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Gerry 07-02-2003 01:16 PM

Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 
Disney adds PC touches to old cartoons

Andy Seiler
USA Today
Jun. 18, 2003 12:00 AM

Eagle-eyed animation fans say there's something strange abreast with
Knickknack, the critically acclaimed 1989 short that precedes Disney-Pixar's
Finding Nemo at theaters nationwide.

The short follows the hapless attempts of a lonely snow-globe snowman to
escape his domain and join a plastic Miami beach bunny. Fans of the film,
which was released on a G-rated 1996 video collection called Tiny Toy
Stories, say the Miami beauty and a mermaid, who appears at the end of the
short, originally were more well-endowed.

"In the original, the girls have breasts the size of large grapefruit," says
Raymond Tucker of Greensboro, N.C. "In the new version, the breasts just
aren't there."

Though Disney and Pixar aren't talking, fans say the reduction reduces the
humor of the short.

Paul Poroshin, 23, an animation buff from Old Bridge, N.J., suspects the
women were deflated to make the short more politically correct.

"It can be argued that this breast removal does nothing to the story or that
it's just some sexual male thing, but to me it's all about intent and the
vision of an artist," Poroshin says. "The snowman is after a large-breasted
girl. His facial expressions tell it all, especially when, in the end, he
dunks in the fish tank and gets trapped again."

Though it's not clear whether Pixar or Disney made the change, Disney has a
history of making subtle changes when reissuing a classic that includes
aspects that might be less savory to modern viewers:


 In the short The Three Little Pigs (1933), the wolf originally tried to
get into a pig's house by pretending to be a Jewish salesman, with a mask
and a Yiddish accent. The scene was reanimated, probably in the 1940s, to
make the wolf look and sound more like he does elsewhere in the cartoon.


 When the feature Melody Time (1948) was released on DVD and video in 2000,
Pecos Bill's omnipresent cigarette was digitally removed from his mouth in
every frame. Gone is the memorable sequence in which he rolls one and grabs
a thundercloud to light the cigarette with a lightning bolt.


 Even in the supposedly uncut, restored Fantasia (1940) released on DVD in
2000, a black "centaurette," the servant of a white centaurette, has been
eliminated, according to animation historian Jerry Beck.

"These films need to be treated like classic films, not kids' fodder," says
Beck, editor of cartoonresearch.com and author of the upcoming book Outlaw
Animation. "Would they cut a frame from The Wizard of Oz or Citizen Kane?
No."

Ironically, Beck says, Disney treats its classic cartoons better than other
studios. "Disney is the only company to treat these films with a lot of
respect," he says. He singles out Disney's ongoing DVD series Walt Disney
Treasures (sample titles: The Complete Goofy, Mickey Mouse in Black and
White, Silly Symphonies) as an example of well-done cartoon reissues. The
series includes the censored version of Pigs.



Gerry 07-02-2003 01:43 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 

> Disney STILL hasn't bothered to release "Song of the South" on DVD
> (just on LaserDisc). Oh well....


Be sure it will be heavily cut for DVD to make it political correct.



Mike Dobony 07-02-2003 02:29 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 

"Gerry"
<Gerryyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy@Gerry.Gerry> wrote in message
news:3f02da99$0$53607$45beb828@newscene.com...
> Disney adds PC touches to old cartoons
>
> Andy Seiler
> USA Today
> Jun. 18, 2003 12:00 AM
>
> Eagle-eyed animation fans say there's something strange abreast with
> Knickknack, the critically acclaimed 1989 short that precedes

Disney-Pixar's
> Finding Nemo at theaters nationwide.
>
> The short follows the hapless attempts of a lonely snow-globe snowman to
> escape his domain and join a plastic Miami beach bunny. Fans of the film,
> which was released on a G-rated 1996 video collection called Tiny Toy
> Stories, say the Miami beauty and a mermaid, who appears at the end of the
> short, originally were more well-endowed.
>
> "In the original, the girls have breasts the size of large grapefruit,"

says
> Raymond Tucker of Greensboro, N.C. "In the new version, the breasts just
> aren't there."
>
> Though Disney and Pixar aren't talking, fans say the reduction reduces the
> humor of the short.
>
> Paul Poroshin, 23, an animation buff from Old Bridge, N.J., suspects the
> women were deflated to make the short more politically correct.
>
> "It can be argued that this breast removal does nothing to the story or

that
> it's just some sexual male thing, but to me it's all about intent and the
> vision of an artist," Poroshin says. "The snowman is after a

large-breasted
> girl. His facial expressions tell it all, especially when, in the end, he
> dunks in the fish tank and gets trapped again."
>
> Though it's not clear whether Pixar or Disney made the change, Disney has

a
> history of making subtle changes when reissuing a classic that includes
> aspects that might be less savory to modern viewers:
>


You forget that Disney is the producer of kiddy porn. And do you really
want a kids program promoting sexual arrousal?

