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-   -   Win 7 RC multi-boot (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t683006-win-7-rc-multi-boot.html)

Jerry 05-07-2009 08:53 PM

Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.

Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.

Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is capable
of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.

Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.

Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from XP and
32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.

Any reason this won't work?

Thanks.




Jane C 05-07-2009 09:21 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
Jerry wrote:
> Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.
>
> Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.
>
> Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is capable
> of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.
>
> Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
> partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.
>
> Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from XP and
> 32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.
>
> Any reason this won't work?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
>


As long as you have the partitons already available, you should have no
problems. Just remember which one is which before installing :)

--
Jane, not plain ;) 64 bit enabled :-)
Batteries not included. Braincell on vacation ;-)
MVP - Windows Desktop Experience 2007-2009

Carlos 05-07-2009 10:20 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
And that every time he boots into XP, all Win 7 restore points will be lost.
Carlos

"Jane C" wrote:

> Jerry wrote:
> > Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.
> >
> > Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.
> >
> > Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is capable
> > of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.
> >
> > Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
> > partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.
> >
> > Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from XP and
> > 32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.
> >
> > Any reason this won't work?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> >
> >

>
> As long as you have the partitons already available, you should have no
> problems. Just remember which one is which before installing :)
>
> --
> Jane, not plain ;) 64 bit enabled :-)
> Batteries not included. Braincell on vacation ;-)
> MVP - Windows Desktop Experience 2007-2009
>


R. C. White 05-08-2009 04:57 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
Hi, Jerry.

You got it! ;<)

I've been multi-booting since WinNT4/Win95 and now have about a half-dozen
Windows installations (WinXP, Vista and Win7, both x86 and x64 versions of
some). Each is In a separate logical drive in the extended partition on one
of my first 2 HDDs. (The last 2 drives are in a RAID 1 mirror reserved for
data and a few apps, not operating systems.) The new 1 TB Seagate that I
got last year still has plenty of space left for more volumes - but I'm
running out of drive letters so I'll have to delete some older OS partitions
soon.

You've already learned the Golden Rule of dual-booting: Install the newest
OS last. Each Setup knows how to handle earlier versions, but older
versions have no idea what to do with systems that didn't exist when that
Setup was written.

A few other tips:
1. Be well acquainted with Disk Management! This tool first appeared in
Windows 2000, but many users - even veterans - still haven't found it.
There are several ways to get there; my favorite is just to press Start,
type in "diskmgmt.msc" and press Enter.

2. Always NAME your volumes. That way, you'll not be TOO confused when
"Win7x86" is Drive C: when you are running Win7 x86 and Drive E: when you
are booted into Vista. It will still be Win7x86 in both systems, even with
different letters.

3. If you want to have consistent drive letters among the various OSes,
then first boot into WinXP and run Disk Management. Create all your volumes
and assign the letters you want - and they don't all have to be sequential.
(I'm currently running Win7 x64 RC in Drive X:, the 10th volume on Disk 1.)
Then insert the Win7 DVD and run Setup from the WinXP desktop, so that it
can "see" and respect the letters you've assigned. If you boot from the
DVD, then Setup will start from scratch and assign C: to its own boot
volume, requiring the system volume be changed, probably to D:, and other
letters to be reassigned, too.

4. Make the System Partition (see KB 314470 for the COUNTERintuitive
definitions of "system volume" and "boot volume", and get comfortable with
those definitions) small - 1 GB is probably more than enough - and use it
only for your startup files. For WinXP, these are NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and
Boot.ini; Vista and Win7 use bootmgr, bootsect.dos and the BCD (Boot
Configuration Data) files in the hidden \Boot folder in this partition. All
the rest of each OS should go into the \Windows folder on each boot volume.
Then you'll be able to wipe out and reformat any of the partitions without
bothering any of the others. (If you have multiple HDDs, it's good
insurance to create a small System Partition on each of them and install the
latest Windows at least once while each is the boot device so that Setup can
write the startup files to it. That way, if Disk 0 won't boot, you can
still boot from Disk 1 - to fix Disk 0.)

5. Win7 has a smaller on-disk footprint than Vista, since Windows Mail
and other features are no longer imbedded in it. But it tends to grow after
installation! While 20 GB might be enough to start, make those volumes at
least 30 GB each and even larger, since you have "plenty of hard drive
space".

