1 1 ok_rewind _ L
check_end_1 _ ok_rewind _ L
ok_rewind 0 ok_rewind 0 L
ok_rewind 1 ok_rewind 1 L
ok_rewind _ look_first _ R
fail_rewind 0 fail_rewind _ L
fail_rewind 1 fail_rewind _ L
fail_rewind _ write_o N R
write_es _ write_s e R
write_o _ done o R
write_s _ done s R

$ ruby tm.rb palindrome.tm 011010110
Yes

$ ruby tm.rb palindrome.tm 01101
No



Matthew Moss 05-09-2008 03:56 PM

Re: The Turing Machine (#162)
 
> 2. Support Ruby Quiz 2 by submitting ideas as often as you can! (A
> permanent, new website is in the works for Ruby Quiz 2. Until then,
> please visit the temporary website at
>
> <http://matthew.moss.googlepages.com/home>.



Forgot to put in the revised URL for the less-temporary website:

<http://www.splatbang.com/rubyquiz>


Chris Shea 05-09-2008 07:29 PM

Re: The Turing Machine (#162)
 
On May 9, 9:48 am, Matthew Moss <matthew.m...@gmail.com> wrote:
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
>
> The three rules of Ruby Quiz 2:
>
> 1. Please do not post any solutions or spoiler discussion for this
> quiz until 48 hours have passed from the time on this message.
>
> 2. Support Ruby Quiz 2 by submitting ideas as often as you can! (A
> permanent, new website is in the works for Ruby Quiz 2. Until then,
> please visit the temporary website at
>
> <http://matthew.moss.googlepages.com/home>.
>
> 3. Enjoy!
>
> Suggestion: A [QUIZ] in the subject of emails about the problem
> helps everyone on Ruby Talk follow the discussion. Please reply to
> the original quiz message, if you can.
>
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
>
> ## The Turing Machine
>
> _Quiz description by James Edward Gray II_
>
> The Turing Machine is a simple computing architecture dating all the
> way back to the 1930s. While extremely primitive compared to any
> modern machine, there has been a lot of research showing that a Turing
> Machine is capable of just about anything the fancier machines can do
> (although much less efficiently, of course).
>
> This week's task is to build a Turing Machine, so we can play around
> with the architecture.
>
> A Turing Machine has but three simple parts:
>
> * A single state register.
> * An infinite tape of memory cells that can hold one character
> each, with a
> read/write head that points to one of these cells at any given
> time. The
> tape is filled with an infinite run of blank characters in
> either
> direction.
> * A finite set of program instructions. The program is just a big
> table of
> state transitions. The Turing Machine will look up an
> instruction based
> the current value of the state register and the current
> character under
> head of the tape. That instruction will provide a state for
> the
> register, a character to place in the current memory cell, and
> an order to
> move the head to the left or the right.
>
> To keep our Turning Machine simple, let's say that our state register
> can contain words matching the regular expression `/\w+/` and the tape
> only contains characters that match the expression `/\w/`. We will
> call our blank tape cell character the underscore.
>
> Program lines will be of the form:
>
> CurrentState _ NewState C R
>
> The above translates to: if the current state is CurrentState and the
> character under the tape head is our blank character, set the state to
> NewState, replace the blank character with a C, and move the tape head
> to the right one position. All five elements will be present in each
> line and separated by one or more whitespace characters. Allow for
> trailing comments (using #) on a line, comment only lines, and blank
> lines in the program by ignoring all three.
>
> The initial state of your Turing machine should be set to the
> CurrentState mentioned on the first line of the program. Optionally,
> the initial contents of the tape can be provided when the program is
> load, but it will default to an all blank tape. The program runs
> until it fails to find an instruction for the CurrentState and the
> character currently under the tape head, at which point it prints the
> current contents of the tape head from the first non-blank character
> to the last non-blank character and exits.
>
> Here's a sample run of a simple program through my Turing Machine so
> you can see how this plays out:
>
> $ cat palindrome.tm
> # Report whether a string of 0 and 1 (ie. a binary
> # number) is a palindrome.
> look_first 0 go_end_0 _ R
> look_first 1 go_end_1 _ R
> look_first _ write_es Y R
> go_end_0 0 go_end_0 0 R
> go_end_0 1 go_end_0 1 R
> go_end_0 _ check_end_0 _ L
> go_end_1 0 go_end_1 0 R
> go_end_1 1 go_end_1 1 R
> go_end_1 _ check_end_1 _ L
> check_end_0 0 ok_rewind _ L
> check_end_0 1 fail_rewind _ L
> check_end_0 _ ok_rewind _ L
> check_end_1 0 fail_rewind _ L
> check_end_1 1 ok_rewind _ L
> check_end_1 _ ok_rewind _ L
> ok_rewind 0 ok_rewind 0 L
> ok_rewind 1 ok_rewind 1 L
> ok_rewind _ look_first _ R
> fail_rewind 0 fail_rewind _ L
> fail_rewind 1 fail_rewind _ L
> fail_rewind _ write_o N R
> write_es _ write_s e R
> write_o _ done o R
> write_s _ done s R
>
> $ ruby tm.rb palindrome.tm 011010110
> Yes
>
> $ ruby tm.rb palindrome.tm 01101
> No


