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dnuckle 01-19-2007 07:02 PM

WLAN Planning
 
I was wondering if there is a general rule for how many access points
to use per number of users that will be on a network. I am looking at
an area that can easily be covered by 1 to 2 access points. My concern
is that 2 access points won't handle the necessary bandwidth for up to
150 users. I know even on the router side with that many users I
likely will get a lot of latency, especially during peak traffic times.
I was looking at the 1130 a/b/g access points. Some feedback would be
greatly appreciated.

David


Walter Roberson 01-19-2007 07:40 PM

Re: WLAN Planning
 
In article <1169233329.535695.238490@v45g2000cwv.googlegroups .com>,
dnuckle <david.nuckles@hulanetworks.com> wrote:
>I was wondering if there is a general rule for how many access points
>to use per number of users that will be on a network. I am looking at
>an area that can easily be covered by 1 to 2 access points. My concern
>is that 2 access points won't handle the necessary bandwidth for up to
>150 users.


http://www.nanog.org/mtg-0302/ppt/joel.pdf
has an interesting case study.

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/...pdg/dg10ic.htm
has some interesting measurements (that do not directly answer
your question.)

Mark Gallagher 01-19-2007 08:54 PM

Re: WLAN Planning
 
Depends on the size of the area you intend to cover, the cut-through
and potential interference of the walls, objects, and even persons in
the designated service area.
With b/g you can co-locate up to three APs using non-overlapping
channels for throughput aggregation. You can get even more
non-overlapping channels if your clients can be constrained to 802.11a.
You will want to spend some time designing your network so that even if
you have an ideal number of users per access point, and that you have a
good strategy for managing your traffic flow. From what I understand,
APs are essentially shared medium like a hub, and congestion can be a
severe problem, especially if your clients are not carefully managed
and your limited number of APs have to fall back to b-only operation,
etc.
I've always used 1 AP per 40 users as a rule of thumb, but my site
surveys rarely if ever correlated to that measure. On the other hand
my networks have been generally over-built but I would rather spend
little extra and never have to listen to anyone report connectivity
problems that could not be solved at the client engineering level.

mark

On Jan 19, 12:02 pm, "dnuckle" <david.nuck...@hulanetworks.com> wrote:
> I was wondering if there is a general rule for how many access points
> to use per number of users that will be on a network. I am looking at
> an area that can easily be covered by 1 to 2 access points. My concern
> is that 2 access points won't handle the necessary bandwidth for up to
> 150 users. I know even on the router side with that many users I
> likely will get a lot of latency, especially during peak traffic times.
> I was looking at the 1130 a/b/g access points. Some feedback would be
> greatly appreciated.
>
> David



www.BradReese.Com 01-19-2007 11:13 PM

Re: WLAN Planning
 
Hi David,

Go to Cisco Tools:

http://www.bradreese.com/cisco-tools.htm

-----------------------------------

In the right column click on the link that says:

Cisco WLAN Productivity Savings Payback Calculator

-----------------------------------

Then click on the link that says:

Calculate access points needed

Sincerely,

Brad Reese
2007 Cisco Salary Rates
http://www.bradreese.com/compensation-database.htm



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