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Phil Partridge 12-05-2005 07:27 PM

Numbering Q
 
All,

I have looked...

Is there an equivalent to an STD code book for SIP ID's?
Can it be said that 6441nnnn is provider X, and 7441nnnn is provider Y?

Or do you have to work from the 'other end', and find who has the number
range from which your NGN's have been provided?

Or is it all such a mess, that you don't stand a cat in hells chance of
finding who the back-end provider is?

TIA,
Philip Partridge

Jono 12-05-2005 08:23 PM

Re: Numbering Q
 


Phil Partridge wrote:
|| All,
||
|| I have looked...
||
|| Is there an equivalent to an STD code book for SIP ID's?
|| Can it be said that 6441nnnn is provider X, and 7441nnnn is provider Y?
||
|| Or do you have to work from the 'other end', and find who has the
|| number range from which your NGN's have been provided?
||
|| Or is it all such a mess, that you don't stand a cat in hells chance of
|| finding who the back-end provider is?
||
|| TIA,
|| Philip Partridge

Your SIP ID has nothing to do with any provider, other than the one who
provides you with it - they do not clash with one another - 123456 could be
issued by ProviderA & ProviderB - as they work like email addresses ie,
sip:123456@ProviderA is different from sip:123456@ProviderB

Obviously, if your question relates to the Geographic number your provider
{may} provide, then one starting point would be the Oftel site - they
maintain a list of number ranges & who they're allocated to. Unfortunately,
narrow ranges often show up as "assigned to various" (or something like
that)

I think it's just Sipgate that, (for the most part) the SIP ID is the last 7
digits of your 11 digit geographic (not NGN) number.



Ivor Jones 12-05-2005 08:32 PM

Re: Numbering Q
 


"Jono" <no@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:%k1lf.3150$iz3.1749@text.news.blueyonder.co.u k

[snip]

> Your SIP ID has nothing to do with any provider, other
> than the one who provides you with it - they do not clash
> with one another - 123456 could be issued by ProviderA &
> ProviderB - as they work like email addresses ie,
> sip:123456@ProviderA is different from
> sip:123456@ProviderB
> Obviously, if your question relates to the Geographic
> number your provider {may} provide, then one starting
> point would be the Oftel site - they maintain a list of
> number ranges & who they're allocated to. Unfortunately,
> narrow ranges often show up as "assigned to various" (or
> something like that)
> I think it's just Sipgate that, (for the most part) the
> SIP ID is the last 7 digits of your 11 digit geographic
> (not NGN) number.


Not always, and not if you change PSTN numbers, as you can freely do on
Sipgate. The 7 digit SIP ID will always stay the same unless you close the
account and open a new one.

BTW most (not all) geo numbers for VoIP in the UK are allocated by
Magrathea.

Ivor



Ivor Jones 12-05-2005 08:36 PM

Re: Numbering Q
 


"Phil Partridge" <philp@pebble.demon.co.uk> wrote in
message news:aT9p9BAbSJlDFwNI@pebble.demon.co.uk
> All,
>
> I have looked...
>
> Is there an equivalent to an STD code book for SIP ID's?
> Can it be said that 6441nnnn is provider X, and 7441nnnn
> is provider Y?
>
> Or do you have to work from the 'other end', and find who
> has the number range from which your NGN's have been
> provided?
>
> Or is it all such a mess, that you don't stand a cat in
> hells chance of finding who the back-end provider is?
>
> TIA,
> Philip Partridge


I don't understand your question. Are you trying to identify which VoIP
provider issued a specific geographic number, or are you asking if a 7
digit SIP ID range is specific to one provider or other..?

Geographic PSTN numbers are issued by providers in several ranges and may
or may not correspond to the associated SIP ID. Sipgate's PSTN numbers are
usually (but by no means always) the same as the last 7 digits of the PSTN
number, I can't speak for other providers.