>
>  In the short The Three Little Pigs (1933), the wolf originally tried to
> get into a pig's house by pretending to be a Jewish salesman, with a mask
> and a Yiddish accent. The scene was reanimated, probably in the 1940s, to
> make the wolf look and sound more like he does elsewhere in the cartoon.
>
>
>  When the feature Melody Time (1948) was released on DVD and video in

2000,
> Pecos Bill's omnipresent cigarette was digitally removed from his mouth in
> every frame. Gone is the memorable sequence in which he rolls one and

grabs
> a thundercloud to light the cigarette with a lightning bolt.
>


Should Disney promote smoking? I think not!

>
>  Even in the supposedly uncut, restored Fantasia (1940) released on DVD

in
> 2000, a black "centaurette," the servant of a white centaurette, has been
> eliminated, according to animation historian Jerry Beck.
>
> "These films need to be treated like classic films, not kids' fodder,"

says
> Beck, editor of cartoonresearch.com and author of the upcoming book Outlaw
> Animation. "Would they cut a frame from The Wizard of Oz or Citizen Kane?
> No."
>


Disney, in its own brand name movies needs to keep it's image clean and
wholesome, even if it's other subsidiaries promote dog droppings.


--
Mike D.

Remove .spamnot to respond by email


> Ironically, Beck says, Disney treats its classic cartoons better than

other
> studios. "Disney is the only company to treat these films with a lot of
> respect," he says. He singles out Disney's ongoing DVD series Walt Disney
> Treasures (sample titles: The Complete Goofy, Mickey Mouse in Black and
> White, Silly Symphonies) as an example of well-done cartoon reissues. The
> series includes the censored version of Pigs.
>
>



---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.493 / Virus Database: 292 - Release Date: 6/25/2003



Gerry 07-02-2003 03:03 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 

> You forget that Disney is the producer of kiddy porn. And do you really
> want a kids program promoting sexual arrousal?


Disney is the producer of kiddy porn? You are probably nuts. It's impossible
to see something even naked in Disney cartoons/movies.

> Should Disney promote smoking? I think not!


If you will watch Disney cartoons, you will notice that characters
"promoting" beating/blasting/pressing of each other. Even murdering, of
course in cartoonish way. Is it better than smoking, which is BTW
associating with bad guys?

> Disney, in its own brand name movies needs to keep it's image clean and
> wholesome


That's why Disney movies sucks. I'm personally associate name of Walt Disney
Pictures with something primitive and unoriginal.



WKC 07-02-2003 04:00 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 
It's TRUE. I recently bought SNOW WHITE on DVD. Imagine my surprise when I
saw that they had digitally altered her skin to appear black!!! Talk about
PC!!

WKC.
"Gerry"
<Gerryyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy
yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy@Gerry.Gerry> wrote in message
news:3f02da99$0$53607$45beb828@newscene.com...
> Disney adds PC touches to old cartoons
>
> Andy Seiler
> USA Today
> Jun. 18, 2003 12:00 AM
>
> Eagle-eyed animation fans say there's something strange abreast with
> Knickknack, the critically acclaimed 1989 short that precedes

Disney-Pixar's
> Finding Nemo at theaters nationwide.
>
> The short follows the hapless attempts of a lonely snow-globe snowman to
> escape his domain and join a plastic Miami beach bunny. Fans of the film,
> which was released on a G-rated 1996 video collection called Tiny Toy
> Stories, say the Miami beauty and a mermaid, who appears at the end of the
> short, originally were more well-endowed.
>
> "In the original, the girls have breasts the size of large grapefruit,"

says
> Raymond Tucker of Greensboro, N.C. "In the new version, the breasts just
> aren't there."
>
> Though Disney and Pixar aren't talking, fans say the reduction reduces the
> humor of the short.
>
> Paul Poroshin, 23, an animation buff from Old Bridge, N.J., suspects the
> women were deflated to make the short more politically correct.
>
> "It can be argued that this breast removal does nothing to the story or

