Velocity Reviews

Velocity Reviews (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/index.php)
-   Digital Photography (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/f37-digital-photography.html)
-   -   Abstract paintings of Will Dockery (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t669307-abstract-paintings-of-will-dockery.html)

Will Dockery 02-06-2009 11:45 PM

Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 
I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
prefer.

These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:

http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F

Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.

--
"Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
http://www.myspace.com/willdockery



msifg 02-07-2009 12:34 AM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 

"Will Dockery" <will-dockery-group@knology.net> wrote in message
news:6fc28$498ccd9c$4b4c71e9$11090@KNOLOGY.NET...
> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
> some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
> you
> prefer.
>
> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
>
> http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
>
> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
>
> --
> "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
> http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
>
>



cool!

my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.

it's some of my favorite kind of art.

my dad paints on a regular basis.

thanks for sharing.

(sharks beware:
i've got a new pair of teeth.)


Orsen Wells w/Citizen Cain 02-07-2009 04:07 AM

Re: Abstract paintings of a lazy narcisstic douchebag
 

"Will Dockery" <will-dockery-group@knology.net> wrote in message
news:6fc28$498ccd9c$4b4c71e9$11090@KNOLOGY.NET...
> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which



mean about as much as a pre-schooler's glitter and glue art.


> some of you may have an interest in checking out,




No.





> for whichever reasons you
> prefer.
>
> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:



So basically, you accidentally melted something with one of your cigarettes,
and decided to put the can of Raid under your sink to something other than
its intended purpose. In the meantime, you probably vomited and after
scraping away the top layer, in your delusional and stupid mental state
decided to call the rest "art."


You're about as much as an artist as a cat walking across a piano is a
musician.



>
> http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
>
> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
>


It sucks, your work is worthless and would be better off being used to
psychologically torture 9/11 conspirators.



> --
> "I Might Be a Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
> http://www.myspace.com/willdockery
>
>




Will Dockery 02-07-2009 09:08 AM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 

"msifg" <gimel13@cox.net> wrote:
> "Will Dockery" wrote:
>
> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
> > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
> > you prefer.
> >
> > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

watercolor
> > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
> >
> > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
> >
> > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, are most

welcome.
>
> cool!
>
> my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.
>
> it's some of my favorite kind of art.
>
> my dad paints on a regular basis.


Are any of your father's works online anywhere? I'd like to check those out,
since abstract is by far my favorite form.

I hope to somedays get some of Sulzbach's work scanned and online, but he's
such a hermit-type, living out in the wouds of Alabama, it'll be some trick
getting that done.

> thanks for sharing.
>
> (sharks beware:
> i've got a new pair of teeth.)


This unsent post I just found in my "Drafts" section, from last year, of
another old-time artist friend of mine, you might enjoy, as well:

Here are galleries of Barfield, my teacher, who has been highly influenced
by Aborigine art and culture...

The art of Dan Barfield:

http://www.danbarfield.com/index.php

About Dan Barfield posted 2008-01-28 11:22:00 by Dan
I have often been asked by critics and students for the influences that have
shaped my "philosophy of art." I rattle off a few well known names and a few
well known "schools" of art which seems to satisfy them.The truth is....I
don't have a philosophy of art. My paintings grow out of my philosophy of
life and from the experiences of the life that I live and have lived since
childhood.

I grew up along the east coast between Savannah, Georgia and Jacksonville,
Florida, when that coast was still wild and undeveloped. School was a prison
for me, a thing to be endured only long enough to escape into the birdsong
silence and deep shadows of the woods and river swamps, or the sun washed
marshes and sea islands of the coast.
Then, as all teen-agers must, there came a time when I rebelled against this
life. I left this life behind and went to art school and college. I embraced
any road, any thought, any philosophy that took me away from that "old life"
which seemed somehow dull and meaningless. I learned all of the names and
catch phrases of the intellectual artist, embraced all of the currently
popular "schools," and lived the life of "artist as rock-and roll star." And
I did it well, getting my undergraduate degree in art from Columbus State,
and my Master of Fine Art from Savannah College of art and Design, showing
in Europe and America,wearing the laurels of success, never allowing myself
to admit that I was lying to myself and living someone else's life.

