Velocity Reviews

Velocity Reviews (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/index.php)
-   NZ Computing (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/f47-nz-computing.html)
-   -   NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live" (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t577152-nz-has-such-poor-broadband-microsoft-is-worried-they-cannot-offer-live.html)

news.xtra.co.nz 11-27-2005 07:50 PM

NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
Microsofts future "Live" offerings apparently rely on decent broadband
connections. MS are so worried about the state of NZ broadband that even
they are whining to the govt now.

This statement is from the govt....

Not to have fast, affordable, ubiquitous broadband in the 21st century is
commercial "suicide", he told the conference in a keynote address

Those govt ****ers have been supporting telecom for the last 6 years so they
should stop spouting garbage and take action ASAP.


http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/...2570C400141CDE

Microsoft appears to be adding to the impetus for New Zealand to increase
uptake of broadband, with a discreet word in communications minister David
Cunliffe's ear.

"Microsoft has been in to me and put me on notice as minister that action
needs to be taken on broadband," Cunliffe told Computerworld at a meeting
before the Digital Cities and Regional Networks conference in Wellington.
The company has an eye to the local viability of its "Live" plan to provide
software as a service and efficient infrastructure is critical to this
trend, he says.

Increasingly online industry and commerce and a rising generation expecting
fast information service will provide a pincer movement awakening the rest
of New Zealand's population to the potential of broadband, Cunliffe says.
The move towards online provision of applications services is just one more
element in the growing case for higher bandwidth.

Microsoft declines to comment "at present" on any conversation it may have
had with Cunliffe on the subject of communications infrastructure.

Gerrit Bahlmann, treasurer of the Next Generation Internet consortium,
points to the emergence of Google Earth as an example of broadband value for
the general population. Visiting another city, he was able to pull up aerial
views and choose a hotel based on its proximity to the places he planned to
visit, he says. "Imagine how much more valuable that would be in real time."

Pressed on the ordinary Kiwi's recognition of a need for broadband service,
Cunliffe cited the potential for telework and avoidance of traffic
congestion in large cities. There are pleasant locations in New Zealand
which knowledge workers and creative people would love to have as a base, as
long as they could conduct national and international business through a
high-capacity link, he says. "Name me a country that stands to benefit more
from the abolition of distance."

However, neither Cunliffe nor former Wellington mayor Fran Wilde will
venture a view on why the Close2:Kapiti trial, aimed at encouraging people
living in the Kapiti area to avoid the commute into Wellington, met with
such a disappointing response that it was not followed up.

Teleworking does raise objections on organisational grounds, from managers
concerned that teleworkers are outside immediate supervision, says Wilde,
but these difficulties "are only in the managers' minds". If teleworkers did
not produce their quota of work, this would soon be noticed, she says.

Promoting attitudinal changes of that sort alongside development of the
infrastructure "is what the Digital Strategy's all about", says Cunliffe.

Not to have fast, affordable, ubiquitous broadband in the 21st century is
commercial "suicide", he told the conference in a keynote address. He also
agreed with a speaker from the floor, John Heard, one of the founders of
CityLink, that New Zealand telcos are risk-averse with investment and prefer
to pay large dividends to their shareholders. "You're right," Cunliffe says.
"They should forget about dividends and invest in growth."



Matthew Poole 11-28-2005 12:51 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 09:50:32 +1300, someone purporting to be
news.xtra.co.nz didst scrawl:

*SNIP*
> Those govt ****ers have been supporting telecom for the last 6 years so
> they should stop spouting garbage and take action ASAP.
>

*SNIP*

I think you'll find it's 15 years. And we shall see what happens when
Parliament resumes in February, since they will then have the figures on
how dismally Telecon failed to live up to their side of the deal with
regards to the local loop not being unbundled.
Hopefully Cunliffe will have a little more success with Cabinet than Swain
did.

