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Sam 11-02-2004 08:20 PM

Broadband ?
 
Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone line is
any slower than on the main line?

Thanks

Sam



staple 11-02-2004 08:49 PM

Re: Broadband ?
 

"Sam" <No_Spam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:cm8q69$lh0$2@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone line is
> any slower than on the main line?
>
> Thanks
>
> Sam
>
>


DSL is DSL, bandwidth depends on the physical distance to the switch or
repeater.



Lady Chatterly 11-03-2004 04:38 AM

Re: More 24hourfuckup.idiotdesk stupidity...
 
In article <5bdc5388a7d14de586d2069ace5906b2@news-text.bhandari.pvt.np> kadbitcha <nospam@rainx.cjb.net> wrote:
>
>David Hemingsley, <d.hemingsley@btinternet.com>, the brooding, wriggly
>pervert, and street sweeper, ruptured:
>
>> yes it is

>
>BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAH!!!!!


It is good to see you know your place.

>****ing pathetic. And the following post as well... The ****ing OP just
>wants to use a ****ing extension line, you stupid *****.


Are you sure about that?

--
Lady Chatterly

"Getting your ass kicked again I see. Lady C is quickly becomeing my
hero." -- Crawdad


David Hemingsley 11-03-2004 05:21 AM

Re: Broadband ?
 
yes it is
"staple" <someone@your.house> wrote in message
news:_4qdnTfTWIzCbxrcRVn-gQ@midco.net...
>
> "Sam" <No_Spam@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:cm8q69$lh0$2@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
>> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone line is
>> any slower than on the main line?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Sam
>>
>>

>
> DSL is DSL, bandwidth depends on the physical distance to the switch or
> repeater.
>




Real Friendly Neighborhood Vote Ranger 11-03-2004 11:06 PM

Re: More 24hourfuckup.idiotdesk stupidity...
 

"Fred" <~@~.com> wrote in message
news:79a2494b5b274ae7b2ce9d8e26080047@fe.40usenets erver.com...
> Lady Chatterly wrote:
>
> > It is good to see you know your place.

>
> I'm dangerous Dan McGrew.
> > >On you knees frag!

>
> > Are you sure about that?

>
> None of your ****ing business.
> > >Wow wow wow! I'll assure you a burning ride
> > >on Usenet!

>




Fred 11-04-2004 01:43 AM

Re: More 24hourfuckup.idiotdesk stupidity...
 
Lady Chatterly wrote:

> It is good to see you know your place.


I'm dangerous Dan McGrew.

> Are you sure about that?


None of your ****ing business.



Robert Baer 11-04-2004 09:03 AM

Re: Broadband ?
 
> >> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
> >> line is any slower than on the main line?


"Broadband" is the term used for *cable*; telephone lines use *DSL*.
In either case, there is no speed difference, unless (for a phone
line) there is a filter between the source (telco) and the DSL modem.
If you insist on putting two or more DSL modems on one phone line, you
should ger eXplicit instructuions concerning extra hardware.

Lady Chatterly 11-04-2004 09:04 AM

Re: Broadband ?
 
In article <7c90d8d3d8ca48e9b4d1ee79384f15a1@news-text.bhandari.pvt.np> kadbitcha <nospam@rainx.cjb.net> wrote:
>
>Robert Baer, <robertbaer@earthlink.net>, the self-righteous, stilted
>headache, and tapster in the ale house, objected:
>
>>>>> Hi, Does anyone know if using broadband on an entension telephone
>>>>> line is any slower than on the main line?

>>
>> "Broadband" is the term used for *cable*; telephone lines use *DSL*.

>
>BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!


Anyone with any good sites for research and help.

--
Lady Chatterly

"This isn't being generated by a human is it?" -- Meat-->Plow



G. Morgan 11-04-2004 09:23 AM

Re: Broadband ?
 
On 4 Nov 2004 09:20:47 GMT "Chloroflexus Aemulus Gambiensis"
used 15 lines of text to write in newsgroup: 24hoursupport.helpdesk

>Oh your what?


Shouldn't you be pointing a bone and singing at someone? BWAHAHAHAHA


--
-Graham

Remove the 'snails' from my email

Pterynotus Quinii Triatominarum Sequivirus 11-04-2004 09:28 AM

Re: Broadband ?
 
