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Fred Atkinson 02-14-2008 01:49 AM

Mapping A Network Drive On My Home Network From Another Location
 
I have a W2K machine on my home network behind an 800 series
Cisco SOHO router.

I need to be able to connect to that W2K machine from another
location (in this case, from my office) by mapping a network drive to
my office PC (Tools, Map Network Drive from Windows Explorer).

My question is: what static mapping do I have to do to the
router to ensure that the request is forwarded to my PC?



Fred

bthetford 02-17-2008 11:07 PM

Re: Mapping A Network Drive On My Home Network From Another Location
 
On Feb 13, 8:49*pm, Fred Atkinson <fatkin...@mishmash.com> wrote:
> * * * * I have a W2K machine on my home network behind an 800 series
> Cisco SOHO router. *
>
> * * * * I need to be able to connect to that W2K machine from another
> location (in this case, from my office) by mapping a network drive to
> my office PC (Tools, Map Network Drive from Windows Explorer). *
>
> * * * * My question is: what static mapping do I have to do to the
> router to ensure that the request is forwarded to my PC? *
>
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Fred


It doesn't quite work like that.
You need a VPN connection, be it between the routers or between then
computers, first, and then you will have the connectivity you want.

If you have control over the router at work, set up a GRE tunnel
between the two routers and a static route pointing traffic to your
home network to go through the tunnel (be careful you don't make it
too general or you might send other traffic off to no-man's land).
If you don't, then try to set up a PPTP VPN between the two PCs, with
your home PC acting as the "server."

Once you have accomplished either of these, you will be able to access
your home PC via its internal IP address to do whatever you want to do.

Fred Atkinson 02-18-2008 02:29 AM

Re: Mapping A Network Drive On My Home Network From Another Location
 
On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 15:07:10 -0800 (PST), bthetford
<brandon@dodecatec.com> wrote:

>On Feb 13, 8:49*pm, Fred Atkinson <fatkin...@mishmash.com> wrote:
>> * * * * I have a W2K machine on my home network behind an 800 series
>> Cisco SOHO router. *
>>
>> * * * * I need to be able to connect to that W2K machine from another
>> location (in this case, from my office) by mapping a network drive to
>> my office PC (Tools, Map Network Drive from Windows Explorer). *
>>
>> * * * * My question is: what static mapping do I have to do to the
>> router to ensure that the request is forwarded to my PC? *
>>
>> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Fred

>
>It doesn't quite work like that.
>You need a VPN connection, be it between the routers or between then
>computers, first, and then you will have the connectivity you want.
>
>If you have control over the router at work, set up a GRE tunnel
>between the two routers and a static route pointing traffic to your
>home network to go through the tunnel (be careful you don't make it
>too general or you might send other traffic off to no-man's land).
>If you don't, then try to set up a PPTP VPN between the two PCs, with
>your home PC acting as the "server."
>
>Once you have accomplished either of these, you will be able to access
>your home PC via its internal IP address to do whatever you want to do.


VPN I can handle as I have a Cisco 831 router at home and I
can set it up on my office laptop as well. The problem is that I was
never successful in configuring it when I was taking Cisco security
classes in an accelerated fashion. We simply ran out of time.

Does anyone have a link to a well written procedure to
configure it in the Cisco router?

I've looked all over my W2K Professional machine and I can't
find anything to make it function as an NFS server.

A colleague of mine (who is a Microsoft Instructor) suggested
I use remote desktop instead. It would only require forwarding port
3389 from what I've read about it.

However, an inspection of W2K did not reveal the means to
enable it on my home PC. Something I read on the Internet suggested
that W2K Professional did not support it.

So I guess I'll have to find third party clients to do this.

Any suggestions as to where I can find third party software to
support NFS and/or Remote Desktop servers?

Regards,


Fred

Bod43@hotmail.co.uk 02-18-2008 03:07 PM

Re: Mapping A Network Drive On My Home Network From Another Location
 
On 18 Feb, 02:29, Fred Atkinson <fatkin...@mishmash.com> wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 15:07:10 -0800 (PST), bthetford
>
>
>
>
>
> <bran...@dodecatec.com> wrote:
> >On Feb 13, 8:49*pm, Fred Atkinson <fatkin...@mishmash.com> wrote:
> >> * * * * I have a W2K machine on my home network behind an 800 series
> >> Cisco SOHO router. *

>
> >> * * * * I need to be able to connect to that W2K machine from another
> >> location (in this case, from my office) by mapping a network drive to
> >> my office PC (Tools, Map Network Drive from Windows Explorer). *

>
> >> * * * * My question is: what static mapping do I have to do to the
> >> router to ensure that the request is forwarded to my PC? *

>
> >> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Fred

>
> >It doesn't quite work like that.
> >You need a VPN connection, be it between the routers or between then
> >computers, first, and then you will have the connectivity you want.

