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qazmlp 07-08-2003 06:59 AM

Header Inclusion style
 
If I include the headers(.h files) like
#include "myHeader.h",
in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
included. But, when I include it like
#include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.

What setting do I need to do such that, the latter syntax also accepted
for my headers ?

Bertrand Mollinier Toublet 07-08-2003 07:06 AM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
qazmlp wrote:
> If I include the headers(.h files) like
> #include "myHeader.h",
> in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
> included. But, when I include it like
> #include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.
>
> What setting do I need to do such that, the latter syntax also accepted
> for my headers ?


[replied only in c.l.c]

None that you should know about. The latter syntax is reserved for
standard headers (in the ISO C meaning of the term), and any header your
implementation is willing to consider standard.

Your own headers are your own only, and should always be included with
the #include "foo.h" syntax.

--
Bertrand Mollinier Toublet
"Reality exists" - Richard Heathfield, 1 July 2003


Floyd Davidson 07-08-2003 07:56 AM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
qazmlp1209@rediffmail.com (qazmlp) wrote:
>If I include the headers(.h files) like
>#include "myHeader.h",
>in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
>included. But, when I include it like
>#include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.
>
>What setting do I need to do such that, the latter syntax also accepted
>for my headers ?


The <...> notation finds headers "in the standard places", hence
system headers, as opposed to those that you provide, will be
found.

The "..." notation probably looks in the current working
directory first, and will thus include headers you provide,
before looking in the same places that <...> will look.

That means you probably want to use the different notations
thusly,

#include <stdio.h> /* header provided by the platform */
#include "myhdr.h> /* header provided by the program */

With unix style compilers you also have the option of adding to
the places the compiler thinks of as "standard", usually with
the -I option. Hence invoking the compiler with '-I./include'
will cause the <...> notation to also look in the ./include
directory for headers.

You'll definitely want to read the documentation for your
compiler. You can also look for an option that will tell you
more about what it is doing. For example, with the GNU C
compiler, gcc, you can give it the -v option and it will
verbosely explain what it is doing and where it is searching for
headers (and libraries, and whatever).

--
Floyd L. Davidson <http://web.newsguy.com/floyd_davidson>
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) floyd@barrow.com

Darrell Grainger 07-08-2003 01:18 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
On 7 Jul 2003, qazmlp wrote:

> If I include the headers(.h files) like
> #include "myHeader.h",
> in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
> included. But, when I include it like
> #include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.
>
> What setting do I need to do such that, the latter syntax also accepted
> for my headers ?


The places searched are implementation defined for both formats. You'd
have to consult your compiler documentation to find out where it searches
for the different headers.

Typically, #include <file.h> will search the system header files and
#include "file.h" will search the project header files and then the system
header files.

Why is it important that you use #include <file.h> to find your header
files? If I looked at your source code I would assume the header file is
an implementation specific header file for a certain compiler. It would
not immediately occur to me that it was a project header file. When I see
#include "file.h" I immediately think this is a file created by the
project programmer and not the compiler company. This is all jut
convention but having conventions makes it easier for you to work with
others.

--
main(){int j=1234;char t[]=":@abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz.\n",*i=
"iqgbgxmdbjlgdv.lksrqek.n";char *strchr(const char *,int);while(
*i){j+=strchr(t,*i++)-t;j%=sizeof t-1;putchar(t[j]);} return 0;}


JCB 07-08-2003 02:49 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
qazmlp1209@rediffmail.com (qazmlp) wrote in message news:<db9bbf31.0307072259.edabd00@posting.google.c om>...
> If I include the headers(.h files) like
> #include "myHeader.h",
> in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
> included. But, when I include it like
> #include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.
>
> What setting do I need to do such that, the latter syntax also accepted
> for my headers ?



I don't think you can.
If it was the case, your program will be less clear, because less easy
to distinguish beetween standard headers and "personnal" headers.

Just one question : why do you want to use the <file.h> syntax with
your personal headers ???

Ben Pfaff 07-08-2003 04:45 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
Floyd Davidson <floyd@barrow.com> writes:

> #include "myhdr.h> /* header provided by the program */


Is that a joke?

Default User 07-08-2003 05:02 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 


qazmlp wrote:
>
> If I include the headers(.h files) like
> #include "myHeader.h",
> in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
> included. But, when I include it like
> #include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.



This guy just HAS to be trolling. He's supposedly been studying C and
C++ for over a year now, he's posted dozens if not hundreds of questions
to various groups, all of them these simplistic matters that he could
have figured out by reading the books he claims to own or from a brief
google search.




Brian Rodenborn

Emmanuel Delahaye 07-08-2003 07:26 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
In 'comp.lang.c', qazmlp1209@rediffmail.com (qazmlp) wrote:

> If I include the headers(.h files) like
> #include "myHeader.h",
> in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
> included. But, when I include it like
> #include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.


Good.

> What setting do I need to do such that, the latter syntax also accepted
> for my headers ?
>


The <> headers are reserved for the implementation (standard or not).
The "" headers are reserved for the user's headers.

--
-ed- emdelYOURBRA@noos.fr [remove YOURBRA before answering me]
The C-language FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
<blank line>
FAQ de f.c.l.c : http://www.isty-info.uvsq.fr/~rumeau/fclc/

Emmanuel Delahaye 07-08-2003 07:28 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
In 'comp.lang.c', Dave Uhring <daveuhring@yahoo.com> wrote:

> On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 23:59:02 -0700, qazmlp wrote:
>
>> If I include the headers(.h files) like
>> #include "myHeader.h",
>> in my implementation file(.C file), then 'myHeader.h' is properly
>> included. But, when I include it like
>> #include <myHeader.h>, Compiler gives an error.

>
> "myHeader.h" without that comma is in the current working directory.


This is completely implementation dependent.

> <myHeader.h> is in /usr/include or one referenced by some -I/directory or
> -isystem /somedirectory.


This is completely implementation dependent.

The good reason was exposed already on the other posts.

<> -> implementation
"" -> user

--
-ed- emdelYOURBRA@noos.fr [remove YOURBRA before answering me]
The C-language FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
<blank line>
FAQ de f.c.l.c : http://www.isty-info.uvsq.fr/~rumeau/fclc/

Dave Uhring 07-08-2003 07:47 PM

Re: Header Inclusion style
 
On Tue, 08 Jul 2003 19:28:11 +0000, Emmanuel Delahaye wrote:

> This is completely implementation dependent.
>
> The good reason was exposed already on the other posts.
>
> <> -> implementation
> "" -> user


Works the same way with gcc and Solaris cc. What is your point?



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