Velocity Reviews

Velocity Reviews (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/index.php)
-   C Programming (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/f42-c-programming.html)
-   -   learning from an existing project's code (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t601405-learning-from-an-existing-projects-code.html)

myheartinamerica 03-24-2008 09:22 PM

learning from an existing project's code
 
Hello,

I've written a number of C programs of relatively small size, and am
looking to make the jump to larger programs. I'd appreciate
recommendations for the following (as I feel that my skill level
doesn't allow me to properly discern good from bad):

1. Open source projects that are organized well and coded well.
2. Books about large-scale C design/programming.

Thanks in advance,
Mick

Chris McDonald 03-24-2008 09:33 PM

Re: learning from an existing project's code
 
myheartinamerica <myheartinamerica@gmail.com> writes:

>Hello,


>I've written a number of C programs of relatively small size, and am
>looking to make the jump to larger programs. I'd appreciate
>recommendations for the following (as I feel that my skill level
>doesn't allow me to properly discern good from bad):


>1. Open source projects that are organized well and coded well.
>2. Books about large-scale C design/programming.



I am about half way through:

Code Reading: The Open Source Perspective
by Diomidis Spinellis
http://www.amazon.com/Code-Reading-P.../dp/0201799405

and have found much of it interesting (though not immediately helpful
for *my* work).

--
Chris.

Morris Dovey 03-24-2008 09:51 PM

Re: learning from an existing project's code
 
myheartinamerica wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I've written a number of C programs of relatively small size, and am
> looking to make the jump to larger programs. I'd appreciate
> recommendations for the following (as I feel that my skill level
> doesn't allow me to properly discern good from bad):
>
> 1. Open source projects that are organized well and coded well.
> 2. Books about large-scale C design/programming.


In the second catagory, I suggest "Advanced Programming in the
UNIX Environment" by W. Richard Stevens. For a beginner it'll
present a healthy level of challenge without being absolutely
overwhelming. As the name says, it's Unix oriented - but that's
not a bad direction to follow for large-scale topics.

--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
DeSoto, Iowa USA
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/

user923005 03-25-2008 12:28 AM

Re: learning from an existing project's code
 
On Mar 24, 2:22*pm, myheartinamerica <myheartinamer...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I've written a number of C programs of relatively small size, and am
> looking to make the jump to larger programs. I'd appreciate
> recommendations for the following (as I feel that my skill level
> doesn't allow me to properly discern good from bad):
>
> 1. Open source projects that are organized well and coded well.


There are some nice projects on SourceForge.
PostgreSQL is an all C database that is fairly well done.

I recommend using doxygen to analyze a source code base for better
understanding.

> 2. Books about large-scale C design/programming.


"The Mythical Man Month" is a must read:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month
This is a good read:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pra...of_Programming

Bill Reid 03-27-2008 12:28 AM

Re: learning from an existing project's code
 

myheartinamerica <myheartinamerica@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:ca093801-b0e6-4267-a614-2550e2128b69@8g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
> Hello,
>
> I've written a number of C programs of relatively small size, and am
> looking to make the jump to larger programs. I'd appreciate
> recommendations for the following (as I feel that my skill level
> doesn't allow me to properly discern good from bad):
>
> 1. Open source projects that are organized well and coded well.


Well, I know two biggies that even if you could quibble about
some of their technical merits, the way the code is presented
on the web is quite spectacular.

First, the mozilla.org code site:

http://lxr.mozilla.org/seamonkey/

That looks like a lot of "C"...and they use a tool that was developed
for Linux to display the code on the web, so you can check out the
Linux source at:

http://lxr.linux.no/

I actually have looked at both occasionally just for "ideas 'n stuff"...

---
William Ernest Reid





All times are GMT. The time now is 01:48 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®. Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.