Then a major event in my life took place in which I lost everything. I was
living in my car with no home, eating at the Saint Francis mission in St.
Augustine, Florida, and being forced to rethink my life........In retrospect
it is the best thing that could have happened to me. I returned to the
beauty and basic truths of my childhood. I again embraced the beaauty of the
earth and the joy of being alive and free. This is where these paintings are
born.

GALLERY ONE posted 2008-01-28 10:29:41 by Dan
This is my personal favorite series. I have attempted to reach deep into the
human psyche here and create paintings that will be recognized across all
cultures and times. To this end I have worked flat with no attempt to make
them appear as anything except flat paintings on flat surfaces. There is no
attempt at perspective or depth; often there is no foreground, middleground,
or background. The colors are vivid and bright, the flora and fauna would
never be recognized by science, the fruits and flowers would never be found
in a florist or grocer....I hope that they are universal symbols of that
which they represent.

The observer will notice at once the power and importance of the sun symbol.
Actually the sun was usually the first thing painted and the rest of the
painting grew up around it. Those who have lived in the tropics will
understand this, as the sun is the ruler of the day and of all life.

The ruler of all life ....It has been suggested that the sun is a "god"
symbol in these paintings, and I am comfortable with that. (Note that I have
said a 'god symbol,' not a god....a symbol only.) The sun is the source of
all life as all energy comes from the sun...we are of the sun, we eat the
sun when we eat vegetables, or the meat that feeds on the vegetation.

Others have found a "Christian" image in the three "Ancestral Figures" that
stand guard with spears and huge erections over this fecund paradise.(I have
to admit that these figures are stolen from Australian rock paintings and
modified to suit my needs.)

I think I have said enough about these paintings now. I have a tendency to
get long winded and I would not want to color your perceptions. And after
all, art does not take place in the paint or on the wall; art does not take
place in the mind of the artists;...art takes place in the interaction
between the viewer and the painting. Art is a different experience for each
of us, modified or enhanced by our own unique experiences.

The Dream:
http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery1.php

GALLERY TWO posted 2008-01-28 10:04:00 by Dan
What can one say about these paintings? These are scenes that I have
stumbled across from the Low Country of South Carolina to the provinces of
the Philippines. Shrimp boats of the South Carolina and Georgia coast, a
lighthouse somewhere on the Golden Isles of Georgia; a mother and daughter
in Costa Rica, two young Filipino girls with the family's carabao...other
images of other times and places....

Oil on canvas; simple, but I enjoy the discipline needed to render a sceene
that exists on the outside of my mind....simple beauty of a simple life.

I hope that you, the viewer, enjoy them, that you are sensitive to the
beauty of them, and that they bring you happiness.

The Reality:
http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery2.php

--
"Wobble":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVIF2-qWIUc

Henry Conley: guitar
Riley Yielding: trumpet
Sir Charles: saxophone
Sam Phillips: bass
Brad Strickland: drums
Will Dockery: words

"Wobble" was written by Will Dockery & Henry Conley

"Last Dream Today":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSpYx8sSFP0

Brian Mallard - guitar
Dan Davidson - bass
Josh Railey - drums
Riley Yeilding - trumpet
Sir Charles - saxophone
Will Dockery - vocals

"Last Dream Today" was written by Will Dockery and Brian Mallard




msifg 02-07-2009 10:03 AM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 

"Will Dockery" <will-dockery-group@knology.net> wrote in message
news:c88eb$498d5194$4b4c71e9$24901@KNOLOGY.NET...
>
> "msifg" <gimel13@cox.net> wrote:
>> "Will Dockery" wrote:
>>
>> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
>> > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons
>> > you prefer.
>> >
>> > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

> watercolor
>> > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
>> >
>> > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
>> >
>> > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, are most

> welcome.
>>
>> cool!
>>
>> my dad just sent me a bunch of abstract art.
>>
>> it's some of my favorite kind of art.
>>
>> my dad paints on a regular basis.

>
> Are any of your father's works online anywhere? I'd like to check those
> out,
> since abstract is by far my favorite form.
>
> I hope to somedays get some of Sulzbach's work scanned and online, but
> he's
> such a hermit-type, living out in the wouds of Alabama, it'll be some
> trick
> getting that done.
>
>> thanks for sharing.
>>
>> (sharks beware:
>> i've got a new pair of teeth.)

