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bpascal123@googlemail.com 11-08-2007 09:12 AM

Bios : one question and one problem
 
Hi,

I have one question about the bios. If a password is set on start up
on a pentium computer, can one get rid of the password if the computer
is turned off, the main battery is taken away and the bios little
battery as well?

I believe the answer is answer is no. In the other case it wouldn't
make sense. Just to make sure.

Now I have a problem related to the same question:

I have an IBM T42 and not too long ago, I decided to set a bios start
up password. I remember the password... and I can use the computer.
But recently, I was about to change the internal hd and the seller
wanted to check something in the bios and at that point, the password
had to be removed to access what he wanted...infos about the current
hd inside the computer I think.

How can we remove that IBM T42 password? Menus to do so in the bios
are frozen.

Thanks if you know about it and help me with that.

Päscal


jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk 11-11-2007 10:34 AM

Re: Bios : one question and one problem
 
On Nov 8, 9:12 am, bpascal...@googlemail.com wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have one question about the bios. If a password is set on start up
> on a pentium computer, can one get rid of the password if the computer
> is turned off, the main battery is taken away and the bios little
> battery as well?
>
> I believe the answer is answer is no. In the other case it wouldn't
> make sense. Just to make sure.
>
> Now I have a problem related to the same question:
>
> I have an IBM T42 and not too long ago, I decided to set a bios start
> up password. I remember the password... and I can use the computer.
> But recently, I was about to change the internal hd and the seller
> wanted to check something in the bios and at that point, the password
> had to be removed to access what he wanted...infos about the current
> hd inside the computer I think.
>
> How can we remove that IBM T42 password? Menus to do so in the bios
> are frozen.
>
> Thanks if you know about it and help me with that.
>
> Päscal


a program called killcmos will do it.

It is safe. Not scary like it sounds. It just resets the BIOS
settings.




Brian 12-01-2007 12:12 AM

Re: Bios : one question and one problem
 
Thee is also a jumper on the motherboard that resets the CMOS. it's usually
blue... switch to pin 2-3 start wait for beep, shutdown, switch back to pin
1-2 restart, BIOS is reset to default


<jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:1194777294.986040.322100@v2g2000hsf.googlegro ups.com...
On Nov 8, 9:12 am, bpascal...@googlemail.com wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have one question about the bios. If a password is set on start up
> on a pentium computer, can one get rid of the password if the computer
> is turned off, the main battery is taken away and the bios little
> battery as well?
>
> I believe the answer is answer is no. In the other case it wouldn't
> make sense. Just to make sure.
>
> Now I have a problem related to the same question:
>
> I have an IBM T42 and not too long ago, I decided to set a bios start
> up password. I remember the password... and I can use the computer.
> But recently, I was about to change the internal hd and the seller
> wanted to check something in the bios and at that point, the password
> had to be removed to access what he wanted...infos about the current
> hd inside the computer I think.
>
> How can we remove that IBM T42 password? Menus to do so in the bios
> are frozen.
>
> Thanks if you know about it and help me with that.
>
> Päscal


a program called killcmos will do it.

It is safe. Not scary like it sounds. It just resets the BIOS
settings.





jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk 12-01-2007 05:10 PM

Re: Bios : one question and one problem
 
On Dec 1, 12:12 am, "Brian" <bds1compu...@sio.midco.net> wrote:
> Thee is also a jumper on the motherboard that resets the CMOS. it's usually
> blue... switch to pin 2-3 start wait for beep, shutdown, switch back to pin
> 1-2 restart, BIOS is reset to default
>



easier than that is removing the battery then putting it back.

and easier than that is killcmos.

the classic reason for replacing the battery is because it needs
changing, a symptom being the clock(in the BIOS or I think windows)
going slow / behind) Though now that windows clock can be synced,
maybe many people would no longer notice.

If they leave it long enough would their computer not start up? At
which point, how would they know it is the CMOS battery?
I guess if that is the problem , you can still get to the BIOS and
thus see the clock. Even if the battery is completely flat. Just
guessing. Anybody know?