6. Oh, one more. If this is your first 64-bit system, you might be
surprised to find a new folder in addition to Program Files, this one named
"Program Files (x86)". This new PF86 folder is NOT for 64-bit programs, as
I first thought, since it didn't exist in WinXP Pro. In 64-bit Windows, the
PF file is reserved for 64-bit apps; 32-bit apps go into the new PF86.
Windows uses these folders to select the proper drivers and other support
files, depending on the "bitness" of the app.

I guess that's enough for now. If you have questions, please post back.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
rc@grandecom.net
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100

"Jerry" <ChiefZekeNoSpam@MSN.com> wrote in message
news:#Iv6tX1zJHA.5764@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.
>
> Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.
>
> Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is
> capable of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.
>
> Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
> partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.
>
> Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from XP
> and 32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.
>
> Any reason this won't work?
>
> Thanks.



Jerry 05-09-2009 08:40 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
R.C. - thanks for all the info.

I have two each 1Tb drives already partitioned into four pieces each and
formatted in FAT32 - each partition has a drive letter and name.

My understanding is Win7 requires NTFS - so I would assume I should
convert two of these partitions first to NTFS - one for 32-bit and one for
64-bit - and format and name them as I want. I used Partition Commander
rather than
Disk Management to set these drives up and Partition Commander will make
changes from FAT32 to NTFS.

In 3 below you said to run the Win7 install from within XP - I do know you
cannot upgrade XP to Win7 so I'm assuming here that the Win7 install
routine will point to a separate loction to install Win7? Also, will this
process
edit boot.ini, or whatever it is Win7 calls it, to establish a dual- then
multi-boot configuration as I first install the 32-bit version then the
64-bit version?

Again - thanks

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:eBsCA4$zJHA.4800@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Jerry.
>
> You got it! ;<)
>
> I've been multi-booting since WinNT4/Win95 and now have about a half-dozen
> Windows installations (WinXP, Vista and Win7, both x86 and x64 versions of
> some). Each is In a separate logical drive in the extended partition on
> one of my first 2 HDDs. (The last 2 drives are in a RAID 1 mirror
> reserved for data and a few apps, not operating systems.) The new 1 TB
> Seagate that I got last year still has plenty of space left for more
> volumes - but I'm running out of drive letters so I'll have to delete some
> older OS partitions soon.
>
> You've already learned the Golden Rule of dual-booting: Install the
> newest OS last. Each Setup knows how to handle earlier versions, but
> older versions have no idea what to do with systems that didn't exist when
> that Setup was written.
>
> A few other tips:
> 1. Be well acquainted with Disk Management! This tool first appeared
> in Windows 2000, but many users - even veterans - still haven't found it.
> There are several ways to get there; my favorite is just to press Start,
> type in "diskmgmt.msc" and press Enter.
>
> 2. Always NAME your volumes. That way, you'll not be TOO confused when
> "Win7x86" is Drive C: when you are running Win7 x86 and Drive E: when you
> are booted into Vista. It will still be Win7x86 in both systems, even
> with different letters.
>
> 3. If you want to have consistent drive letters among the various OSes,
> then first boot into WinXP and run Disk Management. Create all your
> volumes and assign the letters you want - and they don't all have to be
> sequential. (I'm currently running Win7 x64 RC in Drive X:, the 10th
> volume on Disk 1.) Then insert the Win7 DVD and run Setup from the WinXP
> desktop, so that it can "see" and respect the letters you've assigned. If
> you boot from the DVD, then Setup will start from scratch and assign C: to
> its own boot volume, requiring the system volume be changed, probably to
> D:, and other letters to be reassigned, too.
>
> 4. Make the System Partition (see KB 314470 for the COUNTERintuitive
> definitions of "system volume" and "boot volume", and get comfortable with
> those definitions) small - 1 GB is probably more than enough - and use it
> only for your startup files. For WinXP, these are NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and
> Boot.ini; Vista and Win7 use bootmgr, bootsect.dos and the BCD (Boot
> Configuration Data) files in the hidden \Boot folder in this partition.
> All the rest of each OS should go into the \Windows folder on each boot
> volume. Then you'll be able to wipe out and reformat any of the partitions
> without bothering any of the others. (If you have multiple HDDs, it's
> good insurance to create a small System Partition on each of them and
> install the latest Windows at least once while each is the boot device so
> that Setup can write the startup files to it. That way, if Disk 0 won't
> boot, you can still boot from Disk 1 - to fix Disk 0.)
>
> 5. Win7 has a smaller on-disk footprint than Vista, since Windows Mail
> and other features are no longer imbedded in it. But it tends to grow
> after installation! While 20 GB might be enough to start, make those
> volumes at least 30 GB each and even larger, since you have "plenty of
> hard drive space".
>
> 6. Oh, one more. If this is your first 64-bit system, you might be
> surprised to find a new folder in addition to Program Files, this one
> named "Program Files (x86)". This new PF86 folder is NOT for 64-bit
> programs, as I first thought, since it didn't exist in WinXP Pro. In
> 64-bit Windows, the PF file is reserved for 64-bit apps; 32-bit apps go
> into the new PF86. Windows uses these folders to select the proper drivers
> and other support files, depending on the "bitness" of the app.
>
> I guess that's enough for now. If you have questions, please post back.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100
>
> "Jerry" <ChiefZekeNoSpam@MSN.com> wrote in message
> news:#Iv6tX1zJHA.5764@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>> Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.
>>
>> Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.
>>
>> Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is
>> capable of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.
>>
>> Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
>> partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.
>>
>> Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from XP
>> and 32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.
>>
>> Any reason this won't work?
>>
>> Thanks.