>
> This unsent post I just found in my "Drafts" section, from last year, of
> another old-time artist friend of mine, you might enjoy, as well:
>
> Here are galleries of Barfield, my teacher, who has been highly influenced
> by Aborigine art and culture...
>
> The art of Dan Barfield:
>
> http://www.danbarfield.com/index.php
>
> About Dan Barfield posted 2008-01-28 11:22:00 by Dan
> I have often been asked by critics and students for the influences that
> have
> shaped my "philosophy of art." I rattle off a few well known names and a
> few
> well known "schools" of art which seems to satisfy them.The truth is....I
> don't have a philosophy of art. My paintings grow out of my philosophy of
> life and from the experiences of the life that I live and have lived since
> childhood.
>
> I grew up along the east coast between Savannah, Georgia and Jacksonville,
> Florida, when that coast was still wild and undeveloped. School was a
> prison
> for me, a thing to be endured only long enough to escape into the birdsong
> silence and deep shadows of the woods and river swamps, or the sun washed
> marshes and sea islands of the coast.
> Then, as all teen-agers must, there came a time when I rebelled against
> this
> life. I left this life behind and went to art school and college. I
> embraced
> any road, any thought, any philosophy that took me away from that "old
> life"
> which seemed somehow dull and meaningless. I learned all of the names and
> catch phrases of the intellectual artist, embraced all of the currently
> popular "schools," and lived the life of "artist as rock-and roll star."
> And
> I did it well, getting my undergraduate degree in art from Columbus State,
> and my Master of Fine Art from Savannah College of art and Design, showing
> in Europe and America,wearing the laurels of success, never allowing
> myself
> to admit that I was lying to myself and living someone else's life.
>
> Then a major event in my life took place in which I lost everything. I was
> living in my car with no home, eating at the Saint Francis mission in St.
> Augustine, Florida, and being forced to rethink my life........In
> retrospect
> it is the best thing that could have happened to me. I returned to the
> beauty and basic truths of my childhood. I again embraced the beaauty of
> the
> earth and the joy of being alive and free. This is where these paintings
> are
> born.
>
> GALLERY ONE posted 2008-01-28 10:29:41 by Dan
> This is my personal favorite series. I have attempted to reach deep into
> the
> human psyche here and create paintings that will be recognized across all
> cultures and times. To this end I have worked flat with no attempt to make
> them appear as anything except flat paintings on flat surfaces. There is
> no
> attempt at perspective or depth; often there is no foreground,
> middleground,
> or background. The colors are vivid and bright, the flora and fauna would
> never be recognized by science, the fruits and flowers would never be
> found
> in a florist or grocer....I hope that they are universal symbols of that
> which they represent.
>
> The observer will notice at once the power and importance of the sun
> symbol.
> Actually the sun was usually the first thing painted and the rest of the
> painting grew up around it. Those who have lived in the tropics will
> understand this, as the sun is the ruler of the day and of all life.
>
> The ruler of all life ....It has been suggested that the sun is a "god"
> symbol in these paintings, and I am comfortable with that. (Note that I
> have
> said a 'god symbol,' not a god....a symbol only.) The sun is the source of
> all life as all energy comes from the sun...we are of the sun, we eat the
> sun when we eat vegetables, or the meat that feeds on the vegetation.
>
> Others have found a "Christian" image in the three "Ancestral Figures"
> that
> stand guard with spears and huge erections over this fecund paradise.(I
> have
> to admit that these figures are stolen from Australian rock paintings and
> modified to suit my needs.)
>
> I think I have said enough about these paintings now. I have a tendency to
> get long winded and I would not want to color your perceptions. And after
> all, art does not take place in the paint or on the wall; art does not
> take
> place in the mind of the artists;...art takes place in the interaction
> between the viewer and the painting. Art is a different experience for
> each
> of us, modified or enhanced by our own unique experiences.
>
> The Dream:
> http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery1.php
>
> GALLERY TWO posted 2008-01-28 10:04:00 by Dan
> What can one say about these paintings? These are scenes that I have
> stumbled across from the Low Country of South Carolina to the provinces of
> the Philippines. Shrimp boats of the South Carolina and Georgia coast, a
> lighthouse somewhere on the Golden Isles of Georgia; a mother and daughter
> in Costa Rica, two young Filipino girls with the family's carabao...other
> images of other times and places....
>
> Oil on canvas; simple, but I enjoy the discipline needed to render a
> sceene
> that exists on the outside of my mind....simple beauty of a simple life.
>
> I hope that you, the viewer, enjoy them, that you are sensitive to the
> beauty of them, and that they bring you happiness.
>
> The Reality:
> http://www.danbarfield.com/gallery2.php
>
> --
> "Wobble":
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVIF2-qWIUc
>
> Henry Conley: guitar
> Riley Yielding: trumpet
> Sir Charles: saxophone
> Sam Phillips: bass
> Brad Strickland: drums
> Will Dockery: words
>
> "Wobble" was written by Will Dockery & Henry Conley
>
> "Last Dream Today":
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSpYx8sSFP0
>
> Brian Mallard - guitar
> Dan Davidson - bass
> Josh Railey - drums
> Riley Yeilding - trumpet
> Sir Charles - saxophone
> Will Dockery - vocals
>
> "Last Dream Today" was written by Will Dockery and Brian Mallard
>
>
>



