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Michael 12-10-2003 01:30 PM

Dress for Success???
 
The Past: My photography teacher in college 25 years ago had the nastiest
looking, most basic Pentax 35mm SLR I ever saw. He was a really good
photographer. He and I both shot artistic photographs. One day he asked
me if money was important to me because there wasn't a lot of money in
the art field. Soon after I was in Engineering school and a few years
later I became a software engineer. My camera sat in the closet for a
long time. Lots of regrets, but no sense in looking back.

The Present: Well, I grew up to be a software design manager. I made good
money for a lot of years, but then I got laid off. I have a Canon G2 that
I brought to Italy earlier this year, and I took some great photographs.
But the more I use the camera, the more I miss the control that I had
with my Minolta SRT 102. I love digital photography. I don't miss sitting
in the darkroom swishing chemicals around.

Looking forward: I still mostly enjoy artistic photography, but I would
like to make some money. I have some ideas I want to explore in
commercial photography. The problem that I have is that I don't a
"professional looking" camera. I wanted to buy a Canon 10D, but I've been
told they are all on back order around here. The 300D is cheaper, and
would probably be OK feature-wise, but I don't think it looks
professional enough.

Am I being too much of a fashion snob, or is there any truth to the
"Dress for Success" doctrine?

Is anyone using the 300D working with customers?

Thanks for your advice!


Charlie Self 12-10-2003 02:17 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 

>Looking forward: I still mostly enjoy artistic photography, but I would
>like to make some money. I have some ideas I want to explore in
>commercial photography. The problem that I have is that I don't a
>"professional looking" camera. I wanted to buy a Canon 10D, but I've been
>told they are all on back order around here.


So, B&H has them in stock: 3-4 days, and it's in your hands.

Charlie Self

"In the final choice a soldier's pack is not so heavy as a prisoner's chains."
Dwight D. Eisenhower























12-10-2003 03:09 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
Just because it isn't black? This may be an issue for some studio work where
you need to avoid reflections, but the color of the camera doesn't mean it
takes better pictures.

There are plenty of people who would have you believe that the 10D isn't up
to pro standards.

It's the pictures that do the talking.


"Michael" <michaelmfl@NOSPAMFORME.yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Xns944D568789276michaelmflyahoocom@24.25.9.42 ...
> The Past: My photography teacher in college 25 years ago had the nastiest
> looking, most basic Pentax 35mm SLR I ever saw. He was a really good
> photographer. He and I both shot artistic photographs. One day he asked
> me if money was important to me because there wasn't a lot of money in
> the art field. Soon after I was in Engineering school and a few years
> later I became a software engineer. My camera sat in the closet for a
> long time. Lots of regrets, but no sense in looking back.
>
> The Present: Well, I grew up to be a software design manager. I made good
> money for a lot of years, but then I got laid off. I have a Canon G2 that
> I brought to Italy earlier this year, and I took some great photographs.
> But the more I use the camera, the more I miss the control that I had
> with my Minolta SRT 102. I love digital photography. I don't miss sitting
> in the darkroom swishing chemicals around.
>
> Looking forward: I still mostly enjoy artistic photography, but I would
> like to make some money. I have some ideas I want to explore in
> commercial photography. The problem that I have is that I don't a
> "professional looking" camera. I wanted to buy a Canon 10D, but I've been
> told they are all on back order around here. The 300D is cheaper, and
> would probably be OK feature-wise, but I don't think it looks
> professional enough.
>
> Am I being too much of a fashion snob, or is there any truth to the
> "Dress for Success" doctrine?
>
> Is anyone using the 300D working with customers?
>
> Thanks for your advice!
>




DS 12-10-2003 07:10 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
> Looking forward: I still mostly enjoy artistic photography, but I would
> like to make some money. I have some ideas I want to explore in
> commercial photography. The problem that I have is that I don't a
> "professional looking" camera. I wanted to buy a Canon 10D, but I've been
> told they are all on back order around here. The 300D is cheaper, and
> would probably be OK feature-wise, but I don't think it looks
> professional enough.
>
> Am I being too much of a fashion snob, or is there any truth to the
> "Dress for Success" doctrine?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
I once worked at a camera store that was actually just a counter in a
sporting goods store. Favorite customer story is the fellow who wanted to
hang different cameras around his neck, check himself out in the full length
mirror that was next to my counter to see how the cameras looked on him.