>





R. C. White 05-10-2009 02:59 AM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
Hi, Jerry.

> I have two each 1Tb drives already partitioned into four pieces each and
> formatted in FAT32 - each partition has a drive letter and name.


Why FAT32 in this day and age? Unless you have a valid special reason, make
it NTFS all the way!

> convert two of these partitions first to NTFS - one for 32-bit and one for


Why convert? Just use Disk Management to format them NTFS. Or let Win7
Setup handle the formatting as a first step in installing Win7. You're
going to be doing Clean Installs, so let Win7 Setup handle the formatting.

> I used Partition Commander rather than
> Disk Management to set these drives up and Partition Commander will make
> changes from FAT32 to NTFS.


I've never used Partition Commander, and seldom needed anything other than
Disk Management since it appeared in Win2K. And the built-in command
"convert" will easily and quickly convert from FAT32 to NTFS - if you don't
simply format volumes in NTFS to start with.

> In 3 below you said to run the Win7 install from within XP


Yes! Boot into WinXP, insert the Win7 x86 disk and run Setup.exe from that
disk. It might just Autorun Setup if you wait several seconds. Then reboot
into either WinXP or Win7 x86 and do it again with the Win7 x64 disk.

> I do know you
> cannot upgrade XP to Win7


I didn't know that. I think the word is that upgrade to the RC is possible,
but not supported, but that upgrade from WinXP to the final Win7 will be
supported. But, in my experience, even going back into the Win9xes, most
users who upgraded later went back and did a clean install anyway because of
all the niggling little problems that never seemed to go away after the
upgrade. Also, at least one Vista-to-Win7RC upgrader reported that it took
several hours, compared to a half-hour for a clean install.

> so I'm assuming here that the Win7 install
> routine will point to a separate loction to install Win7?


No. YOU will point to a new location. Win7 Setup will show you all the
available partitions and allow you to choose. It will also show you any
unpartitioned space and offer to create a partition there and format it for
you, if it is a large enough space.

> Also, will this process
> edit boot.ini, or whatever it is Win7 calls it, to establish a dual- then
> multi-boot configuration as I first install the 32-bit version then the
> 64-bit version?


Not exactly. See my original point 4. When the first Win7 is installed,
Setup will not destroy the WinXP boot system, but will install the Win7
system alongside those files in the system partition. On each reboot
thereafter, Win7's BCD will present the OS menu choices. One (or more) of
those choices will be Win7; another will be "An earlier version of Windows".
When you choose the "earlier version", the BCD will kind of step back out of
the way and turn control over to bootsect.dos, the saved version of the
WinXP boot sector, which will find NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini. From
this point, the computer will forget about Win7, except that something is
taking up a lot of disk space. When you choose Win7, the system will ignore
the WinXP files, again except for something taking up disk space.

