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ed collins 07-08-2003 02:01 PM

IDE favorite
 
I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP. What
is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?

Any and all replies would certainly be appreciated.

ed.




dada rara 07-08-2003 02:55 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
Agree on that, finding new useful features every day:

Wizards for creating many different types of files (java, jsp, xsl, xml, jar
etc etc)
Ant integration
CVS integration
XSL tag completion
XSLT
DB browser
WAR creation
JAR creation
"Automatic" JavaDoc
Internalisation help (property files)
Tag libraries support

much much more

One weak side when working with complex projects, no easy way of specifying
multiple build paths...

d.

"Eric Olander" <eolandersprint0@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:nOAOa.89507$Io.7801553@newsread2.prod.itd.ear thlink.net...
> I don't know if its the most popular, but the NetBeans IDE is good (and
> free). See www.netbeans.org.
>
> -Eric
>
> "ed collins" <emacduffie@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:Z8AOa.8335$N7.1053@sccrnsc03...
> > I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP.

What
> > is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?
> >
> > Any and all replies would certainly be appreciated.
> >
> > ed.
> >
> >
> >

>
>




dada rara 07-08-2003 02:56 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
.... and no Refactoring support :-(

"dada rara" <asdf@asdf.se> wrote in message
news:beem0a$43rbv$1@ID-199036.news.dfncis.de...
> Agree on that, finding new useful features every day:
>
> Wizards for creating many different types of files (java, jsp, xsl, xml,

jar
> etc etc)
> Ant integration
> CVS integration
> XSL tag completion
> XSLT
> DB browser
> WAR creation
> JAR creation
> "Automatic" JavaDoc
> Internalisation help (property files)
> Tag libraries support
>
> much much more
>
> One weak side when working with complex projects, no easy way of

specifying
> multiple build paths...
>
> d.
>
> "Eric Olander" <eolandersprint0@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:nOAOa.89507$Io.7801553@newsread2.prod.itd.ear thlink.net...
> > I don't know if its the most popular, but the NetBeans IDE is good (and
> > free). See www.netbeans.org.
> >
> > -Eric
> >
> > "ed collins" <emacduffie@comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:Z8AOa.8335$N7.1053@sccrnsc03...
> > > I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP.

> What
> > > is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?
> > >
> > > Any and all replies would certainly be appreciated.
> > >
> > > ed.
> > >
> > >
> > >

> >
> >

>
>




Paul Guermonprez 07-08-2003 03:04 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
i use an editor (vim, but xemacs works too, or any source code editor)
+ ant (ant.apache.org) for building/cvs/...
+ cvs (better, but will take some time to get used to)

free, multiplatform,
IMHO the best way to learn (no flame).

paul.


ed collins wrote:
> I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP. What
> is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?
>
> Any and all replies would certainly be appreciated.
>
> ed.
>
>
>



kevinn@backer.com 07-08-2003 03:08 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
> I'm a college student and am in the process of learning
> Java and OOP. What is the most popular IDE to create
> Java programs?


I highly recommend JCreator.

Steve 07-08-2003 03:35 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
I'd totaly agree - use a basic text editor for learning Java. If you
want nice colours for keywords etc then use something like EditPlus or
TextPad - search the web for free/shareware tools.

A good IDE will do a lot of the work for you, which totaly defeats the
object [no pun intended] of learning the language. I also do not think
you will see any productivity gain if you are working on small
projects and building simple classes to learn features of the
langauge. I don't think you even need source code control, but if you
do I'd go for CVS. Any may be useful if you build a complex project
with a lot of classes, but I don't recal a need for it when I was at
University.

Learn the language first, then when you want to build a production
system look for the most suitable IDE - you'll want different IDEs for
different environments (e.g. J2ME for a cell phone has completely
different needs to a J2EE application, and a J2SE Swing app will be
different again).

I develop Java and C++ enterprise applications for a living and I use
Notepad more than I use JBuilder and the like.

Steve


On Tue, 08 Jul 2003 17:04:14 +0200, Paul Guermonprez
<paul@nospam.nospam> wrote:

> i use an editor (vim, but xemacs works too, or any source code editor)
>+ ant (ant.apache.org) for building/cvs/...
>+ cvs (better, but will take some time to get used to)
>
>free, multiplatform,
>IMHO the best way to learn (no flame).
>
>paul.
>
>
>ed collins wrote:
>> I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP. What
>> is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?
>>
>> Any and all replies would certainly be appreciated.
>>
>> ed.
>>
>>
>>



~ If emailing, please use: Steve_A_Haigh
~ @
~ hotmail.com
~

Drew Volpe 07-08-2003 04:07 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
Last time we met, ed collins <emacduffie@comcast.net> had said:
> I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP. What
> is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?



Eclipse is probably the most popular, as it's free and has a lot
nice features.


