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-   -   Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome (http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t270504-best-buy-decides-all-customers-are-not-welcome.html)

Justin 11-08-2004 08:35 PM

Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1...l?mod=yahoo_hs

> The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for
> rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at
> returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders,"
> severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then
> flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price
> quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its
> lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says
> Mr. Anderson.


While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
only loss leaders?



Mike Kohary 11-08-2004 09:11 PM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
Justin wrote:
> http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1...l?mod=yahoo_hs
>
>> The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for
>> rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at
>> returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders,"
>> severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then
>> flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price
>> quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its
>> lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says
>> Mr. Anderson.

>
> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
> only loss leaders?


People that apply for rebates, and then return the merchandise. :)

In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty little
secret is that the mantra isn't true. Sometimes, customers are just plain
wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to buy something,
doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately many customers
believe.

Some customers just aren't worth the hassle. In my own business (I'm a
photographer), I've turned away clients who cost me more in time and energy
than they're worth. If I can service 3 other clients in the time it takes
me to service one ornery, picky client, then it's not worth it to me to
retain that single client. I let them down easy, to be sure, but I'd rather
let someone else deal with them.

Here's another good example of this principle at work (though the specific
story is an urban legend, the philosophy behind it is not):

http://www.snopes.com/business/consumer/bethune.asp

In my opinion, a good business goes out of its way to satisfy customers, but
only to a reasonable extent. It does not necessarily believe that the
customer is always right, because some customers are simply wrong. Some
people are unreasonable jerks, and nothing you can do will satisfy them -
trying to do so mostly hurts your business in the end. It's best to try and
recognize those customers and then jettison them, employing as much damage
control as possible.

Best Buy, as a retailer, is breaking new ground in their business niche.
For my part, I think it's about damned time. :)

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com

Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Neill Massello 11-09-2004 12:24 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:

> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates??


Just about every rebate offer I've ever seen required the original UPC
code from the box. If Best Buy is actually getting scammed this way,
it's because their employees don't inspect the returned items carefully.
I know from personal experience that they don't: I've seen *defective*
returned items put back out for sale.


> Or buying only loss leaders?


From scanning the WSJ article, my impression is that Brad Anderson is
one of those CEOs who see his customers as adversaries to be beaten.
Best Buy has always crapped on its customers, and many of them know it.
They shop there primarily for price, not for the expertise of the
employees or the quality of the shopping experience.

Best Buy is not going to entice high-end customers from the salons nor
low-end customers from Wal-Mart, etc; and consumers who are
sophisticated as well as price-sensitive are moving to the Internet for
their electronics purchases. Know anybody who's going to buy his next
computer from Best Buy?


Justin 11-09-2004 01:28 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
Neill Massello wrote on [Tue, 09 Nov 2004 00:24:12 GMT]:
> Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
>
>> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
>> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates??

>
> Just about every rebate offer I've ever seen required the original UPC
> code from the box.


Exactly! And how do they return an item if they can't scan it to know
it's price etc?

> If Best Buy is actually getting scammed this way,
> it's because their employees don't inspect the returned items carefully.
> I know from personal experience that they don't: I've seen *defective*
> returned items put back out for sale.


Yep.

>> Or buying only loss leaders?

>
> From scanning the WSJ article, my impression is that Brad Anderson is
> one of those CEOs who see his customers as adversaries to be beaten.
> Best Buy has always crapped on its customers, and many of them know it.
> They shop there primarily for price, not for the expertise of the
> employees or the quality of the shopping experience.
>
> Best Buy is not going to entice high-end customers from the salons nor
> low-end customers from Wal-Mart, etc; and consumers who are
> sophisticated as well as price-sensitive are moving to the Internet for
> their electronics purchases. Know anybody who's going to buy his next
> computer from Best Buy?


I don't think I know many people that EVER bought a PC at Best Buy.

Invid Fan 11-09-2004 01:44 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
In article <slrncp07al.c9j.nospam@debian.dns2go.com>, Justin
<nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:

> Neill Massello wrote on [Tue, 09 Nov 2004 00:24:12 GMT]:
> > Justin <nospam@insightbb.com> wrote:
> >
> >> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
> >> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates??

> >
> > Just about every rebate offer I've ever seen required the original UPC
> > code from the box.

>
> Exactly! And how do they return an item if they can't scan it to know
> it's price etc?
>

I just bought a digital camera and printer from Best Buy, and the
rebate for one of them (a $25 gift card) needed a photocopy of the UPC
code.