Ivor



Jono 12-05-2005 09:00 PM

Re: Numbering Q
 


Ivor Jones wrote:
|| "Jono" <no@nospamblueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
|| news:%k1lf.3150$iz3.1749@text.news.blueyonder.co.u k
||
|| [snip]
||
||| Your SIP ID has nothing to do with any provider, other
||| than the one who provides you with it - they do not clash
||| with one another - 123456 could be issued by ProviderA &
||| ProviderB - as they work like email addresses ie,
||| sip:123456@ProviderA is different from
||| sip:123456@ProviderB
||| Obviously, if your question relates to the Geographic
||| number your provider {may} provide, then one starting
||| point would be the Oftel site - they maintain a list of
||| number ranges & who they're allocated to. Unfortunately,
||| narrow ranges often show up as "assigned to various" (or
||| something like that)
||| I think it's just Sipgate that, (for the most part) the
||| SIP ID is the last 7 digits of your 11 digit geographic
||| (not NGN) number.
||
|| Not always, and not if you change PSTN numbers, as you can freely do on
|| Sipgate. The 7 digit SIP ID will always stay the same unless you close
|| the account and open a new one.
||
|| BTW most (not all) geo numbers for VoIP in the UK are allocated by
|| Magrathea.
||
|| Ivor

That's why I said "for the most part" ! ;-)



Phil Partridge 12-06-2005 12:50 AM

Re: Numbering Q
 
In article <3vjmmeF169qhlU1@individual.net>, Ivor Jones
<ivor@despammed.invalid> writes
>
>
>"Phil Partridge" <philp@pebble.demon.co.uk> wrote in
>message news:aT9p9BAbSJlDFwNI@pebble.demon.co.uk
>> All,
>>
>> I have looked...
>>
>> Is there an equivalent to an STD code book for SIP ID's?
>> Can it be said that 6441nnnn is provider X, and 7441nnnn
>> is provider Y?
>>
>> Or do you have to work from the 'other end', and find who
>> has the number range from which your NGN's have been
>> provided?
>>
>> Or is it all such a mess, that you don't stand a cat in
>> hells chance of finding who the back-end provider is?
>>
>> TIA,
>> Philip Partridge

>
>I don't understand your question. Are you trying to identify which VoIP
>provider issued a specific geographic number, or are you asking if a 7
>digit SIP ID range is specific to one provider or other..?


I wanted to get from 74410500 (say) to a provider.

A client of mine has gone 'IP' for a site. - Only six phones.
The 'provider' my client deals with is a 'bandwidth reseller' (for want
of a better term. They have supplied ADSL from an ISP. - Again they
resell a package, or so it seems.
I am not sure whether the ISP is the IP telephony provider, or whether
they are reselling from yet someone else.
The bandwidth reseller does not want me to know who the backend provider
is. - Presumably thinks I might try to cut them out.
Personally, I am not interested from that point of view. I was hoping to
find more info from trawling the providers website.
If you saw the other thread, you will know the provider has been having
trouble configuring whatever it is this lot connects back to.
I now think it very possible the ISP is the backend provider. there
website is pretty sketchy, as is my perception of their knowledge of how
to configure their end.

Don't get me wrong, I couldn't have done it. But I wasn't being paid to
either!

This has been my first 'proper' foray into IP telephony.
I have been impressed by the voice quality of the connections I have
managed to make. - That is when a two-way conversation has been
possible.
Perhaps the person who knows how to do it has had some time off? ;-)
Still the client has been 'upgraded' from Grandstream to Snom at 'no
cost'.

Oh, and the Linksys router died over the weekend. Only out the box and
powered up last Thursday. :-(

>
>Geographic PSTN numbers are issued by providers in several ranges and may
>or may not correspond to the associated SIP ID. Sipgate's PSTN numbers are
>usually (but by no means always) the same as the last 7 digits of the PSTN
>number, I can't speak for other providers.
>
>Ivor
>
>


Philip Partridge

Peter 12-06-2005 11:13 AM

Re: Numbering Q
 
Phil Partridge <philp@pebbleGRIT.demon.co.uk> wrote:
[...]
> I wanted to get from 74410500 (say) to a provider.