G. Morgan wrote:
> On 4 Nov 2004 09:20:47 GMT "Chloroflexus Aemulus Gambiensis"
> used 15 lines of text to write in newsgroup: 24hoursupport.helpdesk
>
>> Oh your what?

>
> Shouldn't you be pointing a bone and singing at someone? BWAHAHAHAHA


Pick a bone...

A transmission facility having a bandwidth sufficient to carry multiple
voice, video or data channels simultaneously. Each channel occupies (is
modulated to) a different frequency bandwidth on the transmission medium and
is demodulated to its original frequency at the receiving end. Channels are
separated by žguardbandsÓ (empty spaces) to ensure that each channel wonŪt
interfere with its neighboring channels.
www.rvcomp.com/wiring/EIA/glossary.htm


A transmission facility having a bandwidth sufficient to carry multiple
voice, video or data channels simultaneously. Each channel occupies (is
modulated to) a different frequency bandwidth on the transmission medium and
is demodulated to its original frequency at the receiving end. Channels are
separated by "guardbands" (empty spaces) to ensure that each channel will
not interfere with its neighboring channels. This technique is used to
provide many CATV channels on one coaxial cable. 10Broad36 is the only
broadband Ethernet media type. All other Ethernet media types are
"baseband".
http://www.femf.org/education/Summit...ttglossary.htm


A transmission medium capable of supporting a wide range of frequencies;
can carry multiple signals by dividing the total capacity of the medium into
multiple, independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates only
on a specific range of frequencies; used originally to describe a channel
with more bandwidth than a standard 48 KHz voice grade channel.
www.arraycomm.com/glossary.html


A transmission facility having a bandwidth sufficient to carry multiple
voice, video or data channels simultaneously. Each channel occupies (is
modulated to) a different frequency bandwidth on the transmission medium and
is demodulated to its original frequency at the receiving end. Channels are
separated by "guardbands" (empty spaces) to ensure that each channel will
not interfere with its neighboring channels.
http://www.techfest.com/networking/c.../cableglos.htm


High-capacity high-speed, transmission channel carried on coaxial or
fiber-optic cables with a wider bandwidth than conventional copper telephone
lines. Broadband channels can carry video, voice, and data simultaneously.
www.c-b.com/industryinfo/glossaries/telecom.asp


The provision of multiple channels of information, over a single link
which supports high speed through-put of data, typically using some form of
frequency or wave-division multiplexing. The information could consist of
voice, video or computer data See Also: DSL, Mbps Go to top
http://www.easynet.com/investorinfo/...o_glossary.asp


A type of transmission that shares the bandwidth of a medium--such as
copper or fiber optic cable--to carry more than one signal. Broadband
facilities have a bandwidth (capacity) greater than a voice grade line of 3
kHz. Such a broadband facility--typically coaxial cable--may carry numerous
voice, video and data channels simultaneously. Each "channel" will take up a
different frequency on the cable. "Guardbands" (empty spaces) exist between
the channels to make sure that each channel does not interfere with its
neighbor.
http://www.intersil.com/design/comml...sary/index.asp


A communication network in which the bandwidth can be divided and shared
by multiple simultaneous signals (voice, data, video). The network can carry
multiple signals by dividing the total capacity of the medium into multiple,
independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates only on a
specific range of frequencies.
www.bcdforum.org/public/library/glossary.html


A transmission method in which the networks range of transmission
frequencies is divided into separate channels and each channel is used to
send a different signal. Broadband is often used to send different types of
signals simultaneously.
www.ircbeginner.com/opvinfo/webglossary.html


A data transmission technique allowing multiple high-speed signals to
share the bandwidth of a single cable via frequency division multiplexing.
www.lantronix.com/learning/glossary/


A transmission method that uses a bandwidth greater than a voice-grade
channel's, and potentially capable of much higher transmission rates; also
called wideband. In broadcast transmission, multiple channels access a
medium (usually coaxial cable) that has a large bandwidth, using
radio-frequency modems. Each channel occupies (is modulated to) a different
frequency slot on the cable, and is demodulated to its original frequency at
the receiving end.
www.cxtec.com/corp/technical/net_gloss1.html


