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ZL409 09-10-2006 08:58 PM

Best Linux for beginner Also
 
I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
beginner

Many thanks
Kevin

Gordon 09-11-2006 05:55 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 08:58:21 +1200, ZL409 wrote:

> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
> beginner


I'll throw in the option of PCLinuxOS. It is a live CD which installs to
HD if required. Same as Ubuntu etc. PCLinux OS is not at version 1 but
0.93.

PCLinuxOS is an offshoot of Mandriva. Mandriva has lost is way somewhat,
still 2007 version is nearly hear.

Look, just grab a few live CDs and try them out. The Linux distros have
improved by leaps and bounds. The installation usually just works, and all
admin can be done by point and click.

It is not MS Windows, so let this idea go before you start.

Adam 09-11-2006 05:58 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
ZL409 wrote:

> I too would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
> beginner


Copied from an exchange below, but for these reasons;

- a good Newsgroup for your distro is a real advantage. A bad one is no fun
at all.

- have a poke around with a Live CD. Take a look at the vast range of
software that will run from it. Try some Linux-ey things out with it. Get
some internet references for further reading. Find Distrowatch.

- why not phase over from Windows to a Linux slowly. Gradually get used to
Linux then make the switch. Usually, there is specific software you require
for specific purposes, and until this is completely replaced by the Linux
stuff, (sometimes determined by the distro), then you will require the use
of both. A second drive with one Linux or another or both there, is just a
plain good idea, (although juggling the bootup into Windows, LinuxDistro1,
LinuxDistro2, WILL take some getting used to).


Here's the copy from below;


The latest Knoppix really is Very good, for trying out a few things on a
live CD. Because lots of software is there, and it runs straight off.

For the future, you should consider adding a separate HDD for the Linux of
your choice, and during the Linux install allow the dual-boot option to be
configured. Keep a copy of the original boot sector on a floppy just in
case.

If the 2nd HDD is of any reasonable size, then you can try alternative Linux
distros and boot between them until you all decide which.

Windows seems to have the best sound editing software (Audition,
Soundforge), but Linux is catching up fast (Audacity is usable and being
actively developed). Linux of course has the safest mail and internet
environment.

The 2nd (separate) HDD for solely Linux, with a FAT32 common windows
interchange partition, seems the best and most flexible solution, allowing
the best of all possible worlds.

I'll just mention considering Mandriva, who seem to have a friendly and
helpful newsgroup and as an OS seems user friendly.



wogers nemesis 09-11-2006 06:44 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 08:58:21 +1200, ZL409 wrote:

> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
> beginner
>
> Many thanks
> Kevin


ubuntu seems to keep the newbies happy.......

Jamie Kahn Genet 09-11-2006 07:24 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
ZL409 <krcosgrove@gmail.com> wrote:

> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
> beginner
>
> Many thanks
> Kevin


Ubuntu. So easy to try out with the Live/Install CD, easy to install,
easy to setup, it comes with almost every app the average user needs,
and is regularly updated with good support available. They'll even post
free Live/Install CDs to you.

Regards,
Jamie Kahn Genet
--
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

steve 09-11-2006 10:51 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
ZL409 wrote:
> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
> beginner
>
> Many thanks
> Kevin


Xandros 4.0 would be an excellent choice.

My 71yo mother uses it.....


Steve 09-11-2006 06:18 PM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 08:58:21 +1200, ZL409 wrote:

> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
> beginner
>
> Many thanks
> Kevin


Hopefully the one your mate is going to help you learn. There's b*g all
difference between them all.


BrianM 09-11-2006 11:21 PM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 20:51:06 +1000, steve wrote:

> ZL409 wrote:
>> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
>> beginner
>>
>> Many thanks
>> Kevin

>
> Xandros 4.0 would be an excellent choice.
>
> My 71yo mother uses it.....


Good thing about Xandros is you can install it over the top of Windows and it will
give you the choice of keeping the Fat32 partition, and add the Windows startup
option to the boot loader, giving you a dual boot system.

cheers
--
BrianM

steve 09-12-2006 03:19 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
BrianM wrote:

> On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 20:51:06 +1000, steve wrote:
>
>> ZL409 wrote:
>>> I to would appreciate comments on what is the best linux distro for a
>>> beginner
>>>
>>> Many thanks
>>> Kevin

>>
>> Xandros 4.0 would be an excellent choice.
>>
>> My 71yo mother uses it.....

>
> Good thing about Xandros is you can install it over the top of Windows and
> it will
> give you the choice of keeping the Fat32 partition, and add the Windows
> startup option to the boot loader, giving you a dual boot system.
>
> cheers


Most of the mainstream Linux distros do that.

It's Windows that goes into denial when it sees a Linux (or any other)
system installed.






Bruce Sinclair 09-12-2006 04:56 AM

Re: Best Linux for beginner Also
 
In article <45062741@news.orcon.net.nz>, steve <steve@whodathotit.org> wrote:
(snip)
>> Good thing about Xandros is you can install it over the top of Windows and
>> it will
>> give you the choice of keeping the Fat32 partition, and add the Windows
>> startup option to the boot loader, giving you a dual boot system.


>Most of the mainstream Linux distros do that.


Does anyone know if it will it do likewise with an aging RH 9 system ? ie
will it install side by side ... or will it want to use the same space for
stuff and break the working RH system ?

Thanks




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