There's not enough context to know.

If I dial it from my landline, I will get a different result than if I
call from a phone in London or Birmingham. Likewise, it may mean
something to Sipgate or Gradwell, or whoever.

To make sense of the number, you need to know where it is intended to
be diallet from, or have it in a commonly-recognised format such as a
full UK or international PSTN number.

--
To refuse awards is another way of accepting them with more noise than is
normal.
- Sir Peter Ustinov

Ian 12-10-2005 07:28 PM

Re: Numbering Q
 

"Phil Partridge" <philp@pebble.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:gKnBIDAEBOlDFwb$@pebble.demon.co.uk...
> In article <3vjmmeF169qhlU1@individual.net>, Ivor Jones
> <ivor@despammed.invalid> writes
> >
> >
> >"Phil Partridge" <philp@pebble.demon.co.uk> wrote in
> >message news:aT9p9BAbSJlDFwNI@pebble.demon.co.uk
> >> All,
> >>
> >> I have looked...
> >>
> >> Is there an equivalent to an STD code book for SIP ID's?
> >> Can it be said that 6441nnnn is provider X, and 7441nnnn
> >> is provider Y?
> >>
> >> Or do you have to work from the 'other end', and find who
> >> has the number range from which your NGN's have been
> >> provided?
> >>
> >> Or is it all such a mess, that you don't stand a cat in
> >> hells chance of finding who the back-end provider is?
> >>
> >> TIA,
> >> Philip Partridge

> >
> >I don't understand your question. Are you trying to identify which VoIP
> >provider issued a specific geographic number, or are you asking if a 7
> >digit SIP ID range is specific to one provider or other..?

>
> I wanted to get from 74410500 (say) to a provider.
>
> A client of mine has gone 'IP' for a site. - Only six phones.
> The 'provider' my client deals with is a 'bandwidth reseller' (for want
> of a better term. They have supplied ADSL from an ISP. - Again they
> resell a package, or so it seems.
> I am not sure whether the ISP is the IP telephony provider, or whether
> they are reselling from yet someone else.
> The bandwidth reseller does not want me to know who the backend provider
> is. - Presumably thinks I might try to cut them out.
> Personally, I am not interested from that point of view. I was hoping to
> find more info from trawling the providers website.
> If you saw the other thread, you will know the provider has been having
> trouble configuring whatever it is this lot connects back to.
> I now think it very possible the ISP is the backend provider. there
> website is pretty sketchy, as is my perception of their knowledge of how
> to configure their end.
>
> Don't get me wrong, I couldn't have done it. But I wasn't being paid to
> either!
>
> This has been my first 'proper' foray into IP telephony.
> I have been impressed by the voice quality of the connections I have
> managed to make. - That is when a two-way conversation has been
> possible.
> Perhaps the person who knows how to do it has had some time off? ;-)
> Still the client has been 'upgraded' from Grandstream to Snom at 'no
> cost'.
>
> Oh, and the Linksys router died over the weekend. Only out the box and
> powered up last Thursday. :-(
>
> >
> >Geographic PSTN numbers are issued by providers in several ranges and may
> >or may not correspond to the associated SIP ID. Sipgate's PSTN numbers

are
> >usually (but by no means always) the same as the last 7 digits of the

PSTN
> >number, I can't speak for other providers.
> >


Basicly, in the near future this wont matter as the majority of suppliers
are going to be using and enum lookup, you wont need to worry, Now its to be
seen if suppliers will pass the the foc is another matter,Test earlier this
year showed that some arnt. I have a PSTN number that is registered in the
enum databases as a sip number, So in theory if called from an IP phone with
a supplier using enum lookup it will be delivered to the IP number, now some
suppliers i tried this delivered it to the PSTN so obviously didnt use enum
some delivered it foc to IP number and some charged to deliver it to the IP
number.

Your pstn number is only mapped to your sip uri, and as such is litle
diferent to the way NGNs are mapped to GNs

Ian






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