When the second Win7 (x64) is installed, it will just update the BCD to add
the additional Win7 installation. One hassle is that you will have two
identical menu choices of "Microsoft Windows 7". The computer is happy to
work with the duplicate entries, but you will need to use the built-in
BCDEdit.exe - or a friendlier third-party utility - to edit at least one of
those entries so that you can tell them apart. You'll probably want to make
one say something like Win7x64. (This is not new behavior; multi-booters
often had to choose between identical "Windows XP" options until they edited
Boot.ini.)

You've already done the hard part: bought the HDDs. And you've already
partitioned them, which Win7 would have been happy to do for you. Now, all
you have to do is boot into WinXP, insert the Win7 x86 DVD, run Setup - and
follow the prompts. Choose which partition to use for 32-bit Win7 and let
Setup install it there, including reformatting that partition. Then reboot
into either WinXP or Win7 x86, insert the Win7 x64 DVD...lather, rinse,
repeat. ;^)

The hardest part of the transition will probably be breaking out of the
WinXP mindset. Win7 (and Vista) look a lot like WinXP on the surface. But
there are many differences under the hood. If you try to use Win7 like you
do WinXP, you'll have troubles and frustration. But if you take the time
and make the effort to understand how and why Win7 is different, you will
soon "stop trying to find the clutch pedal and let the automatic
transmission do the shifting for you". And like so many who have tried
Vista or Win7 for more than a week or two, you won't dream of going back to
WinXP. ;<)

If you run into any problems, post back. But thousands (millions?) of users
have done it already. I'm sure you can, too.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
rc@grandecom.net
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100