I created another program for our Turning machines that reverses a
string of zeros and ones.

$ cat reverse.tm
# Reverses a string of 0s and 1s
mark_start 0 mark_start 0 L
mark_start 1 mark_start 1 L
mark_start _ mark_end S R

mark_end 0 mark_end 0 R
mark_end 1 mark_end 1 R
mark_end _ rewind E L

rewind 0 rewind 0 L
rewind 1 rewind 1 L
rewind S read_first S R

read_first 0 append_0 _ L
read_first 1 append_1 _ L
read_first _ read_first _ R
read_first E erase_marks _ L

erase_marks _ erase_marks _ L
erase_marks S done _ L

append_0 S write_0 S L
append_0 0 append_0 0 L
append_0 1 append_0 1 L
append_0 _ append_0 _ L

append_1 S write_1 S L
append_1 0 append_1 0 L
append_1 1 append_1 1 L
append_1 _ append_1 _ L

write_0 0 write_0 0 L
write_0 1 write_0 1 L
write_0 _ find_start 0 R

write_1 0 write_1 0 L
write_1 1 write_1 1 L
write_1 _ find_start 1 R

find_start 0 find_start 0 R
find_start 1 find_start 1 R
find_start S read_first S R

$ ruby tm.rb reverse.tm 1011
1101


The names of the states could probably use some improvement, and maybe
there's a more efficient implementation, but there it is. I hope
others share some.

Chris

Adam Shelly 05-09-2008 09:39 PM

Re: The Turing Machine (#162)
 
On 5/9/08, Chris Shea <cmshea@gmail.com> wrote:
> I created another program for our Turning machines that reverses a
> string of zeros and ones.

...
> I hope others share some.
>

Here's a simple one.

$ cat add1.rb
#adds 1 to a binary number
seekLSB 1 seekLSB 1 R
seekLSB 0 seekLSB 0 R
seekLSB _ add1 _ L
add1 1 add1 0 L
add1 0 done 1 L
add1 _ done 1 L

$ruby turing.rb add1.rb 0
1
$ruby turing.rb add1.rb 1011
1100

-Adam


Chiyuan Zhang 05-10-2008 04:23 AM

Re: [QUIZ] The Turing Machine (#162)
 
Does it mean the tape head move action can only be [RL] ? Is there an
instruction for not moving the head?

