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laura 08-04-2007 06:48 AM

test if integer
 

Hi,

I have a variable of type double.
I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
test that ?

I also have a default precision for doing this operation.

Many thanks,
Laura


pete 08-04-2007 07:56 AM

Re: test if integer
 
laura wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> I have a variable of type double.
> I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
> test that ?
>
> I also have a default precision for doing this operation.


#include <math.h>

if (fmod(variable, 1) == 0) {/* variable is an integer */}

--
pete

Martin Ambuhl 08-04-2007 08:58 AM

Re: test if integer
 
laura wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have a variable of type double.
> I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
> test that ?
>
> I also have a default precision for doing this operation.


In addition to the following kind of test, think about whether the
ceil() or floor() functions might provide you a test. Consider whether
using them leads to a more reliable test or a more efficient one.

The newer functions round(), trunc(), rint, and nearbyint() might also
provide you with suitable tests. The rint() might be what you want,
since it raises the "inexact" floating point exception if the argument
is not an integer. You might find that learning how to handle floating
point exceptions is not what you want to be doing now, though. If you
do, check your text for a discussion of the <fenv.h> header. If your
implementation does not provide such a header, then don't bother.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
int i;
double base = 4080., testv, intpart, fraction;
for (i = 2; i <= 20; i++) {
testv = base / i;
printf("Testing %g: ", testv);
fraction = modf(testv, &intpart);
if (fraction) {
printf("fractional part = %g\n"
" so probably not an integer.\n"
"integer part = %g.\n\n", fraction, intpart);
}
else {
printf("fractional part test == 0,\n" " so an integer.\n"
"integer part = %g.\n\n", intpart);
}
}
return 0;
}

Testing 2040: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 2040.

Testing 1360: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 1360.

Testing 1020: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 1020.

Testing 816: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 816.

Testing 680: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 680.

Testing 582.857: fractional part = 0.857143
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 582.

Testing 510: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 510.

Testing 453.333: fractional part = 0.333333
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 453.

Testing 408: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 408.

Testing 370.909: fractional part = 0.909091
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 370.

Testing 340: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 340.

Testing 313.846: fractional part = 0.846154
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 313.

Testing 291.429: fractional part = 0.428571
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 291.

Testing 272: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 272.

Testing 255: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 255.

Testing 240: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 240.

Testing 226.667: fractional part = 0.666667
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 226.

Testing 214.737: fractional part = 0.736842
so probably not an integer.
integer part = 214.

Testing 204: fractional part test == 0,
so an integer.
integer part = 204.


Walter Roberson 08-04-2007 06:18 PM

Re: test if integer
 
In article <1186210139.790525.161160@l70g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
laura <laura.brandusan@gmail.com> wrote:
>I have a variable of type double.
>I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
>test that ?


Other posters have given some good ideas.

You do need to be careful, though: if you do fmod(value,1.0) can you be
sure that there will not be any round-off in the last unit?

You also have a problem of resolution: if the input value is (say)
1263330816481424704.3432 then with a IEEE 754 double, this
would be stored as 1.2633308164814246e+18 which has been unable
to store the last 104.3432 or so; fmod(1.2633308164814246e+18,1.0)
would be 0 even though the input was not an integer as far as
the human was concerned.
--
Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new? It hath
been already of old time, which was before us. -- Ecclesiastes

Army1987 08-05-2007 11:31 AM

Re: test if integer
 
On Sat, 04 Aug 2007 18:18:35 +0000, Walter Roberson wrote:

> In article <1186210139.790525.161160@l70g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
> laura <laura.brandusan@gmail.com> wrote:
>>I have a variable of type double.
>>I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
>>test that ?

>
> Other posters have given some good ideas.
>
> You do need to be careful, though: if you do fmod(value,1.0) can you be
> sure that there will not be any round-off in the last unit?
>
> You also have a problem of resolution: if the input value is (say)
> 1263330816481424704.3432 then with a IEEE 754 double, this
> would be stored as 1.2633308164814246e+18 which has been unable
> to store the last 104.3432 or so; fmod(1.2633308164814246e+18,1.0)
> would be 0 even though the input was not an integer as far as
> the human was concerned.

What? She asked how to know "if there is an integer number
store[d] there". She did not ask to know whether it is an integer
because of rounding, considering there is no way a C program can
determine that.

--
Army1987 (Replace "NOSPAM" with "email")
"Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained
by stupidity." -- R. J. Hanlon (?)