"Jerry" <ChiefZekeNoSpam@MSN.com> wrote in message
news:efdqdZO0JHA.1900@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
> R.C. - thanks for all the info.
>
> I have two each 1Tb drives already partitioned into four pieces each and
> formatted in FAT32 - each partition has a drive letter and name.
>
> My understanding is Win7 requires NTFS - so I would assume I should
> convert two of these partitions first to NTFS - one for 32-bit and one for
> 64-bit - and format and name them as I want. I used Partition Commander
> rather than
> Disk Management to set these drives up and Partition Commander will make
> changes from FAT32 to NTFS.
>
> In 3 below you said to run the Win7 install from within XP - I do know you
> cannot upgrade XP to Win7 so I'm assuming here that the Win7 install
> routine will point to a separate loction to install Win7? Also, will this
> process
> edit boot.ini, or whatever it is Win7 calls it, to establish a dual- then
> multi-boot configuration as I first install the 32-bit version then the
> 64-bit version?
>
> Again - thanks
>
> "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
> news:eBsCA4$zJHA.4800@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> Hi, Jerry.
>>
>> You got it! ;<)
>>
>> I've been multi-booting since WinNT4/Win95 and now have about a
>> half-dozen Windows installations (WinXP, Vista and Win7, both x86 and x64
>> versions of some). Each is In a separate logical drive in the extended
>> partition on one of my first 2 HDDs. (The last 2 drives are in a RAID 1
>> mirror reserved for data and a few apps, not operating systems.) The new
>> 1 TB Seagate that I got last year still has plenty of space left for more
>> volumes - but I'm running out of drive letters so I'll have to delete
>> some older OS partitions soon.
>>
>> You've already learned the Golden Rule of dual-booting: Install the
>> newest OS last. Each Setup knows how to handle earlier versions, but
>> older versions have no idea what to do with systems that didn't exist
>> when that Setup was written.
>>
>> A few other tips:
>> 1. Be well acquainted with Disk Management! This tool first appeared
>> in Windows 2000, but many users - even veterans - still haven't found it.
>> There are several ways to get there; my favorite is just to press Start,
>> type in "diskmgmt.msc" and press Enter.
>>
>> 2. Always NAME your volumes. That way, you'll not be TOO confused
>> when "Win7x86" is Drive C: when you are running Win7 x86 and Drive E:
>> when you are booted into Vista. It will still be Win7x86 in both
>> systems, even with different letters.
>>
>> 3. If you want to have consistent drive letters among the various
>> OSes, then first boot into WinXP and run Disk Management. Create all
>> your volumes and assign the letters you want - and they don't all have to
>> be sequential. (I'm currently running Win7 x64 RC in Drive X:, the 10th
>> volume on Disk 1.) Then insert the Win7 DVD and run Setup from the WinXP
>> desktop, so that it can "see" and respect the letters you've assigned.
>> If you boot from the DVD, then Setup will start from scratch and assign
>> C: to its own boot volume, requiring the system volume be changed,
>> probably to D:, and other letters to be reassigned, too.
>>
>> 4. Make the System Partition (see KB 314470 for the COUNTERintuitive
>> definitions of "system volume" and "boot volume", and get comfortable
>> with those definitions) small - 1 GB is probably more than enough - and
>> use it only for your startup files. For WinXP, these are NTLDR,
>> NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini; Vista and Win7 use bootmgr, bootsect.dos and
>> the BCD (Boot Configuration Data) files in the hidden \Boot folder in
>> this partition. All the rest of each OS should go into the \Windows
>> folder on each boot volume. Then you'll be able to wipe out and reformat
>> any of the partitions without bothering any of the others. (If you have
>> multiple HDDs, it's good insurance to create a small System Partition on
>> each of them and install the latest Windows at least once while each is
>> the boot device so that Setup can write the startup files to it. That
>> way, if Disk 0 won't boot, you can still boot from Disk 1 - to fix Disk
>> 0.)
>>
>> 5. Win7 has a smaller on-disk footprint than Vista, since Windows Mail
>> and other features are no longer imbedded in it. But it tends to grow
>> after installation! While 20 GB might be enough to start, make those
>> volumes at least 30 GB each and even larger, since you have "plenty of
>> hard drive space".
>>
>> 6. Oh, one more. If this is your first 64-bit system, you might be
>> surprised to find a new folder in addition to Program Files, this one
>> named "Program Files (x86)". This new PF86 folder is NOT for 64-bit
>> programs, as I first thought, since it didn't exist in WinXP Pro. In
>> 64-bit Windows, the PF file is reserved for 64-bit apps; 32-bit apps go
>> into the new PF86. Windows uses these folders to select the proper
>> drivers and other support files, depending on the "bitness" of the app.
>>
>> I guess that's enough for now. If you have questions, please post back.
>>
>> RC
>>
>> "Jerry" <ChiefZekeNoSpam@MSN.com> wrote in message
>> news:#Iv6tX1zJHA.5764@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>> Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.
>>>
>>> Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.
>>>
>>> Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is
>>> capable of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.
>>>
>>> Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
>>> partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.
>>>
>>> Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from XP
>>> and 32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.
>>>
>>> Any reason this won't work?
>>>
>>> Thanks.



Jerry 05-10-2009 04:07 AM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
R.C White

My comments below about not being able to upgrade from XP to Win7 are those
that are all over the Microsoft sites concerning Win7; every place
stipulates emphatically that there will be no upgrade path from XP to Win7.

Why FAT32 in this day and age? - because I have real-mode DOS programs I
like and I have been using for years. Plus, I've had a few friends that were
really frustrated with the differences between FAT and NTFS and really hated
the difference. Something about having to 'own this' or "take ownership of
that" - which I'm assuming is a function of NTFS.

I copied all your info and will be refering to it in the future as I install
the newer version.

Thanks
Jerry

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:uU76FtR0JHA.5288@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Jerry.
>
>> I have two each 1Tb drives already partitioned into four pieces each and
>> formatted in FAT32 - each partition has a drive letter and name.

>
> Why FAT32 in this day and age? Unless you have a valid special reason,
> make it NTFS all the way!
>
>> convert two of these partitions first to NTFS - one for 32-bit and one
>> for

>
> Why convert? Just use Disk Management to format them NTFS. Or let Win7
> Setup handle the formatting as a first step in installing Win7. You're
> going to be doing Clean Installs, so let Win7 Setup handle the formatting.
>
>> I used Partition Commander rather than
>> Disk Management to set these drives up and Partition Commander will make
>> changes from FAT32 to NTFS.