On Fri, May 9, 2008 at 11:48 PM, Matthew Moss <matthew.moss@gmail.com> wrote:
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
>
> The three rules of Ruby Quiz 2:
>
> 1. Please do not post any solutions or spoiler discussion for this
> quiz until 48 hours have passed from the time on this message.
>
> 2. Support Ruby Quiz 2 by submitting ideas as often as you can! (A
> permanent, new website is in the works for Ruby Quiz 2. Until then,
> please visit the temporary website at
>
> <http://matthew.moss.googlepages.com/home>.
>
> 3. Enjoy!
>
> Suggestion: A [QUIZ] in the subject of emails about the problem
> helps everyone on Ruby Talk follow the discussion. Please reply to
> the original quiz message, if you can.
>
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
>
> ## The Turing Machine
>
> _Quiz description by James Edward Gray II_
>
> The Turing Machine is a simple computing architecture dating all the
> way back to the 1930s. While extremely primitive compared to any
> modern machine, there has been a lot of research showing that a Turing
> Machine is capable of just about anything the fancier machines can do
> (although much less efficiently, of course).
>
> This week's task is to build a Turing Machine, so we can play around
> with the architecture.
>
> A Turing Machine has but three simple parts:
>
> * A single state register.
> * An infinite tape of memory cells that can hold one character
> each, with a
> read/write head that points to one of these cells at any given
> time. The
> tape is filled with an infinite run of blank characters in
> either
> direction.
> * A finite set of program instructions. The program is just a big
> table of
> state transitions. The Turing Machine will look up an
> instruction based
> the current value of the state register and the current
> character under
> head of the tape. That instruction will provide a state for
> the
> register, a character to place in the current memory cell, and
> an order to
> move the head to the left or the right.
>
> To keep our Turning Machine simple, let's say that our state register
> can contain words matching the regular expression `/\w+/` and the tape
> only contains characters that match the expression `/\w/`. We will
> call our blank tape cell character the underscore.
>
> Program lines will be of the form:
>
> CurrentState _ NewState C R
>
> The above translates to: if the current state is CurrentState and the
> character under the tape head is our blank character, set the state to
> NewState, replace the blank character with a C, and move the tape head
> to the right one position. All five elements will be present in each
> line and separated by one or more whitespace characters. Allow for
> trailing comments (using #) on a line, comment only lines, and blank
> lines in the program by ignoring all three.
>
> The initial state of your Turing machine should be set to the
> CurrentState mentioned on the first line of the program. Optionally,
> the initial contents of the tape can be provided when the program is
> load, but it will default to an all blank tape. The program runs
> until it fails to find an instruction for the CurrentState and the
> character currently under the tape head, at which point it prints the
> current contents of the tape head from the first non-blank character
> to the last non-blank character and exits.
>
> Here's a sample run of a simple program through my Turing Machine so
> you can see how this plays out:
>
> $ cat palindrome.tm
> # Report whether a string of 0 and 1 (ie. a binary
> # number) is a palindrome.
> look_first 0 go_end_0 _ R
> look_first 1 go_end_1 _ R
> look_first _ write_es Y R
> go_end_0 0 go_end_0 0 R
> go_end_0 1 go_end_0 1 R
> go_end_0 _ check_end_0 _ L
> go_end_1 0 go_end_1 0 R
> go_end_1 1 go_end_1 1 R
> go_end_1 _ check_end_1 _ L
> check_end_0 0 ok_rewind _ L
> check_end_0 1 fail_rewind _ L
> check_end_0 _ ok_rewind _ L
> check_end_1 0 fail_rewind _ L
> check_end_1 1 ok_rewind _ L
> check_end_1 _ ok_rewind _ L
> ok_rewind 0 ok_rewind 0 L
> ok_rewind 1 ok_rewind 1 L
> ok_rewind _ look_first _ R
> fail_rewind 0 fail_rewind _ L
> fail_rewind 1 fail_rewind _ L
> fail_rewind _ write_o N R
> write_es _ write_s e R
> write_o _ done o R
> write_s _ done s R
>
> $ ruby tm.rb palindrome.tm 011010110
> Yes
>
> $ ruby tm.rb palindrome.tm 01101
> No
>
>
>




--
pluskid


James Gray 05-10-2008 04:42 AM

Re: [QUIZ] The Turing Machine (#162)
 
On May 9, 2008, at 11:23 PM, Chiyuan Zhang wrote:

> Does it mean the tape head move action can only be [RL] ? Is there an
> instruction for not moving the head?


