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asj 07-29-2003 04:32 PM

Blowing the doors to Palm - Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
All Palm Tungstens will now ship with the JVM (Java Virtual Machine),
which means that Java programmers can now write directly to these
handhelds (with no need to download the jvm - an annoying and
debilitating thing when you want to easily reach end-users).

Because of IBM and Palm's new alliance to extend and solidify Palm's
dominance in the enterprise, it is essential for developers (whether
java, palm, or other) to see what opportunities might be lurking behind
these events.

For Java programmers, Why write to Palms?
http://www.blueboard.com/j2me/stats.htm#palm
http://www.blueboard.com/j2me/why.htm#pda

For Palm programmers, what's Java's J2ME? Why should I write in J2ME?
http://www.blueboard.com/j2me/intro.htm
http://www.blueboard.com/j2me/why.htm

today's headlines:
http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupda...914374,00.html

--------------------------------------------------------

In one of the first moves to demonstrate that Palm Solutions Group (the
hardware guys) and operating-system spinout PalmSource (the software
guys) are two autonomous companies, Palm Solutions Group (PSG) has
announced that it will be making a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) available
for all of its Tungsten handheld offerings: the Bluetooth-enabled "T,"
the wireless wide area network-enabled "W," and the Wi-Fi enabled "C."

The change in strategy also affects the T2, a successor to the Tungsten
T that was launched last week.

The reason this announcement demonstrates the autonomy between the two
formerly married organizations is that PalmSource is so far content to
live without Java. For Palm users, however, including a JVM means access
to more enterprise, and consumer, applications.

PalmSourceCEO David Nagel has repeatedly insisted that the Palm OS
ecosystem can continue to thrive and grow without including a JVM as a
standard component.

In a recent interview, Nagel told me he had no problem with providing
both development environments --- Palm OS and Java --- to developers.
"But Sun is very difficult to work with," said Nagel. "They do not make
it easy. We were one of the early members of the JCP [Java Community
Process]. We tried to build a PDA profile, sort of a Java 2 Micro
Edition (the mobile JVM) grown up a little bit. But we decided that was
sort of a bifurcation, and that it created more problems than it solved.
Sun didn't like it. They wouldn't support it, so we decided that we
weren't going to go through with it and that we would leave J2ME be." In
light of that, Nagel is content with the 19,000 applications he says are
available for the Palm OS (up from 12,500 from last year) and the
280,000 developers.

But PSG director of strategic alliances Chris Morgan wasn't satisfied.
In June, he struck a deal with IBM to include that company's version of
J2ME, known as WebSphere Micro Edition (WME, formerly known as "J9"), in
all Tungstens moving forward. The move means that PSG now gets to tap
into both the Palm OS and Java ecosystems, the latter weighing in at 3
million developers and growing. According to Morgan, "The way I look at
is, we now have 3,280,000 developers."

To the extent that developers are one of the three lynchpins (in
addition to applications and users/installations) to most ecosystems in
our industry, the Tungsten ecosystem appears to have gotten a
significant boost. For PSG, this is a smart move, particularly because
the Tungstens haven't been doing as well as the company had originally
hoped they would..

This is good news for Java developers, too. Prior to the announcement,
Java developers had limited access to the Palm market. If they wanted
their applications to run on the Palm OS, their only choice was to
redevelop their applications natively for the Palm platform, or to get
their target customers to buy, install, and configure a JVM from a third
party like Insignia. With this announcement, the "anywhere" part of the
Java promise --- the ability to write software once and deploy it
anywhere --- is closer to reality. The target for Java developers will
grow by the number of Tungstens that are in the market.

username 07-29-2003 07:18 PM

Re: Blowing the doors to Palm - Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
<just another java rambling by asj deleted>

removed microsoft.public.pocketpc from the crosspostinglist, as this posting
is irrelevant to that newsgroup



Brandon Blackmoor 07-29-2003 11:01 PM

Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
"RaBi" <egal@mirdochegal.com> wrote:
>
> Nevertheless I consider this a good news - I
> am a Java guy and have been waiting for this


Waiting for the announcement, or waiting for Palm to follow through
with it? Palm has made that same announcement almost word for word at
every JavaOne conference since the late 1990's.

I'm not holding my breath.


William P.N. Smith 07-30-2003 01:07 AM

Re: Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
Where would one find info on Java in general and this particular "In
June, he struck a deal with IBM to include that company's version of
J2ME, known as WebSphere Micro Edition (WME, formerly known as "J9"),
in all Tungstens moving forward." version of it?

Is Java very difficult, compared to C, Perl, etc?

--
William Smith wpns@compusmiths.com N1JBJ@amsat.org
ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com

Ananda Sim 07-30-2003 03:09 AM

Re: Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
Hi

Thanks for that overview and references. Whilst we wait for J2ME for
PocketPC (I assume there is none), is it worth bothering playing with
alternatives like EWE?

Ananda

"asj" <k@xx.com> wrote in message news:3F272D51.7E06@xx.com...
> William P.N. Smith wrote:
> >
> > Where would one find info on Java in general and this particular "In
> > June, he struck a deal with IBM to include that company's version of
> > J2ME, known as WebSphere Micro Edition (WME, formerly known as "J9"),
> > in all Tungstens moving forward." version of it?
> >
> > Is Java very difficult, compared to C, Perl, etc?