>
> I've never used Partition Commander, and seldom needed anything other than
> Disk Management since it appeared in Win2K. And the built-in command
> "convert" will easily and quickly convert from FAT32 to NTFS - if you
> don't simply format volumes in NTFS to start with.
>
>> In 3 below you said to run the Win7 install from within XP

>
> Yes! Boot into WinXP, insert the Win7 x86 disk and run Setup.exe from
> that disk. It might just Autorun Setup if you wait several seconds. Then
> reboot into either WinXP or Win7 x86 and do it again with the Win7 x64
> disk.
>
>> I do know you
>> cannot upgrade XP to Win7

>
> I didn't know that. I think the word is that upgrade to the RC is
> possible, but not supported, but that upgrade from WinXP to the final Win7
> will be supported. But, in my experience, even going back into the
> Win9xes, most users who upgraded later went back and did a clean install
> anyway because of all the niggling little problems that never seemed to go
> away after the upgrade. Also, at least one Vista-to-Win7RC upgrader
> reported that it took several hours, compared to a half-hour for a clean
> install.
>
>> so I'm assuming here that the Win7 install
>> routine will point to a separate loction to install Win7?

>
> No. YOU will point to a new location. Win7 Setup will show you all the
> available partitions and allow you to choose. It will also show you any
> unpartitioned space and offer to create a partition there and format it
> for you, if it is a large enough space.
>
>> Also, will this process
>> edit boot.ini, or whatever it is Win7 calls it, to establish a dual- then
>> multi-boot configuration as I first install the 32-bit version then the
>> 64-bit version?