--
Matthew Poole
"Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."


thing2 11-28-2005 02:04 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer"Live"
 
news.xtra.co.nz wrote:
> Microsofts future "Live" offerings apparently rely on decent broadband
> connections. MS are so worried about the state of NZ broadband that even
> they are whining to the govt now.
>
> This statement is from the govt....
>
> Not to have fast, affordable, ubiquitous broadband in the 21st century is
> commercial "suicide", he told the conference in a keynote address
>
> Those govt ****ers have been supporting telecom for the last 6 years so they
> should stop spouting garbage and take action ASAP.
>
>
> http://computerworld.co.nz/news.nsf/...2570C400141CDE
>
> Microsoft appears to be adding to the impetus for New Zealand to increase
> uptake of broadband, with a discreet word in communications minister David
> Cunliffe's ear.
>
> "Microsoft has been in to me and put me on notice as minister that action
> needs to be taken on broadband," Cunliffe told Computerworld at a meeting
> before the Digital Cities and Regional Networks conference in Wellington.
> The company has an eye to the local viability of its "Live" plan to provide
> software as a service and efficient infrastructure is critical to this
> trend, he says.
>
> Increasingly online industry and commerce and a rising generation expecting
> fast information service will provide a pincer movement awakening the rest
> of New Zealand's population to the potential of broadband, Cunliffe says.
> The move towards online provision of applications services is just one more
> element in the growing case for higher bandwidth.
>
> Microsoft declines to comment "at present" on any conversation it may have
> had with Cunliffe on the subject of communications infrastructure.
>
> Gerrit Bahlmann, treasurer of the Next Generation Internet consortium,
> points to the emergence of Google Earth as an example of broadband value for
> the general population. Visiting another city, he was able to pull up aerial
> views and choose a hotel based on its proximity to the places he planned to
> visit, he says. "Imagine how much more valuable that would be in real time."
>
> Pressed on the ordinary Kiwi's recognition of a need for broadband service,
> Cunliffe cited the potential for telework and avoidance of traffic
> congestion in large cities. There are pleasant locations in New Zealand
> which knowledge workers and creative people would love to have as a base, as
> long as they could conduct national and international business through a
> high-capacity link, he says. "Name me a country that stands to benefit more
> from the abolition of distance."
>
> However, neither Cunliffe nor former Wellington mayor Fran Wilde will
> venture a view on why the Close2:Kapiti trial, aimed at encouraging people
> living in the Kapiti area to avoid the commute into Wellington, met with
> such a disappointing response that it was not followed up.
>
> Teleworking does raise objections on organisational grounds, from managers
> concerned that teleworkers are outside immediate supervision, says Wilde,
> but these difficulties "are only in the managers' minds". If teleworkers did
> not produce their quota of work, this would soon be noticed, she says.
>
> Promoting attitudinal changes of that sort alongside development of the
> infrastructure "is what the Digital Strategy's all about", says Cunliffe.
>
> Not to have fast, affordable, ubiquitous broadband in the 21st century is
> commercial "suicide", he told the conference in a keynote address. He also
> agreed with a speaker from the floor, John Heard, one of the founders of
> CityLink, that New Zealand telcos are risk-averse with investment and prefer
> to pay large dividends to their shareholders. "You're right," Cunliffe says.
> "They should forget about dividends and invest in growth."
>
>



Interesting that MS was getting into bed with Xtra and telecom at one
stage....now it seems they have had a wee falling out.......

regards

Thing



Mr Undeniably Sluttish 11-28-2005 07:41 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 08:50:32 +1300, news.xtra.co.nz wrote:

> There are pleasant locations in New Zealand
> which knowledge workers and creative people would love to have as a base, as
> long as they could conduct national and international business through a
> high-capacity link, he says


Notice that he did not say "high speed" or "full speed". Most users of
ADSL services already connect through "high-capacity" links - it's just
that those links are not used to anything like full capacity, or full
speed.

The speeds currently offered at (still higher than) reasonably realistic
prices are only "high speed" when considered in comparison with the
slowness of dialup modems; and a P2P connection can only function up to
the maximum speed of the uplink - not at the speed of the downlink.

If a word from Micro$oft can have such an impact on Cunliffe, then why
can't a word from the Free Software Foundation have a similar impact?


Undeniably Sluttish

--
Free software on every PC on every desk.


Mr Undeniably Sluttish 11-28-2005 08:05 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 15:04:11 +1300, thing2 wrote:

> Interesting that MS was getting into bed with Xtra and telecom at one
> stage....now it seems they have had a wee falling out.......


Possibly because Telecon/Xtra considered that it would make more money
from extorting a small number of "broadband" users rather than providing
genuine full speed broadband to everybody at affordable prices; whereas
Micro$oft was wanting Telecon.Xtra to provide broadband at near cost so
that Micro$oft could make most of the profit...... possibly.


Undeniably Sluttish

--
"I'd hate to be furniture in Ballmer's office."


Brendan 11-28-2005 01:00 PM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 08:50:32 +1300, news.xtra.co.nz wrote:

> Those govt ****ers have been supporting telecom for the last 6 years so they
> should stop spouting garbage and take action ASAP.