Correct, the tape moves with each instruction.

James Edward Gray II


Glen F. Pankow 05-10-2008 05:22 AM

Re: The Turing Machine (#162)
 
Chris Shea wrote:
> ... I hope others share some.


Below is a (very ugly) machine to convert binary to octal,
since it seems binary is the popular test representation.

$ ruby quiz-162 to_oct.tm
0

$ ruby quiz-162 to_oct.tm 0
0

$ ruby quiz-162 to_oct.tm 101
5

$ ruby quiz-162 to_oct.tm 000001010011100101110111
1234567

An annotated example:
$ ruby quiz-162 to_oct.tm 0011101
# Span to the end of the binary digits; mark the end.
span_end 0 -> span_endB 0 R : >0< 0 1 1 1 0 1
span_endB 0 -> span_endB 0 R : 0 >0< 1 1 1 0 1
span_endB 1 -> span_endB 1 R : 0 0 >1< 1 1 0 1
span_endB 1 -> span_endB 1 R : 0 0 1 >1< 1 0 1
span_endB 1 -> span_endB 1 R : 0 0 1 1 >1< 0 1
span_endB 0 -> span_endB 0 R : 0 0 1 1 1 >0< 1
span_endB 1 -> span_endB 1 R : 0 0 1 1 1 0 >1<
span_endB _ -> cvt_xxx X L : 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 >_<
# Convert each set of three binary digits to an octal digit.
cvt_xxx 1 -> cvt_xx1 _ L : 0 0 1 1 1 0 >1< X
cvt_xx1 0 -> cvt_x01 _ L : 0 0 1 1 1 >0< _ X
cvt_x01 1 -> cvt_xxx 5 L : 0 0 1 1 >1< _ _ X
cvt_xxx 1 -> cvt_xx1 _ L : 0 0 1 >1< 5 _ _ X
cvt_xx1 1 -> cvt_x11 _ L : 0 0 >1< _ 5 _ _ X
cvt_x11 0 -> cvt_xxx 3 L : 0 >0< _ _ 5 _ _ X
cvt_xxx 0 -> cvt_xx0 _ L : >0< 3 _ _ 5 _ _ X
cvt_xx0 _ -> squeeze 0 L : >_< _ 3 _ _ 5 _ _ X
# Squeeze intervening spaces.
squeeze _ -> squeezeA _ R : >_< 0 _ 3 _ _ 5 _ _ X
squeezeA 0 -> squeezeA _ R : _ >0< _ 3 _ _ 5 _ _ X
squeezeA _ -> squeezeA _ R : _ _ >_< 3 _ _ 5 _ _ X
squeezeA 3 -> squeezeB 3 R : _ _ _ >3< _ _ 5 _ _ X
squeezeB _ -> squeezeC X R : _ _ _ 3 >_< _ 5 _ _ X
squeezeC _ -> squeezeC _ R : _ _ _ 3 X >_< 5 _ _ X
squeezeC 5 -> squeeze5 _ L : _ _ _ 3 X _ >5< _ _ X
squeeze5 _ -> squeeze5 _ L : _ _ _ 3 X >_< _ _ _ X
squeeze5 X -> squeezeD 5 R : _ _ _ 3 >X< _ _ _ _ X
squeezeD _ -> squeezeC X R : _ _ _ 3 5 >_< _ _ _ X
squeezeC _ -> squeezeC _ R : _ _ _ 3 5 X >_< _ _ X
squeezeC _ -> squeezeC _ R : _ _ _ 3 5 X _ >_< _ X
squeezeC _ -> squeezeC _ R : _ _ _ 3 5 X _ _ >_< X
squeezeC X -> squeezeX _ L : _ _ _ 3 5 X _ _ _ >X<
squeezeX _ -> squeezeX _ L : _ _ _ 3 5 X _ _ >_< _
squeezeX _ -> squeezeX _ L : _ _ _ 3 5 X _ >_< _ _
squeezeX _ -> squeezeX _ L : _ _ _ 3 5 X >_< _ _ _
squeezeX X -> __done__ _ L : _ _ _ 3 5 >X< _ _ _ _
__done__ 5 -> --none-- : _ _ _ 3 >5< _ _ _ _ _
---> '35'