Brian 12-05-2007 01:12 AM

Re: Bios : one question and one problem
 
not all BIOS can be reset to default by removing the battery, depends on the
type of CMOS chip used
<jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:31f18404-2bd7-47e8-9469-25fd82e477e1@n20g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
On Dec 1, 12:12 am, "Brian" <bds1compu...@sio.midco.net> wrote:
> Thee is also a jumper on the motherboard that resets the CMOS. it's
> usually
> blue... switch to pin 2-3 start wait for beep, shutdown, switch back to
> pin
> 1-2 restart, BIOS is reset to default
>



easier than that is removing the battery then putting it back.

and easier than that is killcmos.

the classic reason for replacing the battery is because it needs
changing, a symptom being the clock(in the BIOS or I think windows)
going slow / behind) Though now that windows clock can be synced,
maybe many people would no longer notice.

If they leave it long enough would their computer not start up? At
which point, how would they know it is the CMOS battery?
I guess if that is the problem , you can still get to the BIOS and
thus see the clock. Even if the battery is completely flat. Just
guessing. Anybody know?



jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk 12-05-2007 08:22 AM

Re: Bios : one question and one problem
 
On Dec 5, 1:12 am, "Brian" <bds1compu...@sio.midco.net> wrote:
> not all BIOS can be reset to default by removing the battery, depends on the
> type of CMOS chip used


with those chips, is there is a battery? if so what does it do?

call me old fashioned, but my understanding was/ has been that
if memory is writable and permanent, there is no point for a battery,
(but no memory is or was like that). Else, it needs a battery and
would get wiped or new settings wiped, and reset back to default
without one. The battery fuels the CMOS memory so it can store its
BIOS settings continuously whether the computer is on or off.

Given that the crucial BIOS functions are done by Autodetect anyway,
it would not seem so terrible to be reset to default, the computer
would still start (hopefully with USB enabled!) . But clock would be
wrong (like maybe 12AM 1994) but who cares about that! Unfortunately,
I think the computer won`t start, perhaps it won`t retain the settings
it autodetected. Though in theory, that could be done with RAM. no
battery needed.



Paul 12-05-2007 08:52 AM

Re: Bios : one question and one problem
 
jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
> On Dec 5, 1:12 am, "Brian" <bds1compu...@sio.midco.net> wrote:
>> not all BIOS can be reset to default by removing the battery, depends on the
>> type of CMOS chip used

>
> with those chips, is there is a battery? if so what does it do?
>
> call me old fashioned, but my understanding was/ has been that
> if memory is writable and permanent, there is no point for a battery,
> (but no memory is or was like that). Else, it needs a battery and
> would get wiped or new settings wiped, and reset back to default
> without one. The battery fuels the CMOS memory so it can store its
> BIOS settings continuously whether the computer is on or off.
>
> Given that the crucial BIOS functions are done by Autodetect anyway,
> it would not seem so terrible to be reset to default, the computer
> would still start (hopefully with USB enabled!) . But clock would be
> wrong (like maybe 12AM 1994) but who cares about that! Unfortunately,
> I think the computer won`t start, perhaps it won`t retain the settings
> it autodetected. Though in theory, that could be done with RAM. no
> battery needed.
>


This is an example from my motherboard. The chipset is 875P and ICH5R
Southbridge. The following passage is from the ICH5/ICH5R datasheet
25251601.pdf from Intel.

"RTC

The ICH5 contains a Motorola MC146818A-compatible real-time clock
with 256 bytes of battery backed RAM. The real-time clock performs
two key functions: keeping track of the time of day and storing system
data, even when the system is powered down. The RTC operates on a
32.768 KHz crystal and a separate 3 V lithium battery.

The RTC also supports two lockable memory ranges. By setting bits in
the configuration space, two 8-byte ranges can be locked to read and
write accesses. This prevents unauthorized reading of passwords or
other system security information.

The RTC also supports a date alarm that allows for scheduling a wake
up event up to 30 days in advance, rather than just 24 hours in advance."

So removing all power, including the battery, will reset that one.

But the CMOS isn't the only place that info can be stored. The BIOS
also has the ability to update blocks in the BIOS flash chip itself.
The DMI/ESCD is an example of that. That is one reason, if you flash a
new BIOS, reboot the computer once, and then make an archival copy of
the contents of the BIOS chip, it won't match the original file which
was flashed. That is because the DMI/ESCD area has been updated.

Paul


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