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sakcee@gmail.com 11-06-2006 05:42 AM

glass reflection in photo
 
Hi

I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce the
glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove that
white reflection,

thanks

the link to the photo is
http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/sakcee...d&.dnm=6fb5scd...


Paul Rubin 11-06-2006 06:28 AM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 
sakcee@gmail.com writes:
> I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
> suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce the
> glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
> with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
> there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove that
> white reflection,


Your best bet for glass reflections is use a polarizing filter when
you take the picture. You can't accomplish this in photoshop
afterwards.

Randy Berbaum 11-06-2006 07:11 AM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 
sakcee@gmail.com wrote:
: Hi

: I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
: suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce the
: glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
: with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
: there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove that
: white reflection,

unfortunately this is one of the few problems that is difficult or
impossible to digitally fix in post production. The best way , of course,
is to use a polarizing filter at the time of shooting to reduce or
eliminate the reflection.

But there are some ways to reduce the impact of reflections in some
photos. In some photos I have been able to select and re-color the
reflected object to make it a tiny bit less noticable. But this is very
rare that the conditions are right for this. Also anything that the
reflected image obscures will continue to be obstructed. I have had a few
images when I could play with the brightness and contrast a bit which
reduced the obvious reflection.

It can't hurt to play with the various controls and maybe even play with
the dodge tool (looks like a lollypop in the same tool slot as the hand
making an "O"). As long as you don't save the trials back to the same file
name you can't loose anything in trying. But don't get too upset if
nothing works. The odds are very very very against you.

Sorry I couldn't be more encouraging.

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL


Don Stauffer in Minnesota 11-06-2006 02:13 PM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 

sakcee@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi
>
> I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
> suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce the
> glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
> with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
> there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove that
> white reflection,
>
> thanks
>
> the link to the photo is
> http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/sakcee...d&.dnm=6fb5scd...


It is a LOT of work,and takes some skill. However, what you can do is
select the region with the reflection (best to select the whole glass
if you can) and reduce contrast while playing with brightness to keep
average brightness of the area the same.

If the shot is through a single piece of glass, you can select the
intended object, reverse the selection so that it applies to everything
EXCEPT the intended subject, and again reduce contrast while adjusting
brightness to retain original brightness.

An alternative is to use a cloning brush, set the cloning tool to a lot
of transparancy, and repeatedly paint over the unwanted reflection,
replacing the reflection with what is in the area surrounding the
reflection.

This operation is similar to one where you "remove" a person from a
group of people.


Mike Fields 11-07-2006 02:00 AM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 

"Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote in message
news:7xbqnljdhj.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
> sakcee@gmail.com writes:
>> I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
>> suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce
>> the
>> glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
>> with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
>> there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove
>> that
>> white reflection,

>
> Your best bet for glass reflections is use a polarizing filter when
> you take the picture. You can't accomplish this in photoshop
> afterwards.


Often a polarizer is bad news for the safety glass in cars -
it shows all sorts of stress things in the glass. I have seen
some really strange patterns when viewing auto glass
through a polarizer (spots and other strange things). While post
processing is very tough, one thing that works fairly well
is either a black cloth or black shirt to make it as dark as
possible behind the window when you are taking pictures
from a vehicle with a window you can't open (the airlines
frown on my opening the window at 37,000 feet for some
reason). I use that when I can when shooting from an
airplane and it usually works fairly well.

mikey


Ron Hunter 11-07-2006 09:23 AM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 
Mike Fields wrote:
>
> "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote in message
> news:7xbqnljdhj.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
>> sakcee@gmail.com writes:
>>> I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
>>> suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce the
>>> glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
>>> with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
>>> there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove that
>>> white reflection,

>>
>> Your best bet for glass reflections is use a polarizing filter when
>> you take the picture. You can't accomplish this in photoshop
>> afterwards.

>
> Often a polarizer is bad news for the safety glass in cars -
> it shows all sorts of stress things in the glass. I have seen
> some really strange patterns when viewing auto glass
> through a polarizer (spots and other strange things). While post
> processing is very tough, one thing that works fairly well
> is either a black cloth or black shirt to make it as dark as
> possible behind the window when you are taking pictures
> from a vehicle with a window you can't open (the airlines
> frown on my opening the window at 37,000 feet for some
> reason). I use that when I can when shooting from an
> airplane and it usually works fairly well.
>
> mikey
>


There are other considerations when shooting through car windows, such
as some window coatings cause IR to be reflected messing up focus. I
always set my camera to 'landscape' mode which sets focus to 'infinity'.
Saves time, and eliminates any negative effect the window coating may
cause. The problem of reflections can be minimized by holding the
camera as close to the window as possible. Polarizers aren't
recommended for pictures through stressed, or safety glass.