$ cat to_oct.tm

#
# Convert binary to octal.
#

#
# Span to the end of the binary digits; mark the end.
#
span_end 0 span_endB 0 R
span_end 1 span_endB 1 R
span_end _ __done__ 0 R
span_endB 0 span_endB 0 R
span_endB 1 span_endB 1 R
span_endB _ cvt_xxx X L

#
# Convert each set of three binary digits to an octal digit.
#
cvt_xxx 0 cvt_xx0 _ L
cvt_xxx 1 cvt_xx1 _ L
cvt_xxx _ squeeze 0 L

cvt_xx0 0 cvt_x00 _ L
cvt_xx0 1 cvt_x10 _ L
cvt_xx0 _ squeeze 0 L

cvt_x00 0 cvt_xxx 0 L
cvt_x00 1 cvt_xxx 4 L
cvt_x00 _ squeeze 0 L

cvt_x10 0 cvt_xxx 2 L
cvt_x10 1 cvt_xxx 6 L
cvt_x10 _ squeeze 2 L

cvt_xx1 0 cvt_x01 _ L
cvt_xx1 1 cvt_x11 _ L
cvt_xx1 _ squeeze 1 L

cvt_x01 0 cvt_xxx 1 L
cvt_x01 1 cvt_xxx 5 L
cvt_x01 _ squeeze 1 L

cvt_x11 0 cvt_xxx 3 L
cvt_x11 1 cvt_xxx 7 L
cvt_x11 _ squeeze 3 L

#
# Squeeze intervening spaces.
#
squeeze _ squeeze _ R
squeeze 0 squeeze _ R
squeeze 1 squeezeB 1 R
squeeze 2 squeezeB 2 R
squeeze 3 squeezeB 3 R
squeeze 4 squeezeB 4 R
squeeze 5 squeezeB 5 R
squeeze 6 squeezeB 6 R
squeeze 7 squeezeB 7 R
squeeze X __done__ 0 R
squeezeB _ squeezeC X R
squeezeC _ squeezeC _ R

squeezeC 0 squeeze0 _ L
squeeze0 _ squeeze0 _ L
squeeze0 X squeezeD 0 R
squeezeD _ squeezeC X R

squeezeC 1 squeeze1 _ L
squeeze1 _ squeeze1 _ L
squeeze1 X squeezeD 1 R

squeezeC 2 squeeze2 _ L
squeeze2 _ squeeze2 _ L
squeeze2 X squeezeD 2 R

squeezeC 3 squeeze3 _ L
squeeze3 _ squeeze3 _ L
squeeze3 X squeezeD 3 R

squeezeC 4 squeeze4 _ L
squeeze4 _ squeeze4 _ L
squeeze4 X squeezeD 4 R

squeezeC 5 squeeze5 _ L
squeeze5 _ squeeze5 _ L
squeeze5 X squeezeD 5 R

squeezeC 6 squeeze6 _ L
squeeze6 _ squeeze6 _ L
squeeze6 X squeezeD 6 R

squeezeC 7 squeeze7 _ L
squeeze7 _ squeeze7 _ L
squeeze7 X squeezeD 7 R

squeezeC X squeezeX _ L
squeezeX _ squeezeX _ L
squeezeX X __done__ _ L


Juanger 05-10-2008 05:57 AM

Re: [QUIZ] The Turing Machine (#162)
 
In fact, both representations are equivalent(the one that has the option to
stay in the same cell and the one that doesn't).
In our case, you will have to use another state to emulate that behaviour.