my dad is very old and has never been interested
in sharing his art but with close friends and family.

we try to get him to go online like some of his
art friends. however, he really doesn't feel
like his work merits that kind of exposure.

i think it does. however, i'm far from an expert.



that dan barfeild stuff is abstract.
however, my dads stuff is more like yours.
the barfield stuff is pretty and phantasmagorical
in an otherworldly kind of way. it kept taking
me to the astral plane. that's some of my
favorite stuff. people who paint like
that usually don't get much exposure.
that's what makes it "art."

i'm not big on discussing paints and techniques
but i love sharing ideas like you just did.
my dad just offloaded a few paintings on to
me as gifts. at some point, i'll scan them
onto a webpage dedicated to him. i really
don't know what's going to happen to all of
his stuff when he goes. he's got hundreds
laying around the house.


Will Dockery 02-07-2009 03:29 PM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 

"Dale Houstman" <dmh7@skypoint.com> wrote:
> Will Dockery wrote:
>
> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
> > some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons

you
> > prefer.
> >
> > These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil,

watercolor
> > and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
> >
> > http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
> >
> > Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most

welcome.
> >

> They are all pretty much the same apart from being different colors. I


The photos were not taken by Martin Scorsese, but just a pal with a camera,
so first off they're not as crisp a veiw as you'd get if you were standing
in the shed with me, but that tossed off comment is typical of your lazy
commentary. I have to say if, say, you think that these two close-ups of a
section of two of the paintings:

http://tinyurl.com/green-planet

compared with

http://tinyurl.com/cqzktb

And still shrug and claim they're "pretty much the same", then you either
need a new pair of glasses, or you're indulging in your typical, and
tiresomely whining negativity game.

Why not try to get past your jealousy and open your eyes for once?

> suppose you think they're akin to Pollack's work, but Pollack is one of


Well, I love what I've seen of Pollack's art, yeah, although I've only seen
photographs of it. The person who probably influenced me more, since I did
spend several days looking at his paintings up close back in 1991 or so, was
Richard Pousette-Dart, when his paintings came to Shadowville on tour:

http://www.mannysilvermangallery.com...hronology.html

I saw these paintings, and I "got" them.

Unlike you, I looked long and hard at them, and began trying to "get"
something of my own.

I've met your type before, and /or course/ you were never in this place...
you shrugged your shoulders, took a glance and walked away, angry about how
"anyone can splash some pain on a canvas, so why should I bother?', since
you already did in your mind. I've also seen your type sitting by the bar,
or skulking behind the pool table, while a performer's onstage... "I can
play better than that..." or "Anyone can write that poetry crap, just string
some words together, and shuffle them in a deck of index cards...",
different faces, same old whine.

Which you've perfected to an art form of its own.

> those figures (like "e.e. cummings" in poetry) who - although marvelous
> in their own right - have served as "bad examples" and invitations to
> laziness for an entire generation of artists.