--
Chris Mack "Refugee, total ****. That's how I've always seen us.
'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
-'Deal/No Deal', CHESS

Bill 11-09-2004 02:21 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 

>
> In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
> it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
> customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty
> little secret is that the mantra isn't true. Sometimes, customers are
> just plain wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to
> buy something, doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately
> many customers believe.
>


Amen. I don't run a business, but I worked in customer service for a catalog
mail order company long enough to realize how ridiculous that the "customer
is always right" mantra actually is.

The company that I worked for (a two-bit operation called "Newport News
Catalog," which was more famous for backorders than anything else) was a
subsidiary of the almost-dead Spiegel catalog, which gave me access to the
Spiegel customer service database. Though I tried to satisfy callers within
reason, I was very suspicious of a customer's "didn't get my merchandise"
claim one evening, as it was the second or third claim in a short period of
time. I then checked that same customer's history in the Spiegel
database--jeez all mighty...Spiegel reps, over a period of 18 months, had
issued credit after credit after credit to this person for items ordered and
allegedly not received, items returned and no credits issued, order received
but incomplete, etc., etc., etc...one rep even wrote in a comment field
about how friendly the customer was...sure, that customer had a reason to be
friendly--she had stumbled across a gold mine in the Spiegel customer
service department.

In this case, I blame the company as much as I blame the customer, as their
reps obviously didn't bother checking this customer's history before blindly
issuing credits...but it's a shining example of the type of bilking that can
and does happen.

There's a time and a place to politely but firmly say, "We don't want your
business--please go somewhere else."






LASERandDVDfan 11-09-2004 03:17 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
>In my opinion, a good business goes out of its way to satisfy customers, but
>only to a reasonable extent. It does not necessarily believe that the
>customer is always right, because some customers are simply wrong. Some
>people are unreasonable jerks, and nothing you can do will satisfy them -
>trying to do so mostly hurts your business in the end. It's best to try and
>recognize those customers and then jettison them, employing as much damage
>control as possible.


Unfortunately, that is too true.

I believe in the mantra that "the customer is always right." However, I also
believe that it also expects the customer to be honorable and not try take
advantage of the mantra to selfishly and intentionally defraud a business.
It's, more or less, about mutual respect between the customer and the business.


As long as you respect the customer and his needs, the customer should respect
you and your needs, which is what I believe the term implies as opposed to
making a direct and literal statement that the customer is always right. It's
a philosophy, and the meaning of philosophies can mean more, less, or be
different than what is literally suggested.

If you respect the customer, but the customer doesn't respect you, then he's
wasting your time that you could use on serious customers that may be more
deserving of your services. In that case, that particular customer doesn't
deserve courtesy because he's not being courteous to you and is certainly not
out to buy something from you without getting some freebies in the process or
some other mischief that works at your expense.

I've seen cases when I was in a retail store where salespeople had to kick out
a customer. Turns out he was acting like an asshole, trying to get something
done that was against store policy like an immediate refund at a particular
amount where policy dictates issuing a check from the corporate offices or
being overly disrespectful to the employees.

I recall one situation, where a customer referred to a female employee as
"woman" in her face in brutish "redneck" fashion for lack of a better term. Of
course, the manager had some things to say to the customer for his repeated
demeaning remarks before ordering him to leave the store.

I have no sympathy for those kinds of customers. I sympathize only to
customers who just wants things to be fair. - Reinhart

LASERandDVDfan 11-09-2004 03:36 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
>Best Buy is not going to entice high-end customers from the salons

Pretty much. They have expectations that are usually too high for Best Buy to
even meet.

Looking for Denon? Nope, Best Buy doesn't carry them.

How about Sony ES? They carry Sony. But, that's not Sony ES.

How about Martin Logan. "Who?" is what you may likely hear when you ask about
Martin Logan speakers at a Best Buy.

And, try to avoid any white vans you might see in the BB parking lot with those
crooks ... uh ... sales representatives selling "Dogg Digital" or "Theater
Research" speakers at "a super low price when compared to the $1000 asking
price."