that
> it's just some sexual male thing, but to me it's all about intent and the
> vision of an artist," Poroshin says. "The snowman is after a

large-breasted
> girl. His facial expressions tell it all, especially when, in the end, he
> dunks in the fish tank and gets trapped again."
>
> Though it's not clear whether Pixar or Disney made the change, Disney has

a
> history of making subtle changes when reissuing a classic that includes
> aspects that might be less savory to modern viewers:
>
>
>  In the short The Three Little Pigs (1933), the wolf originally tried to
> get into a pig's house by pretending to be a Jewish salesman, with a mask
> and a Yiddish accent. The scene was reanimated, probably in the 1940s, to
> make the wolf look and sound more like he does elsewhere in the cartoon.
>
>
>  When the feature Melody Time (1948) was released on DVD and video in

2000,
> Pecos Bill's omnipresent cigarette was digitally removed from his mouth in
> every frame. Gone is the memorable sequence in which he rolls one and

grabs
> a thundercloud to light the cigarette with a lightning bolt.
>
>
>  Even in the supposedly uncut, restored Fantasia (1940) released on DVD

in
> 2000, a black "centaurette," the servant of a white centaurette, has been
> eliminated, according to animation historian Jerry Beck.
>
> "These films need to be treated like classic films, not kids' fodder,"

says
> Beck, editor of cartoonresearch.com and author of the upcoming book Outlaw
> Animation. "Would they cut a frame from The Wizard of Oz or Citizen Kane?
> No."
>
> Ironically, Beck says, Disney treats its classic cartoons better than

other
> studios. "Disney is the only company to treat these films with a lot of
> respect," he says. He singles out Disney's ongoing DVD series Walt Disney
> Treasures (sample titles: The Complete Goofy, Mickey Mouse in Black and
> White, Silly Symphonies) as an example of well-done cartoon reissues. The
> series includes the censored version of Pigs.
>
>




Tarkus 07-02-2003 04:40 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 
On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 16:00:34 GMT, WKC wrote:

> It's TRUE. I recently bought SNOW WHITE on DVD. Imagine my surprise when I
> saw that they had digitally altered her skin to appear black!!! Talk about
> PC!!


No, you're thinking of COAL BLACK.
--
"I may be bad...but I feel gooood."

Now playing: nothing

Juan F Lara 07-02-2003 05:04 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 
In article <3f02f38f$0$34132$45beb828@newscene.com>,
Gerry <Gerry@Gerry.Gerry> wrote:

> If you will watch Disney cartoons, you will notice that characters
> "promoting" beating/blasting/pressing of each other. Even murdering, of
> course in cartoonish way. Is it better than smoking, which is BTW
> associating with bad guys?


What are you talking about? That sounds more like Warner and MGM cartoons
to me. These are cartoons and one of the fun things you can do in cartoons is
that you can do these violent gags that defy reality. They're all just paint
on cels, pal.

- Juan F. Lara
http://bellsouthpwp.net/l/a/lara6281/intro.html

Bill Steele 07-02-2003 05:50 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 
Gerry> wrote:

> Disney is the producer of kiddy porn? You are probably nuts.


It's what kiddies think of as porn, or at least used to. Annette Funicello
in a tutu, Hayley Mills in her underwear...

Patrick McCart 07-02-2003 10:03 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 
At least Prince Chawmin' was left alone.

(But that's a military secret!)

"Tarkus" <karnevil9@beer.com> wrote in message
news:1jva8myovmv4u.dlg@tarkus.karnevil9.com...
> On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 16:00:34 GMT, WKC wrote:
>
> > It's TRUE. I recently bought SNOW WHITE on DVD. Imagine my surprise

when I
> > saw that they had digitally altered her skin to appear black!!! Talk

about
> > PC!!

>
> No, you're thinking of COAL BLACK.
> --
> "I may be bad...but I feel gooood."
>
> Now playing: nothing




Stephen Cooke 07-02-2003 10:38 PM

Re: Disney censors old cartoons for DVD
 

On Wed, 2 Jul 2003, Patrick McCart wrote:

> At least Prince Chawmin' was left alone.
>
> (But that's a military secret!)


He's got it bad, and that ain't good!

swac
Anyone know of any other '40s cartoons that reference Citizen Kane?



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