Or with your example, an invitation to a lazy shrug of the shoulders and an
"it's just paint splattered on a canvas".

Of course, you're as much an example of that "generation of artists",
yourself... it just boils down to the fact that you can't "tolerate" anyone
who excells at "your game", and thus your eternal cycle of agressively
attempting to tear down everything, every "abstract" poet or artist that
crosses your path... am I right? Deep down, you know I am.

With "cummings" it is the
> notion that if one just puts in enough punctuation, splits up words,


Or your added touch of shuffling them in a deck of index cards... heh.

> spells words oddly, etc. then poetry is inevitable.


Or, as with your poetry, the idea that (from the "bad example" of William
Burroughs) sentences chopped up and shuffled in a deck of index cards will
inevitably turn into a poem...

> The Beats obviously serve a similar function for you


While you've based your entire poetry "career" on the methods of William
Burroughs... project much?

> Here - in your "paintings" - you seem to think if


Key word: "seem to think".

You "seem" to be projecting your own lack of originality and "vision" on
me... for about the umpteenth time.

> you dribble enough colored crap on a canvas,


One of my methods is to use only "found" materials, which really does make
(in my opinion) a work which is the perfect expression of some "inner
passion", and better yet (as with the best poetry) a document of that
feeling, or whatever... but I know how you hate all that "mystic" "feelings"
stuff...

You glance at a poem and give a non-specific "plagiarism" libel, and
appatrently you have the same narrow-minded veiw of art... and I've never
seen you comment once on another poet besides yourself positively, which
smacks of a form of competitive jealousy, which is pretty unoriginal in
itself.

> But they are just charmless
> masses of direction-less non-intent.


Since I doubt you've even looked at them for more than 30 seconds, I'll just
shrug and give a "thanks for looking and commenting" back at you.

The contrast with Pollack's works
> is instructive: despite his being called a "dribbler" his works reveal
> intent, there is strength, energy, and a "rush toward an answer" to his
> lines: he is truly finding the "expression" in "abstract expressionism".


Plus his paintings have the name "Jackson Pollack" on them, right?

You're just a broken record of bitter negativity, perhaps because of your
own failures, I suppose?

> Yours are an (unintentional and unfunny) parody of his accomplishments,
> more a critique of what those who disliked his work thought his work was
> than an understanding of his vision.


Suddenly you pretend to have and/or "understand" a "vision"... heh.

> Yes Jackson also used housepaint, which has led to a set of preservation
> problems


A can of Clearcoat works wonders, pal... get over your bitterness at those
of us who can, and try to get "something" of your own done, perhaps? Thanks
for having a look and commenting, though... maybe someday you'll have
something useful to say rather than just project your own lack of
originality and "vision" on the rest of us who do work to those goals of
getting the vision down as art?

--
"Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:
http://www.myspace.com/willdockery




George Dance 02-07-2009 03:48 PM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 
On Feb 6, 6:45*pm, "Will Dockery" <will-dockery-gr...@knology.net>
wrote:
> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
> some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
> prefer.
>
> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:
>
> http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F
>
> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.
>



Reminds me of some of this guy's stuff:
http://www.skypoint.com/members/dmh7...s/Borborygmae/


In a couple of cases, (Ozone Stigmata being one I remember), I liked
your detail shot better than the full picture. For that reason I think
I'd appreciate the originals better if I could enlarge them and see
more detail. Not that I didn't like any of them. "Planet Fall" had a
composition I liked; I wouldn't be ashamed to have it on a wall of my
living room.

Unfortunately, this whole way of creating art reminds me of tossing
off -- just throwing something down and hopin the result is art. I see
too much of that in attempts to write poetry, on usenet and elsewyere,
and I don't like it here any better here than there. Occasionally a
good piece does result; but that's always too dependent on accident or
mere coincidence for my liking.






> --
> "Twilight Girl" and other song-poems by Will Dockery:http://www.myspace.com/willdockery



msifg 02-07-2009 03:57 PM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 

"Dale Houstman" <dmh7@skypoint.com> wrote in message
news:tK2dnbWSOYu2MxDUnZ2dnUVZ_vWdnZ2d@skypoint.com ...
> Savageduck wrote:
>
>>
>> Pollock is much maligned.
>> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only imagine
>> that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and intellect
>> (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He was unique.