Walter Roberson 08-05-2007 07:51 PM

Re: test if integer
 
In article <pan.2007.08.05.11.31.53.586197@NOSPAM.it>,
Army1987 <army1987@NOSPAM.it> wrote:
>On Sat, 04 Aug 2007 18:18:35 +0000, Walter Roberson wrote:


>> In article <1186210139.790525.161160@l70g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
>> laura <laura.brandusan@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>I have a variable of type double.
>>>I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
>>>test that ?


>> You also have a problem of resolution: if the input value is (say)
>> 1263330816481424704.3432 then with a IEEE 754 double, this
>> would be stored as 1.2633308164814246e+18 which has been unable
>> to store the last 104.3432 or so;


>What? She asked how to know "if there is an integer number
>store[d] there". She did not ask to know whether it is an integer
>because of rounding, considering there is no way a C program can
>determine that.


But she asked whether there is an integer "number" stored there,
not an integer "value". "number" is the pure concept, with "double"
being an approximation. When one examines the approximation, one cannot
be sure that the original -number- was an integer or not.
--
Programming is what happens while you're busy making other plans.

Army1987 08-06-2007 09:51 AM

Re: test if integer
 
On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 19:51:55 +0000, Walter Roberson wrote:

> In article <pan.2007.08.05.11.31.53.586197@NOSPAM.it>,
> Army1987 <army1987@NOSPAM.it> wrote:
>>On Sat, 04 Aug 2007 18:18:35 +0000, Walter Roberson wrote:

>
>>> In article <1186210139.790525.161160@l70g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
>>> laura <laura.brandusan@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>I have a variable of type double.
>>>>I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
>>>>test that ?

>
>>> You also have a problem of resolution: if the input value is (say)
>>> 1263330816481424704.3432 then with a IEEE 754 double, this
>>> would be stored as 1.2633308164814246e+18 which has been unable
>>> to store the last 104.3432 or so;

>
>>What? She asked how to know "if there is an integer number
>>store[d] there". She did not ask to know whether it is an integer
>>because of rounding, considering there is no way a C program can
>>determine that.

>
> But she asked whether there is an integer "number" stored there,
> not an integer "value". "number" is the pure concept, with "double"
> being an approximation. When one examines the approximation, one cannot
> be sure that the original -number- was an integer or not.

If I write
double a;
a = 1.000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 00000000001;
supposing DBL_EPSILON is large enough, that number gets rounded
*before* being stored in a. The number stored in a is 1.
If she meant "How do I know whether the number 'intended to' be
stored is integer", well, short of having the program read its own
source for constants, tricky workarounds for strtod, and
calculations with infinite precision for other things such as
(1.0 / 3.0) * 3.0, how the hell is she supposed to do that?

--
Army1987 (Replace "NOSPAM" with "email")
"Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained
by stupidity." -- R. J. Hanlon (?)


Walter Roberson 08-06-2007 06:59 PM

Re: test if integer
 
In article <pan.2007.08.06.09.51.06.461111@NOSPAM.it>,
Army1987 <army1987@NOSPAM.it> wrote:
>On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 19:51:55 +0000, Walter Roberson wrote:
>
>> In article <pan.2007.08.05.11.31.53.586197@NOSPAM.it>,
>> Army1987 <army1987@NOSPAM.it> wrote:
>>>On Sat, 04 Aug 2007 18:18:35 +0000, Walter Roberson wrote:


>>>> In article <1186210139.790525.161160@l70g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
>>>> laura <laura.brandusan@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>I have a variable of type double.
>>>>>I need to know if there is an integer number store there. How can I
>>>>>test that ?


>>>> You also have a problem of resolution: if the input value is (say)
>>>> 1263330816481424704.3432 then with a IEEE 754 double, this
>>>> would be stored as 1.2633308164814246e+18 which has been unable
>>>> to store the last 104.3432 or so;


>If she meant "How do I know whether the number 'intended to' be
>stored is integer", well, short of having the program read its own
>source for constants, tricky workarounds for strtod, and
>calculations with infinite precision for other things such as
>(1.0 / 3.0) * 3.0, how the hell is she supposed to do that?


Exactly. She can't. There's the problem of resolution; infinite
resolution, just as you point out.

When people ask questions here, what they ask to do isn't always
possible to do. But often, what they ask to do isn't actually
what they want to do; sometimes it is more feasible and sometimes
it is even less feasible; we can but point out the issues and hope
that helps.
--
"No one has the right to destroy another person's belief by
demanding empirical evidence." -- Ann Landers


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