Mike Fields 11-07-2006 12:54 PM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 

"Ron Hunter" <rphunter@charter.net> wrote in message
news:scKdnXIU08o7zc3YnZ2dnUVZ_qGdnZ2d@giganews.com ...
> Mike Fields wrote:
>>
>> "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote in message
>> news:7xbqnljdhj.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
>>> sakcee@gmail.com writes:
>>>> I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
>>>> suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce
>>>> the
>>>> glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a
>>>> car
>>>> with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt ,
>>>> is
>>>> there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove
>>>> that
>>>> white reflection,
>>>
>>> Your best bet for glass reflections is use a polarizing filter when
>>> you take the picture. You can't accomplish this in photoshop
>>> afterwards.

>>
>> Often a polarizer is bad news for the safety glass in cars -
>> it shows all sorts of stress things in the glass. I have seen
>> some really strange patterns when viewing auto glass
>> through a polarizer (spots and other strange things). While post
>> processing is very tough, one thing that works fairly well
>> is either a black cloth or black shirt to make it as dark as
>> possible behind the window when you are taking pictures
>> from a vehicle with a window you can't open (the airlines
>> frown on my opening the window at 37,000 feet for some
>> reason). I use that when I can when shooting from an
>> airplane and it usually works fairly well.
>>
>> mikey
>>

>
> There are other considerations when shooting through car windows, such
> as some window coatings cause IR to be reflected messing up focus. I
> always set my camera to 'landscape' mode which sets focus to
> 'infinity'. Saves time, and eliminates any negative effect the window
> coating may cause. The problem of reflections can be minimized by
> holding the camera as close to the window as possible. Polarizers
> aren't recommended for pictures through stressed, or safety glass.


One comment on Ron's statement - "holding the camera as
close to the window as possible" means close but NOT
touching the window. Unless the vehicle is completely stationary,
if you touch the window, you immediately pick up any
engine/road vibration in the camera. Close is close WITHOUT
touching.

mikey


Ron Hunter 11-07-2006 07:36 PM

Re: glass reflection in photo
 
Mike Fields wrote:
>
> "Ron Hunter" <rphunter@charter.net> wrote in message
> news:scKdnXIU08o7zc3YnZ2dnUVZ_qGdnZ2d@giganews.com ...
>> Mike Fields wrote:
>>>
>>> "Paul Rubin" <http://phr.cx@NOSPAM.invalid> wrote in message
>>> news:7xbqnljdhj.fsf@ruckus.brouhaha.com...
>>>> sakcee@gmail.com writes:
>>>>> I am very novice user of photoshop, I was wondering if someone can
>>>>> suggest some photoshop filter or techiniques by which i can reduce the
>>>>> glass reflection on the pictures, I took the pictures while in a car
>>>>> with car window up and there is a white reflection of a t-shirt , is
>>>>> there a way that I can set some kind of noise threshold to remove that
>>>>> white reflection,
>>>>
>>>> Your best bet for glass reflections is use a polarizing filter when
>>>> you take the picture. You can't accomplish this in photoshop
>>>> afterwards.
>>>
>>> Often a polarizer is bad news for the safety glass in cars -
>>> it shows all sorts of stress things in the glass. I have seen
>>> some really strange patterns when viewing auto glass
>>> through a polarizer (spots and other strange things). While post
>>> processing is very tough, one thing that works fairly well
>>> is either a black cloth or black shirt to make it as dark as
>>> possible behind the window when you are taking pictures
>>> from a vehicle with a window you can't open (the airlines
>>> frown on my opening the window at 37,000 feet for some
>>> reason). I use that when I can when shooting from an
>>> airplane and it usually works fairly well.
>>>
>>> mikey
>>>

>>
>> There are other considerations when shooting through car windows, such
>> as some window coatings cause IR to be reflected messing up focus. I
>> always set my camera to 'landscape' mode which sets focus to
>> 'infinity'. Saves time, and eliminates any negative effect the window
>> coating may cause. The problem of reflections can be minimized by
>> holding the camera as close to the window as possible. Polarizers
>> aren't recommended for pictures through stressed, or safety glass.

>
> One comment on Ron's statement - "holding the camera as
> close to the window as possible" means close but NOT
> touching the window. Unless the vehicle is completely stationary,
> if you touch the window, you immediately pick up any
> engine/road vibration in the camera. Close is close WITHOUT
> touching.
>
> mikey
>

Yes, and it may not be good for the extended barrel of the lens, either.


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