>
> Not exactly. See my original point 4. When the first Win7 is installed,
> Setup will not destroy the WinXP boot system, but will install the Win7
> system alongside those files in the system partition. On each reboot
> thereafter, Win7's BCD will present the OS menu choices. One (or more) of
> those choices will be Win7; another will be "An earlier version of
> Windows". When you choose the "earlier version", the BCD will kind of step
> back out of the way and turn control over to bootsect.dos, the saved
> version of the WinXP boot sector, which will find NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM and
> Boot.ini. From this point, the computer will forget about Win7, except
> that something is taking up a lot of disk space. When you choose Win7,
> the system will ignore the WinXP files, again except for something taking
> up disk space.
>
> When the second Win7 (x64) is installed, it will just update the BCD to
> add the additional Win7 installation. One hassle is that you will have
> two identical menu choices of "Microsoft Windows 7". The computer is
> happy to work with the duplicate entries, but you will need to use the
> built-in BCDEdit.exe - or a friendlier third-party utility - to edit at
> least one of those entries so that you can tell them apart. You'll
> probably want to make one say something like Win7x64. (This is not new
> behavior; multi-booters often had to choose between identical "Windows XP"
> options until they edited Boot.ini.)
>
> You've already done the hard part: bought the HDDs. And you've already
> partitioned them, which Win7 would have been happy to do for you. Now,
> all you have to do is boot into WinXP, insert the Win7 x86 DVD, run
> Setup - and follow the prompts. Choose which partition to use for 32-bit
> Win7 and let Setup install it there, including reformatting that
> partition. Then reboot into either WinXP or Win7 x86, insert the Win7 x64
> DVD...lather, rinse, repeat. ;^)
>
> The hardest part of the transition will probably be breaking out of the
> WinXP mindset. Win7 (and Vista) look a lot like WinXP on the surface.
> But there are many differences under the hood. If you try to use Win7
> like you do WinXP, you'll have troubles and frustration. But if you take
> the time and make the effort to understand how and why Win7 is different,
> you will soon "stop trying to find the clutch pedal and let the automatic
> transmission do the shifting for you". And like so many who have tried
> Vista or Win7 for more than a week or two, you won't dream of going back
> to WinXP. ;<)
>
> If you run into any problems, post back. But thousands (millions?) of
> users have done it already. I'm sure you can, too.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100
>
> "Jerry" <ChiefZekeNoSpam@MSN.com> wrote in message
> news:efdqdZO0JHA.1900@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>> R.C. - thanks for all the info.
>>
>> I have two each 1Tb drives already partitioned into four pieces each and
>> formatted in FAT32 - each partition has a drive letter and name.
>>
>> My understanding is Win7 requires NTFS - so I would assume I should
>> convert two of these partitions first to NTFS - one for 32-bit and one
>> for
>> 64-bit - and format and name them as I want. I used Partition Commander
>> rather than
>> Disk Management to set these drives up and Partition Commander will make
>> changes from FAT32 to NTFS.
>>
>> In 3 below you said to run the Win7 install from within XP - I do know
>> you
>> cannot upgrade XP to Win7 so I'm assuming here that the Win7 install
>> routine will point to a separate loction to install Win7? Also, will this
>> process
>> edit boot.ini, or whatever it is Win7 calls it, to establish a dual- then
>> multi-boot configuration as I first install the 32-bit version then the
>> 64-bit version?
>>
>> Again - thanks
>>
>> "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
>> news:eBsCA4$zJHA.4800@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>>> Hi, Jerry.
>>>
>>> You got it! ;<)
>>>
>>> I've been multi-booting since WinNT4/Win95 and now have about a
>>> half-dozen Windows installations (WinXP, Vista and Win7, both x86 and
>>> x64 versions of some). Each is In a separate logical drive in the
>>> extended partition on one of my first 2 HDDs. (The last 2 drives are in
>>> a RAID 1 mirror reserved for data and a few apps, not operating
>>> systems.) The new 1 TB Seagate that I got last year still has plenty of
>>> space left for more volumes - but I'm running out of drive letters so
>>> I'll have to delete some older OS partitions soon.
>>>
>>> You've already learned the Golden Rule of dual-booting: Install the
>>> newest OS last. Each Setup knows how to handle earlier versions, but
>>> older versions have no idea what to do with systems that didn't exist
>>> when that Setup was written.
>>>
>>> A few other tips:
>>> 1. Be well acquainted with Disk Management! This tool first appeared
>>> in Windows 2000, but many users - even veterans - still haven't found
>>> it. There are several ways to get there; my favorite is just to press
>>> Start, type in "diskmgmt.msc" and press Enter.
>>>
>>> 2. Always NAME your volumes. That way, you'll not be TOO confused
>>> when "Win7x86" is Drive C: when you are running Win7 x86 and Drive E:
>>> when you are booted into Vista. It will still be Win7x86 in both
>>> systems, even with different letters.
>>>
>>> 3. If you want to have consistent drive letters among the various
>>> OSes, then first boot into WinXP and run Disk Management. Create all
>>> your volumes and assign the letters you want - and they don't all have
>>> to be sequential. (I'm currently running Win7 x64 RC in Drive X:, the
>>> 10th volume on Disk 1.) Then insert the Win7 DVD and run Setup from the
>>> WinXP desktop, so that it can "see" and respect the letters you've
>>> assigned. If you boot from the DVD, then Setup will start from scratch
>>> and assign C: to its own boot volume, requiring the system volume be
>>> changed, probably to D:, and other letters to be reassigned, too.
>>>
>>> 4. Make the System Partition (see KB 314470 for the COUNTERintuitive
>>> definitions of "system volume" and "boot volume", and get comfortable
>>> with those definitions) small - 1 GB is probably more than enough - and
>>> use it only for your startup files. For WinXP, these are NTLDR,
>>> NTDETECT.COM and Boot.ini; Vista and Win7 use bootmgr, bootsect.dos and
>>> the BCD (Boot Configuration Data) files in the hidden \Boot folder in
>>> this partition. All the rest of each OS should go into the \Windows
>>> folder on each boot volume. Then you'll be able to wipe out and reformat
>>> any of the partitions without bothering any of the others. (If you have
>>> multiple HDDs, it's good insurance to create a small System Partition on
>>> each of them and install the latest Windows at least once while each is
>>> the boot device so that Setup can write the startup files to it. That
>>> way, if Disk 0 won't boot, you can still boot from Disk 1 - to fix Disk
>>> 0.)
>>>
>>> 5. Win7 has a smaller on-disk footprint than Vista, since Windows
>>> Mail and other features are no longer imbedded in it. But it tends to
>>> grow after installation! While 20 GB might be enough to start, make
>>> those volumes at least 30 GB each and even larger, since you have
>>> "plenty of hard drive space".
>>>
>>> 6. Oh, one more. If this is your first 64-bit system, you might be
>>> surprised to find a new folder in addition to Program Files, this one
>>> named "Program Files (x86)". This new PF86 folder is NOT for 64-bit
>>> programs, as I first thought, since it didn't exist in WinXP Pro. In
>>> 64-bit Windows, the PF file is reserved for 64-bit apps; 32-bit apps go
>>> into the new PF86. Windows uses these folders to select the proper
>>> drivers and other support files, depending on the "bitness" of the app.
>>>
>>> I guess that's enough for now. If you have questions, please post back.
>>>
>>> RC
>>>
>>> "Jerry" <ChiefZekeNoSpam@MSN.com> wrote in message
>>> news:#Iv6tX1zJHA.5764@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>>> Presently running XP Pro w/SP3.
>>>>
>>>> Have downloaded Win 7 RC 32-bit and 64-bit and have burned two DVDs.
>>>>
>>>> Would like to multi-boot XP, Win 7 32, and Win 7 64. My hardware is
>>>> capable of 64 bit install, plenty of hard drive space also.
>>>>
>>>> Am assuming procedure would be to boot from Win 7 32 DVD and install in
>>>> partition separate from XP - results in dual-boot.
>>>>
>>>> Then boot from Win 7 64 DVD and install to a different partition from
>>>> XP and 32; resulting in multi-boot option: XP, Win7 32, and Win 7 64.
>>>>
>>>> Any reason this won't work?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks.