My personal favorite is IntelliJ's IDEA. It has a very well
thought out UI. It has a lot of great features like automatic
refactoring, imports optimization, popup javadocs, etc. but
it's all put together so that it never gets in your way and is
quick to use. One thing I love is you can right click any
class or method and either go to the declaration of that class/method
or find all usages of that class/method throughout your code.



dv

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
The geographical center of Boston is in Roxbury. Due north of the
center we find the South End. This is not to be confused with South
Boston which lies directly east from the South End. North of the South
End is East Boston and southwest of East Boston is the North End.

Drew Volpe, mylastname at hcs o harvard o edu

Dale King 07-08-2003 11:26 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
"Steve" <steve_a_haigh@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:0qolgv8tdopogodv3epodj27fmg43j3p99@4ax.com...
> I'd totaly agree - use a basic text editor for learning Java. If you
> want nice colours for keywords etc then use something like EditPlus or
> TextPad - search the web for free/shareware tools.


I totally disagree. And what does the poor newbie do when his program
doesn't work since he doesn't have a debugger? Imagine the nightmare trying
to figure out how to correctly compile a larger program spanning multiple
packages from the command line.

> A good IDE will do a lot of the work for you, which totaly defeats the
> object [no pun intended] of learning the language.


Since when is the work of building the code, part of the language? That is
just learning a tool that is not part of the language.

> I also do not think
> you will see any productivity gain if you are working on small
> projects and building simple classes to learn features of the
> langauge. I don't think you even need source code control, but if you
> do I'd go for CVS. Any may be useful if you build a complex project
> with a lot of classes, but I don't recal a need for it when I was at
> University.


That is why most IDE's are not a good fit for learning the language. There
is an IDE specifically designed for learning OOP and the language without
requiring you to learn arcane command line tools. It also has a good
debugger and facilities to help visualize the program.

That IDE is BlueJ (www.bluej.org).

> Learn the language first, then when you want to build a production
> system look for the most suitable IDE - you'll want different IDEs for
> different environments (e.g. J2ME for a cell phone has completely
> different needs to a J2EE application, and a J2SE Swing app will be
> different again).


I agree. Learn the language first. That is why I recommend BlueJ. Your
approach requires learning a tool which is essentially just a really bad
IDE.

> I develop Java and C++ enterprise applications for a living and I use
> Notepad more than I use JBuilder and the like.


It's your loss.

--
Dale King



Marc Rochkind 07-09-2003 03:55 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 18:27:27 -0500, Dale King <KingD@tmicha.net> wrote:

> "ed collins" <emacduffie@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:Z8AOa.8335$N7.1053@sccrnsc03...
>> I'm a college student and am in the process of learning Java and OOP.
>> What
>> is the most popular IDE to create Java programs?
>>
>> Any and all replies would certainly be appreciated.

>
>
> Most popular or favorite are irrelevant to you. You need the one that
> will
> best help you to learn the language and OOP. The best choice for that is
> BlueJ (www.bluej.org).
> --
> Dale King
>
>
>


Thanks for the tip. I downloaded BlueJ and indeed there is much to like.

One thing that's very irritating to me (although it would have no effect on
the real goals of BlueJ) is that it seems that ALL Java-based test editors
have very limited fine-grained editing features compared to native editors
on the two GUIs I'm most familiar with, Mac and Windows. Examples:
extending a selection by words after double-clicking a word, selecting a
line by clicking to its left, drag-and-drop editing.

Maybe someday someone will create a world-class editing object for Java.

So... I do my Java work on Solaris, but the editing with JCreator. (The
latter running on Windows. Shared files happen to be on a FreeBSD machine.)

--Marc

Drew Volpe 07-09-2003 07:23 PM

Re: IDE favorite
 
Last time we met, Marc Rochkind <rochkind@basepath.com> had said:


> Thanks for the tip. I downloaded BlueJ and indeed there is much to like.
>
> One thing that's very irritating to me (although it would have no effect on
> the real goals of BlueJ) is that it seems that ALL Java-based test editors
> have very limited fine-grained editing features compared to native editors
> on the two GUIs I'm most familiar with, Mac and Windows. Examples:
> extending a selection by words after double-clicking a word, selecting a
> line by clicking to its left, drag-and-drop editing.



IDEA has of all of those and a lot of other niceties I've never
seen in other editors. That's one of the most important things
to me: how mature is the UI. The little things really add up
if you're working in an application all day.


I think JBuilder has the features you mention too, iirc.



dv

--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
The geographical center of Boston is in Roxbury. Due north of the
center we find the South End. This is not to be confused with South
Boston which lies directly east from the South End. North of the South
End is East Boston and southwest of East Boston is the North End.

Drew Volpe, mylastname at hcs o harvard o edu


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