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-   -   Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t429078-full-frame-lenses-vs-small-sensor-lenses.html)

measekite 09-11-2006 02:29 PM

Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
People say it is not a good idea to purchase the smaller sensor lenses
for Nikon and Canon since they would be ineffective if you want to
upgrade to a full frame 5D or if Nikon brings out a full frame DSLR.

Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?

Is there any advantage to purchasing smaller sensor lenses?

What are the designations for both Canon and Nikon for the full frame
and small sensor lenses?

pixel_a_ted 09-11-2006 04:02 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
measekite wrote:
> People say it is not a good idea to purchase the smaller sensor lenses
> for Nikon and Canon since they would be ineffective if you want to
> upgrade to a full frame 5D or if Nikon brings out a full frame DSLR.


That's true and it is a consideration. But some people believe that the
current sensor size will be around for a long time. 35 mm cameras did
not disappear because of large format cameras.

> Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?


Heavier, more expensive, plus see next answer.

> Is there any advantage to purchasing smaller sensor lenses?


Lighter, less expensive. Also, some manufacturers claim they have
optimized the lenses for use with the shiny sensor in digital cameras.

> What are the designations for both Canon and Nikon for the full frame and small
> sensor lenses?


For Nikon it's DX for the small sensor lenses; any lens without the DX
designation is for full frame.
..


Shaun 09-11-2006 05:41 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
> Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?

Yup. Quite often the range of full frame zoom lenses aren't suited to
cropped sensors. For example, a zoom starting at 24-105mm lens would have
an excellent range for full frame, but not very wide on a cropped sensor.
Also, with the Canon range, the better quality 'L' lenses are really
tailored towards full frame. So getting a 'L' zoom for a cropped sensor
body usually results in a non ideal range. A 16-35 L isn't really that wide
on a cropped body, so to get a super wide angle lens, you would need to go
for a 10-22 non 'L' lens.

> Is there any advantage to purchasing smaller sensor lenses?


Pretty much the opposite to above.

> What are the designations for both Canon and Nikon for the full frame and
> small sensor lenses?


Canon full frame lenses are EF, Canon cropped sensor body lenses are EF-S.
Although the full frame EF lenses will fit on the cropped sensor bodies
without any problems.


"measekite" <inkystinky@oem.com> wrote in message
news:YoeNg.162$e66.135@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com. ..
> People say it is not a good idea to purchase the smaller sensor lenses for
> Nikon and Canon since they would be ineffective if you want to upgrade to
> a full frame 5D or if Nikon brings out a full frame DSLR.
>
> Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?
>
> Is there any advantage to purchasing smaller sensor lenses?
>
> What are the designations for both Canon and Nikon for the full frame and
> small sensor lenses?




eyalnevo@gmail.com 09-11-2006 07:03 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
Shaun wrote:
> > Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?

>
> Yup. Quite often the range of full frame zoom lenses aren't suited to
> cropped sensors. For example, a zoom starting at 24-105mm lens would have
> an excellent range for full frame, but not very wide on a cropped sensor.
> Also, with the Canon range, the better quality 'L' lenses are really
> tailored towards full frame. So getting a 'L' zoom for a cropped sensor
> body usually results in a non ideal range. A 16-35 L isn't really that wide
> on a cropped body, so to get a super wide angle lens, you would need to go
> for a 10-22 non 'L' lens.
>


That's not true. absolutely. Cropped image is what it is. cropped. most
of the lenses inacuracies exist in the outer fringes of its image. Very
often a mediocre full frame lense will be just perfect for a small
sensor because it will not show its outer area. In addition, a 10-22
lense is still 10-22 equivalent. it's about 16-30 on the camera. an
EF-S lens doenst mean its numbers are as of 35mm, they dont do this
conversion for you.


Shaun 09-11-2006 07:17 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
What part isn't true?


<eyalnevo@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1158001394.999892.6030@m73g2000cwd.googlegrou ps.com...
> Shaun wrote:
>> > Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?

>>
>> Yup. Quite often the range of full frame zoom lenses aren't suited to
>> cropped sensors. For example, a zoom starting at 24-105mm lens would
>> have
>> an excellent range for full frame, but not very wide on a cropped sensor.
>> Also, with the Canon range, the better quality 'L' lenses are really
>> tailored towards full frame. So getting a 'L' zoom for a cropped sensor
>> body usually results in a non ideal range. A 16-35 L isn't really that
>> wide
>> on a cropped body, so to get a super wide angle lens, you would need to
>> go
>> for a 10-22 non 'L' lens.
>>

>
> That's not true. absolutely. Cropped image is what it is. cropped. most
> of the lenses inacuracies exist in the outer fringes of its image. Very
> often a mediocre full frame lense will be just perfect for a small
> sensor because it will not show its outer area. In addition, a 10-22
> lense is still 10-22 equivalent. it's about 16-30 on the camera. an
> EF-S lens doenst mean its numbers are as of 35mm, they dont do this
> conversion for you.
>




Dave Cohen 09-11-2006 08:30 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
pixel_a_ted wrote:
> measekite wrote:
>> People say it is not a good idea to purchase the smaller sensor lenses
>> for Nikon and Canon since they would be ineffective if you want to
>> upgrade to a full frame 5D or if Nikon brings out a full frame DSLR.

>
> That's true and it is a consideration. But some people believe that the
> current sensor size will be around for a long time. 35 mm cameras did
> not disappear because of large format cameras.