>
>
> java is comparable to the "3Cs" (c/c#/c++) in difficulty.
>
> because the java platform is pervasive in servers and clients, by
> learning java, you will be able to extend your reach from servers
> (including mainframes), all the way down to smartphones, smartcards, and
> other small devices.
>
> it is divided into 3 areas:
> J2EE (Java 2 Enterprise Edition) - for programming on servers
> J2SE (Java 2 Standard Edition) - standard programming classes
> J2ME (Java 2 MicroEdition) - for programming wireless and other small
> devices.
>
> we are concerned here with j2me.
>
> Here's some tips on how to start on J2ME:
> http://www.blueboard.com/j2me/start.htm
>
> Site that focuses on current news and developer articles:
> http://www.blueboard.com/j2me/
>
> THE java site (run by Sun Microsystems):
> http://java.sun.com/
>
> J2ME:
> http://java.sun.com/j2me/
>
> IBM's Websphere Microedition toolsets:
> http://www-3.ibm.com/software/wireless/wsdd/
>
> If you want to run just the standard MIDP, you will need to download the
> MIDP toolkit:
> http://java.sun.com/products/j2mewto...nload-2_0.html




dennis m parrott 07-30-2003 04:06 AM

Re: Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
If you've programmed a bit in C++, Java isn't any stretch... Some feel that
the object model in Java is a little bit simpler than in C++.

Frankly, Java reminds me of a cross between Pascal or Modula and C with some
object-related sugar sprinkled on liberally.

dennis parrott

"William P.N. Smith" <wpns@compusmiths.com> wrote in message
news:jf6eivkjquilq2dvpgcem4hhlph3nue8nt@4ax.com...
> Where would one find info on Java in general and this particular "In
> June, he struck a deal with IBM to include that company's version of
> J2ME, known as WebSphere Micro Edition (WME, formerly known as "J9"),
> in all Tungstens moving forward." version of it?
>
> Is Java very difficult, compared to C, Perl, etc?
>
> --
> William Smith wpns@compusmiths.com N1JBJ@amsat.org
> ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com




Person 07-30-2003 04:59 AM

Re: Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
asj <asj@xzxx.com> wrote in message news:<3F2713E2.733F@xzxx.com>...
> Brandon Blackmoor wrote:
> >
> > "RaBi" <egal@mirdochegal.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > Nevertheless I consider this a good news - I
> > > am a Java guy and have been waiting for this

> >
> > Waiting for the announcement, or waiting for Palm to follow through
> > with it? Palm has made that same announcement almost word for word at
> > every JavaOne conference since the late 1990's.
> >
> > I'm not holding my breath.

>
>
> you don't need to....it'll be shipping by fall (unlike before, when
> announced shipping dates were nebulous at best).......this time, (1)
> it's IBM that made the joint announcement; (2) it's not Palm the
> handheld maker that is doing this, but the now-separate entity
> PalmSource; (3) PalmSource NEEDS IBM to gain more traction in the
> enterprise...you could say, Palm needs IBM (and Java) more than IBM
> needs Palm....


SuperWaba!
SuperWaba!
SuperWaba!
A VM for Java.
??? where you can dl. Chck Google.

Andreas Rueckert 07-30-2003 08:43 AM

Re: Blowing the doors to Palm - Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
On Tue, 29 Jul 2003 15:18:27 -0400, asj <k@xx.com> wrote:

--<snip>--

>> Yet the users of the many non-Tungsten PalmOS devices are out of reach. So
>> the market for Java on Palm is really limited outside of controlled
>> corporate environments.
>> I think it requires at least all Palm devices and Sonys to build a solid
>> market.

>
>
>take a look at J2ME...the market for smartphones in the consumer field
>is actually several times larger than that of handhelds and climbing
>fast (nearly 100 million java-enabled phones since last year)....J2ME
>will allow you to write to many smartphones AND now palm tungstens and
>other handhelds....


And you can do it with one codebase. I'm from the Java-Chess team
( http://www.java-chess.de ) and it took me less than 2 hrs to run the
J2ME version on POSE (emulating a 2MB(!) Palm M100). Most of this time
was spent adding the pointing device to our control layer. And those M100
are really cheap on eBay, so I might get me one just for fun.
Now if my midp4palm version would support PNG transparency it would look
somewhat better...

Ciao,
Andreas


RaBi 07-30-2003 12:08 PM

Re: Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 
"dennis m parrott" <dparrott@peoplepc.com> wrote in message
news:rvHVa.221196$BA.57372653@twister.columbus.rr. com...
> If you've programmed a bit in C++, Java isn't any stretch... Some feel

that
> the object model in Java is a little bit simpler than in C++.

ACK

Learning the Java language takes a couple of hours - a couple of days if you
want to know the details like static intializers, bit shifting, inner
classes, ...
Easy.

The hard part is in the APIs. There are so many APIs available that you can
learn Java 24/7 for the next year. And then start all over again because
most APIs have evolved in the meantime. Just think about all the nice
acronyms AWT, Swing, EJB, JDO, RMI, JavaMail, JMS, Servlets, JSP, JDBC, etc,
etc

Learning the Java language is like learning all characters between A and Z:
Very easy but without knowing words, grammatics and all that stuff that's
worth nothing...

I'm not discouraging you from learning Java but be prepared to learn a lot.
I've been working full time in Java for 6 years now and still busy
learning...

#rb



RaBi 07-30-2003 12:12 PM

Re: Java programming for Tungsten handhelds
 

"Brandon Blackmoor" <bblackmoor@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:13vdivk7a55c01icsgmmn62bpsflikqtum@4ax.com...
> Waiting for the announcement, or waiting for Palm to follow through
> with it? Palm has made that same announcement almost word for word at
> every JavaOne conference since the late 1990's.

Yes- I still have my good old Palm V bought a that JavaOne when they showed
us Java on it. Must have been '98 or '99.

But this time I think it's different. Big blue is much more reliable than
Sun when announcing that sort of stuff.


#rb




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