Sounds like you.

DS



Tom Nelson 12-10-2003 08:34 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
In article <%cKBb.2635$UF1.2285@nwrddc02.gnilink.net>, DS
<spam_me_not@buzz_off.jerk> wrote:

> I once worked at a camera store that was actually just a counter in a
> sporting goods store. Favorite customer story is the fellow who wanted to
> hang different cameras around his neck, check himself out in the full length
> mirror that was next to my counter to see how the cameras looked on him.
>
> Sounds like you.


That's a low blow. As is the other comment that the 10D isn't a
"professional" camera. In truth, the commercial photography market is
very competitive, and your customers are going to judge you, as a new
shooter, on a number of factors. Number one, by a wide margin, is your
portfolio. They're not even going to SEE your camera until they hire
you. If you do a good job for them, they won't care what you use.

Tom Nelson
Tom Nelson Photography

Michael Quack 12-10-2003 09:13 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
In article <Xns944D568789276michaelmflyahoocom@24.25.9.42>,
Michael says...

> Am I being too much of a fashion snob, or is
> there any truth to the "Dress for Success" doctrine?


Fools look at the camera. Pros look at your pictures.
Have pictures handy to show around. Best dress possible.

--
Michael Quack <michael@photoquack.de>

http://www.photoquack.de/glamour/1.htm
http://www.photoquack.de/fashion/1.htm

Michael 12-10-2003 09:28 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
Tom Nelson <ludibund@xintegraonline.com.invalid> wrote in
news:101220031434561158%ludibund@xintegraonline.co m.invalid:

> In article <%cKBb.2635$UF1.2285@nwrddc02.gnilink.net>, DS
> <spam_me_not@buzz_off.jerk> wrote:
>
>> wanted to hang different cameras around his neck, check himself out
>> in the full length mirror that was next to my counter to see how the
>> cameras looked on him.
>>
>> Sounds like you.

>
> shooter, on a number of factors. Number one, by a wide margin, is your
> portfolio. They're not even going to SEE your camera until they hire
> you. If you do a good job for them, they won't care what you use.
>
> Tom Nelson
> Tom Nelson Photography
>


Ah, constructive advice. A rarity sometimes these days. Thank you.

Maybe it wasn't clear, but in my original post I wanted to know if
potential customers expect to see professional equipment. My current
equipment is not professional, but the quality it provides should be
adequate for some work.

Currently my look is not a great concern of mine. My camera bag is a 25
year old canvas back pack with a cut up camera bag sewn into the inside
of it to hold lenses, etc. My Minolta has stickers on it from rock album
covers, and it has a safety pin holding the camera strap on. I even
scratched off "Canon" from my Canon strap because I thought it was
pretentious. But I would like a new camera to do commercial work. I like
Canon and I have been considering getting the 300D, but I am willing to
make the jump to the 10D if it will help to bring in potential customers.




Michael Quack 12-10-2003 10:07 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
In article <Xns944DA7BB8A39Dmichaelmflyahoocom@24.25.9.43>,
Michael says...

> > shooter, on a number of factors. Number one, by a wide margin, is your
> > portfolio. They're not even going to SEE your camera until they hire
> > you. If you do a good job for them, they won't care what you use.


Right. I had a client who demanded that I give him
4x5" slides. For several reasons 35 mm was the
much more reasonable platform. So I shot on Kodak
Ektar 25 (sadly so discontinued) and printed on
Vericolor print film - 4x5".

When he received the slides he held them up, showed
them to almost everybody in the company and claimed
that there was no way to do it that good on 35mm.

Weeks later I told him the truth over a glass of wine.

He was shocked, thought for a while, and then told me
to raise my fee 20% for the future jobs with him,
and promised never ever again to tell me what my
tool should be.