(1) Transmission facility having a bandwidth greater than 20kHz; capable
of high-speed data transmission. (2) Analog transmission technique used with
data and video transmissions that provides multiple channels for users
through frequency division multiplexing.
www.daleen.com/company/glossary.htm


Also referred to as wideband. A term describing any network that
multiplexes multiple, independent network carrier frequencies on to a single
cable. It allows multiple simultaneous "conversations", since the
independent networks operate on different frequencies and do not interfere
with each other. In LAN terminology, it refers to a system in which multiple
channels access a medium, for example co-axial cable, that has a large
bandwidth using Radio Frequency (RF) modems. This may allow the co-axial
cable to carry multiple separate LANs whose transmission is being modulated
at different frequencies.
www.accsystems.com/glossary.htm


This transmission medium allows transmission of voice, data, and video
simultaneously at rates of 1.544Mbps or higher. Broadband transmission media
generally can carry multiple channels - each at a different frequency or
specific time slot. BPS (Bits-Per-Second) A measurement of how fast data is
moved from one place to another. A 28.8 modem can move 28,800 bits per
second.
www.zoom.com/dsl/glossary1.html


A term used to compare frequency bandwidth relative to 3 MHz narrowband
frequencies. Broadband frequencies can transmit more data and at a higher
speed than narrowband frequencies. In general, typical paging services
utilise narrowband frequencies. Wireless phones and communication devices
use broadband. Back to the top.
www.telestial.com/glossary.htm


Communication channels that are capable of carrying a wide range of
frequencies. Broadcast television, cable television, microwave, and
satellite are examples of broadband technologies. These technologies are
capable of carrying a great deal of information in a short amount of time,
but are more expensive to use than technologies like the telephone, which
require less bandwidth. (Novak)
citl.tamu.edu/citl-glossary-main.htm


1. A type of communications channel capable of carrying a large portion of
the electromagnetic spectrum. A broadband channel can accommodate the
following media: audio, digital, and television. 2. A transmission facility
having a bandwidth greater than 20 kHz capable of high speed data
transmission. 3. An analog transmission technique used with data and video
transmissions that provides multiple user channels through
frequency-division multiplexing (FDM). See FDM.
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/...ce/evbugl4.htm


1. Transmission system that multiplexes multiple independent signals onto
one cable. 2. Telecommunications terminology: Any channel having a bandwidth
greater than a voice-grade channel (4 kHz). 3. LAN terminology: A coaxial
cable on which analog signaling is used. Also called wideband.
www.zworld.com/documentation/glossary/intro.html


A transmission medium or channel that has a wider bandwidth than one voice
channel (with a carrier wave of a certain modulated frequency). It allows
multiple services like voice, data, video, etc. to transit over the network.
support.airmail.net/faq/dslglossary.php


A general term for different types of high-speed, high-bandwidth
connections to the Internet, including DSL and cable. Back to Top
support.sbcglobal.net/general/662.shtml


High-speed transmission. The term is used to define the speed of
communication lines or services and most commonly refers to T1 (1.544
Mbit/s) rates or better, even though the actual rate may be much lower or
higher, depending on the application.
www.axis.com/corporate/corp/glossary_general.htm


A transmission medium that can transmit large volumes of data in many
frequencies. Use of broadband makes it possible to send quickly large data
objects (such as movies, music, and games) using communication lines such as
ADSL or CATV. It is usually charged at a flat rate and constant Internet
access is possible.
xml.fujitsu.com/en/terms/


A service or system requiring transmission channels capable of supporting
rates greater than the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) primary
rate.
www.marconi.com/html/glossary/glossaryb.htm


A transmission medium capable of supporting a wide range of frequencies.
It can carry multiple signals by dividing the total capacity of the medium
into multiple, independent bandwidth channels, where each channel operates
only on a specific range of frequencies. See also: baseband. [Source:
RFC1392]
www.jnug.ac.uk/netglossary.html


Denotes transmission facilities capable of handling frequencies required
for high-grade communications. Broadband infers the use of carrier signals
as opposed to direct modulation. Characteristically used for simultaneous
multi-channel transmission.
www.networkcables.com/b.htm


of or relating to or being a communications network in which the bandwidth
can be divided and shared by multiple simultaneous signals (as for voice or
data or video)
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn


responding to or operating at a wide band of frequencies; "a broadband
antenna"
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn




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