In the interest of historical accuracy, 35mm cameras appeared after
large format cameras, which, while they didn't disappear did shrink a
little.
Dave Cohen
>
>> Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?

>
> Heavier, more expensive, plus see next answer.
>
>> Is there any advantage to purchasing smaller sensor lenses?

>
> Lighter, less expensive. Also, some manufacturers claim they have
> optimized the lenses for use with the shiny sensor in digital cameras.
>
>> What are the designations for both Canon and Nikon for the full frame and small
>> sensor lenses?

>
> For Nikon it's DX for the small sensor lenses; any lens without the DX
> designation is for full frame.
> .
>


Prometheus 09-11-2006 10:42 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
In article <1158001394.999892.6030@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.c om>,
"eyalnevo@gmail.com" <eyalnevo@gmail.com> writes
>Shaun wrote:
>> > Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?

>>
>> Yup. Quite often the range of full frame zoom lenses aren't suited to
>> cropped sensors. For example, a zoom starting at 24-105mm lens would have
>> an excellent range for full frame, but not very wide on a cropped sensor.
>> Also, with the Canon range, the better quality 'L' lenses are really
>> tailored towards full frame. So getting a 'L' zoom for a cropped sensor
>> body usually results in a non ideal range. A 16-35 L isn't really that wide
>> on a cropped body, so to get a super wide angle lens, you would need to go
>> for a 10-22 non 'L' lens.
>>

>
>That's not true. absolutely. Cropped image is what it is. cropped. most
>of the lenses inacuracies exist in the outer fringes of its image. Very
>often a mediocre full frame lense will be just perfect for a small
>sensor because it will not show its outer area. In addition, a 10-22
>lense is still 10-22 equivalent. it's about 16-30 on the camera. an
>EF-S lens doenst mean its numbers are as of 35mm, they dont do this
>conversion for you.


That is not what he is saying, he is saying that a 16 mm lens is not
very wide on a cropped body because it will only have the angle of view
a 26 mm lens gives on a full-frame body, if you want the view that a 16
mm lens gave you on 35 mm film you will need a 10 mm lens for your (1.6)
cropped sensor. And a 24 mm lens only gives the angle of view that a 38
mm lens has.

--
Ian G8ILZ

John McWilliams 09-11-2006 10:43 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
Shaun wrote:
> What part isn't true?
>
>

The part about top posting.

--
lsmft

measekite 09-12-2006 04:01 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 


pixel_a_ted wrote:

>measekite wrote:
>
>
>>People say it is not a good idea to purchase the smaller sensor lenses
>>for Nikon and Canon since they would be ineffective if you want to
>>upgrade to a full frame 5D or if Nikon brings out a full frame DSLR.
>>
>>

>
>That's true and it is a consideration. But some people believe that the
>current sensor size will be around for a long time. 35 mm cameras did
>not disappear because of large format cameras.
>
>


I understand but if you look at the past few years DSLR camera are
becomming a better value. More for the same or less money. Look at the
$7000 full frame Canon and now you can get the little brother 5D for
around $3000. Going on then in the not too distant future you may be
able to get maybe a 4D for around $1500. If that is the case then
people who bought the APS size lenses would be at a disadvantage if they
wanted to upgrade.

It seems that to get the benefits of DX or EF-S lenses one is taking a
chance that they will not be able to upgrade.

>
>
>>Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?
>>
>>

>
>Heavier, more expensive, plus see next answer.
>
>
>
>>Is there any advantage to purchasing smaller sensor lenses?
>>
>>

>
>Lighter, less expensive. Also, some manufacturers claim they have
>optimized the lenses for use with the shiny sensor in digital cameras.
>
>
>
>>What are the designations for both Canon and Nikon for the full frame and small
>>sensor lenses?
>>
>>

>
>For Nikon it's DX for the small sensor lenses; any lens without the DX
>designation is for full frame.
>.
>
>
>


Bill Funk 09-12-2006 04:24 PM

Re: Full Frame Lenses vs Small Sensor Lenses
 
On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 20:17:13 +0100, "Shaun" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>What part isn't true?


The part about the L lenses.
>
>
><eyalnevo@gmail.com> wrote in message
>news:1158001394.999892.6030@m73g2000cwd.googlegro ups.com...
>> Shaun wrote:
>>> > Is there any disadvantage to purchasing only full frame lenses?
>>>
>>> Yup. Quite often the range of full frame zoom lenses aren't suited to
>>> cropped sensors. For example, a zoom starting at 24-105mm lens would
>>> have
>>> an excellent range for full frame, but not very wide on a cropped sensor.
>>> Also, with the Canon range, the better quality 'L' lenses are really
>>> tailored towards full frame. So getting a 'L' zoom for a cropped sensor
>>> body usually results in a non ideal range. A 16-35 L isn't really that
>>> wide
>>> on a cropped body, so to get a super wide angle lens, you would need to
>>> go
>>> for a 10-22 non 'L' lens.
>>>

>>
>> That's not true. absolutely. Cropped image is what it is. cropped. most
>> of the lenses inacuracies exist in the outer fringes of its image. Very
>> often a mediocre full frame lense will be just perfect for a small
>> sensor because it will not show its outer area. In addition, a 10-22
>> lense is still 10-22 equivalent. it's about 16-30 on the camera. an
>> EF-S lens doenst mean its numbers are as of 35mm, they dont do this
>> conversion for you.
>>

>

--
Bill Funk
replace "g" with "a"


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