>
> As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to like
> Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
> to think the art is in the dribble.
>
> dmh



well, now-
what have we here?
houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
of altering the posters name.

(a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)


George Dance 02-07-2009 04:01 PM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 
On Feb 7, 9:05*am, Savageduck <savaged...@savage.net> wrote:
> On 2009-02-07 04:24:20 -0800, Dale Houstman <d...@skypoint.com> said:
>
>
>
> > Will Dockery wrote:
> >> I've posted a new gallery of some of my recent abstract paintings, which
> >> some of you may have an interest in checking out, for whichever reasons you
> >> prefer.

>
> >> These paintings are made with a variety of materials from oil, watercolor
> >> and pastel paints, to housepaint, solvents and melted plastics:

>
> >>http://www.fototime.com/inv/E917106F136751F

>
> >> Comments and critique, as with all my work in all forms, is most welcome.

>
> > They are all pretty much the same apart from being different colors. I
> > suppose you think they're akin to Pollack's work, but Pollack is one of
> > those figures (like "e.e. cummings" in poetry) who - although marvelous
> > in their own right - have served as "bad examples" and invitations to
> > laziness for an entire generation of artists. With "cummings" it is the
> > notion that if one just puts in enough punctuation, splits up words,
> > spells words oddly, etc. then poetry is inevitable. The Beats obviously
> > serve a similar function for you and many other mediocre-to-terrible
> > performance "artists". Here - in your "paintings" - you seem to think
> > if you dribble enough colored crap on a canvas, it must - by some
> > universal law of cosmic kindness - create a work which is the perfect
> > expression of some inner passion you pretend to feel. But they are just
> > charmless masses of direction-less non-intent. The contrast with
> > Pollack's works is instructive: despite his being called a "dribbler"
> > his works reveal intent, there is strength, energy, and a "rush toward
> > an answer" to his lines: he is truly finding the "expression" in
> > "abstract expressionism". Yours are an (unintentional and unfunny)
> > parody of his accomplishments, more a critique of what those who
> > disliked his work thought his work was than an understanding of his
> > vision.

>
> > Yes Jackson also used housepaint, which has led to a set of
> > preservation problems: you needn't worry that this will happen in your
> > case - not one of these "paintings" needs to survive past next week.

>
> > dmh

>
> Pollock is much maligned.
> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only
> imagine that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and
> intellect (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He
> was unique.



Well, one major difference was that Pollock, unlike so many of his
imitators, was not just an "artist" but a painter; so he knew and was
able to use traditional rules or tools of composition in his work. Too
many wannabe "artists" never take the time to learn to be painters,
just as too many wannabe poets never take the time to learn to be
writers.




>
> Here is Pollock #2 at the Munson Williams Procter Arts Institute Utica
> NY,http://snipr.com/7or04-wiksca
> MWPhttp://www.mwpai.org/museum/collections/modernandcontemporary/
>
> --
> Regards,
> Savageduck



George Dance 02-07-2009 04:09 PM

Re: Abstract paintings of Will Dockery
 
On Feb 7, 10:57*am, "msifg" <gime...@cox.net> wrote:
> "Dale Houstman" <d...@skypoint.com> wrote in message
>
> news:tK2dnbWSOYu2MxDUnZ2dnUVZ_vWdnZ2d@skypoint.com ...
>
> > Savageduck wrote:

>
> >> Pollock is much maligned.
> >> Most of those who ridicule his work have not experienced it, only imagine
> >> that they are capable of similar work without his artistry and intellect
> >> (alcohol not withstanding) they never attain his result. He was unique..

>
> > As we have seen with Mockery's "paintings" even those who profess to like
> > Pollock's work malign it with their misunderstanding of it. Will appears
> > to think the art is in the dribble.

>
> > dmh

>
> well, now-
> what have we here?
> houstman bringing it down to b's cat level
> of altering the posters name.
>
> (a tell tale sign that someone just got owned.)



Nahh, "Savageduck" appears to be a real nym. I checked his profile;
he's been posting under that nym for years.



All times are GMT. The time now is 02:09 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®. Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.