On Fri, May 9, 2008 at 11:42 PM, James Gray <james@grayproductions.net>
wrote:

> On May 9, 2008, at 11:23 PM, Chiyuan Zhang wrote:
>
> Does it mean the tape head move action can only be [RL] ? Is there an
>> instruction for not moving the head?
>>

>
> Correct, the tape moves with each instruction.
>
> James Edward Gray II
>
>



--=20
Ash Mac durbatul=FBk, ash Mac gimbatul, ash Mac thrakatul=FBk agh burzum-is=
hi
krimpatul.
Juanger.


Adam Shelly 05-10-2008 09:11 PM

Re: The Turing Machine (#162)
 
On Fri, May 9, 2008 at 10:22 PM, Glen F. Pankow <Glen.F.Pankow@noaa.gov> wrote:
> Chris Shea wrote:
>> ... I hope others share some.

>
> Below is a (very ugly) machine to convert binary to octal,
> since it seems binary is the popular test representation.
>

That's an interesting solution. When I wrote my binary to hex
converter I took a fairly different approach. I think binary is
popular because it limits the number of state transitions required.
Compare my seekLSB state to the exitHex state - both do the same
thing, but the one that supports hex is 6 times bigger.
-Adam

--------------
## bin2hex.tm
## converts binary to hex
## by creating an accumulator (the store)
## to the left of the input, and moving one
## bit at a time from the input to the store

#first find the MSB of the input
seekMSB 1 seekMSB 1 L
seekMSB 0 seekMSB 0 L
seekMSB _ makeStore _ L

#creates the storage for the hex value: tape:= 0_<input>
makeStore _ moveRight 0 R

#goes to lsb of input
moveRight _ seekLSB _ R
seekLSB 1 seekLSB 1 R
seekLSB 0 seekLSB 0 R
seekLSB _ dec _ L

#decrement binary, starting from LSB
#when we get to a 1 we are done
#if we get to a _ we must have started with all 0s .
dec 0 dec 1 L
dec 1 findStore 0 L
dec _ clearRight _ R #so just cleanup the original input

#seeks back to the store
findStore 0 findStore 0 L
findStore 1 findStore 1 L
findStore _ addToStore _ L

#adds 1 to store
addToStore _ exitHex 1 R
addToStore 0 exitHex 1 R
addToStore 1 exitHex 2 R
addToStore 2 exitHex 3 R
addToStore 3 exitHex 4 R
addToStore 4 exitHex 5 R
addToStore 5 exitHex 6 R
addToStore 6 exitHex 7 R
addToStore 7 exitHex 8 R
addToStore 8 exitHex 9 R
addToStore 9 exitHex A R
addToStore A exitHex B R
addToStore B exitHex C R
addToStore C exitHex D R
addToStore D exitHex E R
addToStore E exitHex F R
addToStore F addToStore 0 L #carry

#move head back into the input
exitHex 0 exitHex 0 R
exitHex 1 exitHex 1 R
exitHex 2 exitHex 2 R
exitHex 3 exitHex 3 R
exitHex 4 exitHex 4 R
exitHex 5 exitHex 5 R
exitHex 6 exitHex 6 R
exitHex 7 exitHex 7 R
exitHex 8 exitHex 8 R
exitHex 9 exitHex 9 R
exitHex A exitHex A R
exitHex B exitHex B R
exitHex C exitHex C R
exitHex D exitHex D R
exitHex E exitHex E R
exitHex F exitHex F R
exitHex _ seekLSB _ R

#erase a binary string to the right
clearRight 0 clearRight _ R
clearRight 1 clearRight _ R
clearRight _ done _ L #done cleanup, ready to print


Matthew Moss 05-11-2008 04:20 AM

Re: The Turing Machine (#162)
 
Just so you guys know, I have no intentions of starting Turning
Machine Quiz. I have enough work to do as it is writing summaries for
Ruby Quiz, and I *really* don't want to read a bunch of turing machine
code.


:) Just kidding...


(No I'm not. ;)



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