(In case you're wondering, no. I have never bought speakers from the back of
vans. I know about them and the fact that the speakers they sell blow under
moderate loads that are far from clipping from the amplifier.) Check these out
for a good laugh, especially the frequency response curve and, on one of them,
the impedance curve.

http://www.gr-research.com/dahlton.htm

http://www.gr-research.com/diyevents/white.htm

nor
>low-end customers from Wal-Mart


True, too. They would probably look at a Yamaha receiver and say "Geez, I
thought Yamaha only made motorcycles!" They'd also shrug off the price of the
Yamaha and go for a Durabrand HTiB with a built-in DVD player, because "it's
cheap but should be just as good."

consumers who are
>sophisticated as well as price-sensitive are moving to the Internet for
>their electronics purchases.


True, to an extent.

>Know anybody who's going to buy his next
>computer from Best Buy?


Not me. After building my first computer, I can never even fathom buying
another computer if I can't assemble it myself with parts that I've
specifically chosen.

For instance, I want to make sure that I have a Seagate or a Maxtor drive
instead of running the chance that my new computer would get a Quantum. -
Reinhart

Invid Fan 11-09-2004 03:59 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
In article <sQVjd.9564$Gm6.1034@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink. net>, Bill
<wh@hotmail.com> wrote:

> >
> > In the retail world, this type of strategy is largely unprecedented, but
> > it's been happening in other areas of business for a long time. "The
> > customer is always right," is the mantra we often hear, but the dirty
> > little secret is that the mantra isn't true. Sometimes, customers are
> > just plain wrong and overly demanding. Just because a consumer wants to
> > buy something, doesn't then entitle them to the world, which unfortunately
> > many customers believe.
> >

>
> Amen. I don't run a business, but I worked in customer service for a catalog
> mail order company long enough to realize how ridiculous that the "customer
> is always right" mantra actually is.
>
> The company that I worked for (a two-bit operation called "Newport News
> Catalog," which was more famous for backorders than anything else) was a
> subsidiary of the almost-dead Spiegel catalog, which gave me access to the
> Spiegel customer service database. Though I tried to satisfy callers within
> reason, I was very suspicious of a customer's "didn't get my merchandise"
> claim one evening, as it was the second or third claim in a short period of
> time. I then checked that same customer's history in the Spiegel
> database--jeez all mighty...Spiegel reps, over a period of 18 months, had
> issued credit after credit after credit to this person for items ordered and
> allegedly not received, items returned and no credits issued, order received
> but incomplete, etc., etc., etc...one rep even wrote in a comment field
> about how friendly the customer was...sure, that customer had a reason to be
> friendly--she had stumbled across a gold mine in the Spiegel customer
> service department.
>
> In this case, I blame the company as much as I blame the customer, as their
> reps obviously didn't bother checking this customer's history before blindly
> issuing credits...but it's a shining example of the type of bilking that can
> and does happen.
>
> There's a time and a place to politely but firmly say, "We don't want your
> business--please go somewhere else."
>

An article in the local paper mentioned that some stores will now
refuse to accept returns if you have a habit of returning things. A
woman found she couldn't return a dress she didn't want (unworn, with
the tags still attached) due to a large number of returns. Well, she
said, she spent $2000 a year at the store so would naturally have more
returns then a casual customer. If you shop at a number of retailers
that all use the same service, your combined returns will count against
you.

--
Chris Mack "Refugee, total ****. That's how I've always seen us.
'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
-'Deal/No Deal', CHESS

tacitus 11-09-2004 04:11 AM

Re: Best Buy Decides all customers are not welcome
 
In article <slrncovm4p.b8t.nospam@debian.dns2go.com>,
nospam@insightbb.com says...
> http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1...l?mod=yahoo_hs
>
> > The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for
> > rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at
> > returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders,"
> > severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then
> > flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price
> > quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its
> > lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says
> > Mr. Anderson.

>
> While I can understand the frustration about returning items to buy at
> returned item discounts, but people that apply for rebates?? Or buying
> only loss leaders?
>
>
>

Alas, as far as I can tell Best Buy has started some
cheap sh*t behaviour in the last few months. For
example, offering an 8-issue subscription for sport
illustrated or entertainment weekly if you use a
credit card while checking out. Then after you
accept, you are handed a densely worded thing to
sign which says your credit card will be automatically
charged after the 8 issues. If you were unwise and
did not notice you would possibly get a subscription
you really did not want. To be fair, I did notice
and it was easy to cancel; but I feel its goal was
to mislead people who aren't paying attention. There
was something else that irritated me, but I can't
remember

[I apologize if this is sent multiple times; my
client and/or connection had been acting up lately]


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