>
> >If you have control over the router at work, set up a GRE tunnel
> >between the two routers and a static route pointing traffic to your
> >home network to go through the tunnel (be careful you don't make it
> >too general or you might send other traffic off to no-man's land).
> >If you don't, then try to set up a PPTP VPN between the two PCs, with
> >your home PC acting as the "server."

>
> >Once you have accomplished either of these, you will be able to access
> >your home PC via its internal IP address to do whatever you want to do.

>
> * * * * VPN I can handle as I have a Cisco 831 router at home and I
> can set it up on my office laptop as well. *The problem is that I was
> never successful in configuring it when I was taking Cisco security
> classes in an accelerated fashion. *We simply ran out of time. *
>
> * * * * Does anyone have a link to a well written procedure to
> configure it in the Cisco router? *
>
> * * * * I've looked all over my W2K Professional machine and I can't
> find anything to make it function as an NFS server. *
>
> * * * * A colleague of mine (who is a Microsoft Instructor) suggested
> I use remote desktop instead. *It would only require forwarding port
> 3389 from what I've read about it. *
>
> * * * * However, an inspection of W2K did not reveal the means to
> enable it on my home PC. *Something I read on the Internet suggested
> that W2K Professional did not support it. *
>
> * * * * So I guess I'll have to find third party clients to do this. *
>
> * * * * Any suggestions as to where I can find third party software to
> support NFS and/or Remote Desktop servers? *


the thread
"Cisco 1760 router and VPN client Connection Issues "
has a complete configuration for VPN server for a router.

You will need to install the Cisco VPN client on your office PC.

You could in theory:-

Cisco 1760 router and VPN client Connection Issues

ip nat inside source static tcp in.side.ip.add 445 out.side.ip.add
445 extendable

Also add ACLs to the outside interface to only allow your
site to access.

You would want to be pretty sure about your windows security.

Or
ip nat inside source static tcp in.side.ip.add 3389 out.side.ip.add
3389 extendable
which would allow RDP.

this is probably more secure.

You can of course connect local drives to the remote device over RDP.
Just poke around the GUI.









Bod43@hotmail.co.uk 02-18-2008 03:08 PM

Re: Mapping A Network Drive On My Home Network From Another Location
 
On 18 Feb, 02:29, Fred Atkinson <fatkin...@mishmash.com> wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 15:07:10 -0800 (PST), bthetford
>
>
>
>
>
> <bran...@dodecatec.com> wrote:
> >On Feb 13, 8:49*pm, Fred Atkinson <fatkin...@mishmash.com> wrote:
> >> * * * * I have a W2K machine on my home network behind an 800 series
> >> Cisco SOHO router. *

>
> >> * * * * I need to be able to connect to that W2K machine from another
> >> location (in this case, from my office) by mapping a network drive to
> >> my office PC (Tools, Map Network Drive from Windows Explorer). *

>
> >> * * * * My question is: what static mapping do I have to do to the
> >> router to ensure that the request is forwarded to my PC? *

>
> >> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Fred

>
> >It doesn't quite work like that.
> >You need a VPN connection, be it between the routers or between then
> >computers, first, and then you will have the connectivity you want.

>
> >If you have control over the router at work, set up a GRE tunnel
> >between the two routers and a static route pointing traffic to your
> >home network to go through the tunnel (be careful you don't make it
> >too general or you might send other traffic off to no-man's land).
> >If you don't, then try to set up a PPTP VPN between the two PCs, with
> >your home PC acting as the "server."

>
> >Once you have accomplished either of these, you will be able to access
> >your home PC via its internal IP address to do whatever you want to do.

>
> * * * * VPN I can handle as I have a Cisco 831 router at home and I
> can set it up on my office laptop as well. *The problem is that I was
> never successful in configuring it when I was taking Cisco security
> classes in an accelerated fashion. *We simply ran out of time. *
>
> * * * * Does anyone have a link to a well written procedure to
> configure it in the Cisco router? *
>
> * * * * I've looked all over my W2K Professional machine and I can't
> find anything to make it function as an NFS server. *
>
> * * * * A colleague of mine (who is a Microsoft Instructor) suggested
> I use remote desktop instead. *It would only require forwarding port
> 3389 from what I've read about it. *
>
> * * * * However, an inspection of W2K did not reveal the means to
> enable it on my home PC. *Something I read on the Internet suggested
> that W2K Professional did not support it. *



W2K professional DOES do RDP server.



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