6 years ?!? **** off! National did at least *9* years of Telecom
cock-sucking before the current mob took over.

All the right-wing fascists in these groups FAILED to comment negatively on
THAT little fact all during...

Amazing thing that: the same wankers who NOW whine and bitch about Labour
not doing this, not fixing that, were fully supporting National previously
with their silence on the same issues.

Wank wank... It'd have to be the number ONE reason I consider most
right-wing supporters to be either mentally retarded or psychopathically
hypocritical...

--

.... Brendan

#365072 +(4643)- [X]

<xxxGirlygirlxxx> Thank you for listening to me.
<xxxGirlygirlxxx> You know your a really good listener.
<xxxGirlygirlxxx> Sweety please say something.
<Sandaedar> Ok I'm back.


Note: All my comments are copyright 29/11/2005 12:39:58 a.m. and are opinion only where not otherwise stated and always "to the best of my recollection". www.computerman.orcon.net.nz.

Richard 11-28-2005 11:25 PM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer"Live"
 
Brendan wrote:
> On Mon, 28 Nov 2005 08:50:32 +1300, news.xtra.co.nz wrote:
>
>
>>Those govt ****ers have been supporting telecom for the last 6 years so they
>>should stop spouting garbage and take action ASAP.

>
>
> 6 years ?!? **** off! National did at least *9* years of Telecom
> cock-sucking before the current mob took over.
>
> All the right-wing fascists in these groups FAILED to comment negatively on
> THAT little fact all during...
>
> Amazing thing that: the same wankers who NOW whine and bitch about Labour
> not doing this, not fixing that, were fully supporting National previously
> with their silence on the same issues.
>
> Wank wank... It'd have to be the number ONE reason I consider most
> right-wing supporters to be either mentally retarded or psychopathically
> hypocritical...


Back then it wasnt clear that there would even be ADSL initially, and then there
were not too many complaints about it. its only in the last 3-4 years that
people have really started to get shitty about it and want to see something
done. I dont think either party would have handled things that differently.

Were labour bitching about it last time when Maurice was incharge of telecomm's?
I cant recall that far back.

Peter 11-29-2005 02:04 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
news.xtra.co.nz wrote:

> Microsofts future "Live" offerings apparently rely on decent broadband
> connections. MS are so worried about the state of NZ broadband that even
> they are whining to the govt now.
>


Who cares what Microsoft think, and why should microsoft have privileged
access to politicians, senior managers, etc compared with access available
to mere mortals and employees.


~misfit~ 11-29-2005 09:18 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
Peter wrote:
> news.xtra.co.nz wrote:
>
>> Microsofts future "Live" offerings apparently rely on decent
>> broadband connections. MS are so worried about the state of NZ
>> broadband that even they are whining to the govt now.
>>

>
> Who cares what Microsoft think, and why should microsoft have
> privileged access to politicians, senior managers, etc compared with
> access available to mere mortals and employees.


Who gives a ****? If they can get Telecom (and hence other ISPs) to offer
better broadband, I'll actually buy more MS products to show my
appreciation. All my mice are MS opticals and I like them.
--
~misfit~



MarkH 11-29-2005 11:06 AM

Re: NZ has such poor broadband Microsoft is worried they cannot offer "Live"
 
"~misfit~" <misfit61nz@wahoo.co.nz> wrote in
news:438c1dbd@news.orcon.net.nz:

> Peter wrote:
>> news.xtra.co.nz wrote:
>>
>>> Microsofts future "Live" offerings apparently rely on decent
>>> broadband connections. MS are so worried about the state of NZ
>>> broadband that even they are whining to the govt now.
>>>

>>
>> Who cares what Microsoft think, and why should microsoft have
>> privileged access to politicians, senior managers, etc compared with
>> access available to mere mortals and employees.

>
> Who gives a ****? If they can get Telecom (and hence other ISPs) to
> offer better broadband, I'll actually buy more MS products to show my
> appreciation. All my mice are MS opticals and I like them.


I agree, MS are even helping the Linux community by pushing for better
broadband (I use a reasonable amount of bandwidth downloading Linux ISOs).

But MS optical mice are not as good as the Logitech ones.


--
Mark Heyes (New Zealand)
See my pics at www.gigatech.co.nz (last updated 5-September-05)
"The person on the other side was a young woman. Very obviously a
young woman. There was no possible way she could have been mistaken
for a young man in any language, especially Braille."
Maskerade


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:41 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®. Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.