>





TMA 05-18-2009 08:16 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
> My comments below about not being able to upgrade from XP to Win7 are
> those that are all over the Microsoft sites concerning Win7; every place
> stipulates emphatically that there will be no upgrade path from XP to
> Win7.


Don't upgrade anything. Just boot up your computer off the Win7 install dvd
and you'll be fine

> Why FAT32 in this day and age? - because I have real-mode DOS programs I
> like and I have been using for years. Plus, I've had a few friends that
> were really frustrated with the differences between FAT and NTFS and
> really hated the difference. Something about having to 'own this' or "take
> ownership of that" - which I'm assuming is a function of NTFS.


Just forget about FAT32 as your main file system for your OS's. If you want
to keep compatibility with older softwares, just create a new
volume/partition with FAT32 and put your files in it. You can apply the
instructions above to make it visible, assign a drive letter and all. Other
than that, I'd recommend you to use NTFS for all your windows partitions
since XP.
NTFS allocates files much better than FAT32, it supports larger files, and
handles much better fragmented files (which are 100% of your files). In
other words, FAT32 is stone age, avoid it the best you can.

> I copied all your info and will be refering to it in the future as I
> install the newer version.


That's good to know.


As for the partitioning thingy, I'd recommend you to get all your volumes
pre-established before even running Win7 setup. You don't need to format
them because setup can do it, just create the unformatted partitions one for
each x64 and x32.

About Boot Commander or any other boot loader ... Windows 7 will automaticly
detect your installed OS'es and put them into its own boot loader (which is
a good one). So no need to install third party boot loaders. As you install
a new version, let's say win7 x64, it will automaticly adjust your main
drive's boot table and add the new OS to the list. No big deal, just keep
defaults. If you want to see/edit these options after installing, you can
run msconfig from any of the windows OS's you have.


McG. 05-22-2009 12:09 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 

"Carlos" <Carlos@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:3B42C602-CE0D-448F-879C-1D7A6A1860ED@microsoft.com...
> And that every time he boots into XP, all Win 7 restore points will be
> lost.
> Carlos


Does that include the scenario of XP Pro x64 SP2 and Windows 7 Ultimate 64
bit RC (7100) installed on separate hard disks? the dual boot was set by
W7.

McG.



Jerry 05-22-2009 08:48 PM

Re: Win 7 RC multi-boot
 
I would look here:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/...tegory/w7itpro for more
knowledgeable answers about Win7 RC.

"McG." <McGrandpaNOT@NOThotmail.com> wrote in message
news:OOO4$2s2JHA.6004@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>
> "Carlos" <Carlos@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:3B42C602-CE0D-448F-879C-1D7A6A1860ED@microsoft.com...
>> And that every time he boots into XP, all Win 7 restore points will be
>> lost.
>> Carlos

>
> Does that include the scenario of XP Pro x64 SP2 and Windows 7 Ultimate 64
> bit RC (7100) installed on separate hard disks? the dual boot was set by
> W7.
>
> McG.
>






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