--
Michael Quack <michael@photoquack.de>

http://www.photoquack.de/glamour/1.htm
http://www.photoquack.de/fashion/1.htm

gilbert grape 12-10-2003 10:35 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
Just an aside- I was walking in a park in New Jersey with my 10D and the
lens hood affixed to the 28-135 USM lens and within the course of 20
minutes, three folks (all with dogs incidentally) approached me to ask if I
was a "professional" photographer. (My guess is they wanted to set up for
portraits of their pets). So I think that certain cameras do exude an air
of professionalism that lends to the customers overall experience. (By the
way, I am no where near professional, and declined their advances). Of
course, walking around with something to professional looking also has its
downside, depending on the neighborhood you are shooting in.


"Michael" <michaelmfl@nospamforme.yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Xns944DA7BB8A39Dmichaelmflyahoocom@24.25.9.43 ...
> Tom Nelson <ludibund@xintegraonline.com.invalid> wrote in
> news:101220031434561158%ludibund@xintegraonline.co m.invalid:
>
> > In article <%cKBb.2635$UF1.2285@nwrddc02.gnilink.net>, DS
> > <spam_me_not@buzz_off.jerk> wrote:
> >
> >> wanted to hang different cameras around his neck, check himself out
> >> in the full length mirror that was next to my counter to see how the
> >> cameras looked on him.
> >>
> >> Sounds like you.

> >
> > shooter, on a number of factors. Number one, by a wide margin, is your
> > portfolio. They're not even going to SEE your camera until they hire
> > you. If you do a good job for them, they won't care what you use.
> >
> > Tom Nelson
> > Tom Nelson Photography
> >

>
> Ah, constructive advice. A rarity sometimes these days. Thank you.
>
> Maybe it wasn't clear, but in my original post I wanted to know if
> potential customers expect to see professional equipment. My current
> equipment is not professional, but the quality it provides should be
> adequate for some work.
>
> Currently my look is not a great concern of mine. My camera bag is a 25
> year old canvas back pack with a cut up camera bag sewn into the inside
> of it to hold lenses, etc. My Minolta has stickers on it from rock album
> covers, and it has a safety pin holding the camera strap on. I even
> scratched off "Canon" from my Canon strap because I thought it was
> pretentious. But I would like a new camera to do commercial work. I like
> Canon and I have been considering getting the 300D, but I am willing to
> make the jump to the 10D if it will help to bring in potential customers.
>
>
>




Ron Hunter 12-10-2003 10:40 PM

Re: Dress for Success???
 
Michael wrote:

> The Past: My photography teacher in college 25 years ago had the nastiest
> looking, most basic Pentax 35mm SLR I ever saw. He was a really good
> photographer. He and I both shot artistic photographs. One day he asked
> me if money was important to me because there wasn't a lot of money in
> the art field. Soon after I was in Engineering school and a few years
> later I became a software engineer. My camera sat in the closet for a
> long time. Lots of regrets, but no sense in looking back.
>
> The Present: Well, I grew up to be a software design manager. I made good
> money for a lot of years, but then I got laid off. I have a Canon G2 that
> I brought to Italy earlier this year, and I took some great photographs.
> But the more I use the camera, the more I miss the control that I had
> with my Minolta SRT 102. I love digital photography. I don't miss sitting
> in the darkroom swishing chemicals around.
>
> Looking forward: I still mostly enjoy artistic photography, but I would
> like to make some money. I have some ideas I want to explore in
> commercial photography. The problem that I have is that I don't a
> "professional looking" camera. I wanted to buy a Canon 10D, but I've been
> told they are all on back order around here. The 300D is cheaper, and
> would probably be OK feature-wise, but I don't think it looks
> professional enough.
>
> Am I being too much of a fashion snob, or is there any truth to the
> "Dress for Success" doctrine?
>
> Is anyone using the 300D working with customers?
>
> Thanks for your advice!
>


I should think that you should be more focused on the product than the
tool. If you take a good picture, no one will care if you used a
%15,000 professional camera or a pin-hole camera. Much of photography
is in the artistic aspects, assuming the camera is adequate to the task
at hand. Go with function.


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